Nano News & Events

Screen Printable Functionalised Graphene Ink

InterNano Industry News - January 20, 2016 - 4:45am
Haydale reports how its proprietary HDPlas® technology has been used to create functionalised Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) that have been incorporated into a functional graphene ink, which has been d...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Ultrasensitive sensors made from boron-doped graphene

InterNano Industry News - January 16, 2016 - 4:45am
Ultrasensitive gas sensors based on the infusion of boron atoms into graphene—a tightly bound matrix of carbon atoms—may soon be possible, according to an international team of researchers from six countries.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Celator VYXEOS Honored with Nanomedicine Award 2015

InterNano Industry News - January 16, 2016 - 4:45am
Celator Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that VYXEOS™ (formerly referred to as CPX-351) was recognized with the Nanomedicine Award 2015.  This award recognizes projects or products...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanopolymeric Compound-Based Full-Body Suit Protects Against Viral, Biological and Chemical Threats

InterNano Industry News - January 16, 2016 - 4:45am
Radiation Shield Technologies, a global developer of advanced personal-protection gear, today announced its introduction of Demron ICE: the world’s first full-body suit that protects against...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Much Ado About Carbon Nanotubes...Or Not

InterNano Industry News - January 16, 2016 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> Photo: iStockphoto Researchers at the University of Paris-Saclay in France have discovered that fluid samples taken from the airways of 64 asthmatic children contained carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In addition, the France-based researchers determined that five other children studied also had CNTs in macrophages found in their lungs. While this will no doubt add fuel to the fury of NGOs bent on shutting down research into nanotechnology immediately, there is little in this research that breaks new ground—at least qualitatively. “From past studies, the conditions in combustion engines seem to favor the production of at least some CNTs (especially where there are trace metals in lubricants that can act as catalysts for CNT growth),” explained Andrew Maynard Director, Risk Innovation Lab and Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, in an e-mail interview. Says Maynard: What, to my knowledge, is still not known, is the relative concentrations of CNT in ambient air that may be inhaled, the precise nature of these CNT in terms of physical and chemical structure, and the range of sources that may lead to ambient CNT. This is important, as the potential for fibrous particles to cause lung damage depends on characteristics such as their length—and many of the fibers shown in the paper appear too short to raise substantial concerns. It’s not even clear from the research whether the nanoparticles in question are in fact carbon nanotubes. At this point, they are best described as carbon nanotube-like fibers. Nonetheless, Maynard praises the research for establishing that these carbon nanotube-like fibers are part of the urban aerosol and therefore end up in the lungs of anyone who breathes it in. However, he cautions that the findings don’t provide information on the potential health risks associated with these exposures. “Because of this,” Maynard told IEEE Spectrum, “it would be highly premature to draw any conclusions on health risk from the study.” He added that, “It would be appropriate to conduct further study into whether there is an association between these unusual carbon-based fibers and ill health.” At least some of the coverage of the research has made the misleading point that “nanotubes have shown great potential in areas such as computing, clothing and healthcare technology” with the obvious implication being that the CNTs used in these applications are the ones found in the lungs of children. While the research doesn’t draw a distinction between manufactured CNTs and the natural and incidental varieties produced by, say, car exhausts, there is little to suggest they are anything other than particles that have been around with us since the introduction of the internal combustion engine. Meanwhile, there has been little evidence showing that a manufactured CNT, once embedded in the matrix of a material, can ever be separated from that matrix so that it’s free to float around in the air. “Some studies have indicated that occasionally single nanotubes might be released from abraded materials,” Maynard admits. “But it looks like the release rates are extremely low.  This is what would be expected given how tightly carbon nanotubes bind to polymers used in composite materials, and the amount of energy that would be required to release them.” Maynard points that it may be possible in principle to create fingerprints for different types of CNTs based on their source, allowing scientists to determine definitively whether a sample of CNTs is from car exhaust, or tennis racquets and bicycles. He adds: For instance, CNTs that are lab generated will often be associated with trace amounts of catalyst materials such as nickel or iron.  However, I suspect that such fingerprinting will require a level of characterization rarely used on such materials. Such characterization may also be a moot point from a health perspective. Maynard notes that while ambient carbon nanotubes may be analytically difficult to distinguish from engineered carbon nanotubes, it’s reasonable to assume that our lungs will also find it hard to make the distinction.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Capacitor breakthrough: Nanotechnology offers new approach to increasing storage ability of dielectric capacitors

InterNano Industry News - January 14, 2016 - 4:45am
Oct. 21, 2015, was the day that Doc Brown and Marty McFly landed in the future in their DeLorean, with time travel made possible by a "flux capacitor."
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Free online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics

