Nano News & Events

SABIC Announces Large Format Touch Sensor Capability with 2.5 and 3D Formability

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
With large format interactive displays becoming more ubiquitous – from large indoor and outdoor displays to electronic whiteboards – the need has increased for advanced materials that are highly sensi...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

QD Vision Named as CES 2016 Innovation Awards Honoree for its Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Optic

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
QD Vision has been named a CES 2016 Innovation Awards Honoree for its Color IQ™ quantum dot optic, which expands the color gamut for edge-lit displays such as TVs, LCD monitors and all-in-one computer...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Promising new approach for controlled fabrication of carbon nanostructures

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
An international team of researchers including Professor Federico Rosei and members of his group at INRS has developed a new strategy for fabricating atomically controlled carbon nanostructures used i...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoworld Snow Blowers Carve Straight Channels in Semiconductor Surfaces

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
In the nanoworld, tiny particles of gold can operate like snow blowers, churning through surface layers of an important class of semiconductors to dig unerringly straight paths. The surprising trenching capability, reported by scientists ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology specialist to lead Va. Tech's research division - Roanoke Times

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Nanotechnology specialist to lead Va. Tech's research divisionRoanoke TimesMayer has taught electrical engineering and materials science and engineering at Penn State and has been recognized for her research in device nanomanufacturing, the release stated. She has served as a site director for the National Science Foundation ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoscale Patterning Via Block Copolymers

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Thin films: Balancing surface tension between polymer blocks keeps segments aligned for photolithography
Categories: Nanotechnology News

ORNL Process Could Be White Lightning to Electronics Industry

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
(Jefferson County Post) A new era of electronics and even quantum devices could be ushered in with the fabrication of a virtually perfect single layer of "white graphene," according to researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory...12/20
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Move aside carbon: Boron nitride-reinforced materials are even stronger

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Carbon nanotubes are legendary in their strength—at least 30 times stronger than bullet-stopping Kevlar by some estimates. When mixed with lightweight polymers such as plastics and epoxy resins, the tiny tubes reinforce the material, like the rebar in a block of concrete, promising lightweight and strong materials for airplanes, spaceships, cars and even sports equipment.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Simple shell of plant virus sparks immune response against cancer: Mice tumor free and protected from metastases after treatment

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
The shells of a common plant virus, inhaled into a lung tumor or injected into ovarian, colon or breast tumors, not only triggered the immune system in mice to wipe out the tumors, but provided system...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

JPK releases the world’s most flexible AFM - the NanoWizard® 4 NanoScience AFM

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, announces the latest in their series of world-leading AFM systems, the Nano...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New device uses carbon nanotubes to snag molecules