InterNano Industry News - January 14, 2016 - 4:45am
Richard P. Feynman (1918-1988) Free to read online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics A core component of Foresight’s founding vision is Richard Feynman’s 1959 talk “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” in which he envisioned tiny machines building complex products with atomic precision. “Put the atoms down where the chemist says, and so you make the substance,” Feynman said. Foresight annually awards the Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes: Experimental and Theory “to researchers whose recent work have most advanced the achievement of Feynman’s goal for nanotechnology: the construction of atomically-precise products through the use of molecular machine systems.” Besides sharing a Nobel Prize for Physics Richard Feynman was also well-known as an exceptionally effective teacher. A year ago we were privileged to communicate the availability, through the efforts of Mr. John Neer, of 400 hours of Richard Feynman’s Hughes Lectures. An article on The Smithsonian publicizes the free to read online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, long recognized as the definitive physics textbook. Since well-understood physical law is the foundation for the expectation that High-Throughput Atomically Precise Manufacturing is feasible, a sound understanding of basic physics provides an excellent foundation for thinking about the future of technology. Now arguably the best resources toward that understanding are available online for free. —James Lewis, PhD
Categories: Nanotechnology News

George Ledlie Prize awarded to Joanna Aizenberg - Harvard Gazette

InterNano Industry News - January 14, 2016 - 4:45am
Harvard GazetteGeorge Ledlie Prize awarded to Joanna AizenbergHarvard GazetteAs an innovator in the rapidly expanding field of biomimetic inorganic materials synthesis, she uses these biological principles to develop new nanofabrication strategies that have led to the development of advanced materials and devices with ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Researchers take first steps to create biodegradable displays for electronics

InterNano Industry News - January 14, 2016 - 4:45am
Americans, on average, replace their mobile phones every 22 months, junking more than 150 million phones a year in the process. When it comes to recycling and processing all of this electronic waste,...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

How copper makes organic light-emitting diodes more efficient

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Use of copper as a fluorescent material allows for the manufacture of inexpensive and environmentally compatible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thermally activated delayed fuorescence ensures high light yield.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology metallic glue may stick it to soldering and welding

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Researchers developed a glue that binds metal to metal to glass to you-name-it, sets at room temperature, and requires little pressure to seal.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Aluminum nanoparticles could improve electronic displays

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Using aluminum nanostructures could provide a vivid, low-cost alternative for producing digital color.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Boron nitride nanotubes could help build better planes and space shuttles

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Researchers determined the interface strength between boron nitride nanotubes and epoxy and other polymers.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Microcannons that fire drug-loaded nanobullets

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
The goal of a vast amount of nanomedicine research is the perfect drug carrier: it is injected into the body and transports itself to the correct target, such as a tumor, and delivers the required therapeutic drug dose at this target. This idealized concept was first proposed at the beginning of the 20th century and was nicknamed the 'magic bullet' concept. Taking this 'bullet' concept literally, researchers have developed acoustically triggered microcannons, capable of versatile loading and effective firing of nanobullets, as novel tools toward advancing microscale tissue penetration of therapeutic payloads.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

3D-printing with graphene

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
The successful implementation of graphene-based devices invariably requires the precise patterning of graphene sheets at both the micrometer and nanometer scale. It appears that 3D-printing techniques are an attractive fabrication route towards three-dimensional graphene structures. Researchers have now used flakes of chemically modified graphene, namely graphene oxide GO and its reduced form rGO, together with very small amounts of a responsive polymer, to formulate water based ink or pastes to be used in 3D printers.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

DARPA program seeks ability to assemble atom-sized pieces into practical products

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
DARPA selects 10 performers to develop technologies that bridge the existing manufacturing gap between nano-scale pieces and millimeter-scale components.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Researchers create exceptionally strong and lightweight new metal

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Magnesium infused with dense silicon carbide nanoparticles could be used for airplanes, cars, mobile electronics and more.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

2D islands in graphene hold promise for future device fabrication

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
In what could prove to be a significant advance in the fabrication of graphene-based nanodevices, researchers have discovered a new mechanism for assembling two-dimensional molecular 'islands' that could be used to modify graphene at the nanoscale.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoparticles of shell of plant virus spark immune response against cancer

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Mice tumor free and protected from metastases after treatment.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Graphene proves a perfect fit for wearable devices

InterNano Industry News - January 12, 2016 - 4:45am
Cheap, flexible, wireless graphene communication devices such as mobile phones and healthcare monitors can be directly printed into clothing and even skin, researchers have demonstrated.
Categories: Nanotechnology News