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Engineers at MIT have devised a new technique for trapping hard-to-detect molecules, using forests of carbon nanotubes. The team modified a simple microfluidic channel with an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes — rolled lattices of carbon atoms that resemble tiny tubes of chicken wire. The researchers had previously devised a method for standing carbon nanotubes on their ends, like trees in a forest. With this method, they created a three-dimensional array of permeable carbon nanotubes within a microfluidic device, through which fluid can flow. Now, in a study published this week in the Journal of Microsystems and Nanoengineering, the researchers have given the nanotube array the ability to trap certain particles. To do this, the team coated the array, layer by layer, with polymers of alternating electric charge. “You can think of each nanotube in the forest as being concentrically coated with different layers of polymer,” says Brian Wardle, professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT. “If you drew it in cross-section, it would be like rings on a tree.” Depending on the number of layers deposited, the researchers can create thicker or thinner nanotubes and thereby tailor the porosity of the forest to capture larger or smaller particles of interest.  The nanotubes’ polymer coating may also be chemically manipulated to bind specific bioparticles flowing through the forest. To test this idea, the researchers applied an established technique to treat the surface of the nanotubes with antibodies that bind to prostate specific antigen (PSA), a common experimental target. The polymer-coated arrays captured 40 percent more antigens, compared with arrays lacking the polymer coating. Wardle says the combination of carbon nanotubes and multilayer coatings may help finely tune microfluidic devices to capture extremely small and rare particles, such as certain viruses and proteins. “There are smaller bioparticles that contain very rich amounts of information that we don’t currently have the ability to access in point-of-care [medical testing] devices like microfluidic chips,” says Wardle, who is a co-author on the paper. “Carbon nanotube arrays could actually be a platform that could target that size of bioparticle.” The paper’s lead author is Allison Yost, a former graduate student who is currently an engineer at Accion Systems. Others on the paper include graduate student Setareh Shahsavari; postdoc Roberta Polak; School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Innovation Gareth McKinley; professor of materials science and engineering Michael Rubner, and Raymond A. And Helen E. St. Laurent Professor of Chemical Engineering Robert Cohen. A porous forest Carbon nanotubes have been a subject of intense scientific study, as they possess exceptional electrical, mechanical, and optical properties. While their use in microfluidics has not been well explored, Wardle says carbon nanotubes are an ideal platform because their properties may be manipulated to attract certain nanometer-sized molecules. Additionally, carbon nanotubes are 99 percent porous, meaning a nanotube is about 1 percent carbon and 99 percent air. “Which is what you need,” Wardle says. “You need to flow quantities of fluid through this material to shed all the millions of particles you don’t want to find and grab the one you do want to find.” What’s more, Wardle says, a three-dimensional forest of carbon nanotubes would provide much more surface area on which target molecules may interact, compared with the two-dimensional surfaces in conventional microfluidics. “The capture efficiency would scale with surface area,” Wardle notes. A versatile array The team integrated a three-dimensional array of carbon nanotubes into a microfluidic device by using chemical vapor deposition and photolithography to grow and pattern carbon nanotubes onto silicon wafers. They then grouped the nanotubes into a cylinder-shaped forest, measuring about 50 micrometers tall and 1 millimeter wide, and centered the array within a 3 millimeter-wide, 7-millimeter long microfluidic channel. The researchers coated the nanotubes in successive layers of alternately charged polymer solutions in order to create distinct, binding layers around each nanotube. To do so, they flowed each solution through the channel and found they were able to create a more uniform coating with a gap between the top of the nanotube forest and the roof of the channel. Such a gap allowed solutions to flow over, then down into the forest, coating each individual nanotube. In the absence of a gap, solutions simply flowed around the forest, coating only the outer nanotubes. After coating the nanotube array in layers of polymer solution, the researchers demonstrated that the array could be primed to detect a given molecule, by treating it with antibodies that typically bind to prostate specific antigen (PSA). They pumped in a solution containing small amounts of PSA and found that the array captured the antigen effectively, throughout the forest, rather than just on the outer surface of a typical microfluidic element. Wardle says that the nanotube array is extremely versatile, as the carbon nanotubes may be manipulated mechanically, electrically, and optically, while the polymer coatings may be chemically altered to capture a wide range of particles. He says an immediate target may be biomarkers called exosomes, which are less than 100 nanometers wide and can be important signals of a disease’s progression. “Science is really picking up on how much information these particles contain, and they’re sort of everywhere, but really hard to find, even with large-scale equipment,” Wardle says. “This type of device actually has all the characteristics and functionality that would allow you to go after bioparticles like exosomes and things that really truly are nanometer scale.” This research was funded, in part, by the National Science Foundation.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Biodegradable Nanoparticles Applied to Produce Nanocomposite Films

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Iranian researchers from Yasouj University used a simple and quick method to produce bio-nanocomposites with high strength.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New ceramic firefighting foam becomes stronger when temperature increases

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
A team of chemists from ITMO University, in collaboration with research company SOPOT, has developed a novel type of firefighting foam based on inorganic silica nanoparticles. The new foam beats exist...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New approaches for hybrid solar cells: Nanostructured germanium for portable photovoltaics and battery electrodes

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Using a new procedure researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximillians University of Munich (LMU) can now produce extremely thin and robust, yet highly porous semico...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Virtually Perfect Graphene is Game-Changing for Electronics Industry

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
(Controlled Environments)... "Imagine batteries, capacitors, solar cells, video screens, and fuel cells as thin as a piece of paper," says ORNL's Yijing Stehle, postdoctoral associate and lead author of a paper published in Chemistry of Materials. She and colleagues are also working on a graphene hexagonal boron 2D capacitor and fuel cell prototype that are not only "super thin" but also transparent...12/2
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Imec improves performance and reliability of deeply-scaled CMOS logic devices

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Silicidation, amorphisation, doping and the introduction of junction-less nanowire devices pave the way to silicon CMOS devices beyond the 5nm technology node At this week’s IEEE...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Atomically flat tunnel transistor overcomes fundamental power challenge of electronics: A new transistor developed by UC Santa Barbara engineers overcomes one of the fundamental limitations of conventional transistors and reduces power dissipation by over

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
One of the greatest challenges in the evolution of electronics has been to reduce power consumption during transistor switching operation. In a study recently reported in Nature, engineers at Universi...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanostructured metal coatings let the light through for electrical devices

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Light and electricity dance a complicated tango in devices like LEDs, solar cells and sensors. A new anti-reflection coating developed by engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, i...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Leti Develops Local-strain Techniques in FD-SOI Fabrication To Improve Next-Generation Performance, Energy Use

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
CEA-Leti today announced it has developed two techniques to induce local strain in FD-SOI processes for next-generation FD-SOI circuits that will produce more speed at the same, or lower, power consum...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Physicists make transparent conductors by means of stamping and growing

InterNano Industry News - February 5, 2016 - 4:45am
Researchers from FOM institute AMOLF have discovered a new technique to make transparent conductors used in electronics such as solar cells and smartphones. The technique is a combination of a stamping mechanism on the nanoscale and a chemical process. Compared with existing production methods, this new technique results in a better conducting product at lower costs. The researchers will publish the results online on December 3rd in the journal Advanced Materials.
Categories: Nanotechnology News