National Nanomanufacturing Network

Syndicate content
InterNano is an open-source online information clearinghouse for the nanomanufacturing research and development (R&D) community in the United States. It is designed provide this community with an array of tools and collections relevant to its work and to the development of viable nanomanufacturing applications.
Updated: 1 day 59 min ago

N12 Technologies, Inc.

August 24, 2015 - 3:12pm
DirectoryN12 is a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based startup that’s commercializing revolutionary nanotechnology to enhance composite materials. Based on MIT-developed and exclusively licensed vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) technology, N12 has created the world’s first commercial-scale continuous manufacturing capability for its Nanostitch™ product. Nanostitch™ improves shear properties of carbon-fiber and other composite materials by 10-40% and lengthens fatigue life 100 fold. Address: 85 Bolton Street Cambridge, MA 02140Contact Info:  URL:  http://www.n12technologies.com Type: IndustryEmail Address: info@n12technologies.comPhone: 857-259-6622InterNano Taxonomy: NanocompositesCarbon nanotube (CNT)Carbon nanotube synthesisTags: NanostitchCarbon FiberCompositesvertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT)commercial scalecontinuous manufacturing

Setting Ground Rules for Nanotechnology Research

August 20, 2015 - 3:11pm
Ken Kingery, Duke UniversityTwo new projects set the stage for nanotechnology research to move into Big Data

World's first nanorod-based solar module

August 13, 2015 - 2:13pm
Azhar Fakharuddin, Rajan Jose and Thomas BrownEnergy security has been a top global concern motivating researchers to seek it from renewable and cost-effective resources.

Coping with Rapid Change in the Electronics Industry – what it means for Nano-initiatives and Nano-startups

August 5, 2015 - 2:27pm
Alan Rae, Ph.D., M.B.A.    Industry drivers are relentlessly changing the industry and its materials needs.  Current drivers include the increasing dominance of handhelds, everything connected, automobile automation, low power / long battery life, wearables and medical electronics. Increasing sustainability and other regulations are a given. CMOS devices are now below 10nm feature sizes, and the semiconductor industry is figuring out what it needs to do to predict the future as we move to different semiconductor materials. For evidence, look no further than the emergence of  "ITRS 2.0", a regrouping of ITRS as it looks towards discontinuous change that will involve different semiconductors - silicon carbide and other compound semiconductors for example - as well as carbon nanotubes, graphene and other 2-D structures. Moore's law, "More Moore",  "More than Moore" or something quite different?   Traditional roadmapping struggles to deal with discontinuous change.  It's not easy to predict when a new technology will become cost competitive, how it can scale to meet market needs, how the existing technologies can be tweaked to meet the performance challenge of new materials - or even which technologies will win and who will develop them! It becomes a situation where multiple scenarios are possible and the experts in the room have to make a best judgement based on the available information.   Currently, nanostructures appear to be limited to semiconductors and hydrophobic/oleophobic surfaces. Nanomaterials or near-nano materials are increasingly found in batteries, supercapacitors, silver for die attach and solar applications, phosphors and a range of polymer fillers as well as in CMP slurries.   The proposed changes by EPA to TSCA will affect reporting and other requirements for nanomaterials (www.epa.gov/oppt/nano/ and available as a Federal Register extract (Vol.80, No.65, April 26, 2015), searchable as EPA-HQ-OPPT-2010-0572-0001) have raised concerns as in some interpretations they appear to cover in-process slurried and suspended materials and other forms which would cover not only previously unregulated parts of the electronics industry but also most of the advanced ceramics industry.   Who will develop the nanomaterial and nanostructures?  The financial institutions and angel investors are not supporting the industry well.  I personally am working with two electronics startups struggling for survival as most of the angel money goes to handheld apps, VCs are missing in action, and IPOs seem to be limited to pharmaceuticals.  Those that are successful will partner with established companies who can supply the "patient money" needed for commercialization and scaling.  We do need a lot more corporations to embrace open innovation - rather than "not invented here!" for this to be successful.   The electronics industry needs nanomaterials and nanostructures if it is to meet customer expectations - higher performance, better battery life and more affordable.  We need to continue to work with startups and established industry to commercialize the excellent work stimulated by the NNI and now coming out of Universities to make this happen.                               Image credit: Permission to reprint image requested from ITRS.More than Moore White Paper by the IRC  

Aculon Launches NanoProof Series for PCB Waterproofing

July 31, 2015 - 8:48am
Mario Gattuso, Aculon  Aculon’s proprietary surface modification technology treats a PCB to be repellent to water and/or oil while maintaining its full operating functionality. Until now water-resistance product offerings generally fall into two categories: conformal solution based hydro/oleophobic coatings that repel fluids but require some level of masking or “keep-out” areas, and vacuum-deposited coatings (which is a batch process and also require masking) such as parylene-based treatments. Aculon® NanoProof™ surface treatments create a third category - no mask solution based hydro/oleophobic coatings that are done on an inline basis and deliver the benefits of conformal coatings yet eliminate the need for costly capital investment and avoiding the bottlenecking batch process of vacuum based manufacturing or masking operations. Aculon’s NanoProof™ Series offer customers a range of PCB waterproofing solutions from protecting against accidental water damage (NanoProof 1.0) to IPX7, immersion in water at one meter depth for 30 minutes (NanoProof™ 3.0,3.5,4.0), to greater barrier properties that can withstand 100 hours immersion in sweat solutions and some of the most stringent test methods developed for non-hermetic components (NanoProof™ 5.0) . The benefits of using Aculon NanoProof include improved device reliability, reduced returns from device failures, and lower system wide costs particularly when compared to the cost of a vacuum deposition processes. In addition the electrical connections are not impacted and the integrity of the signal strength, antenna and acoustic performance remain in tact. Aculon NanoProof™ Series uses a mix of Aculon’s Proprietary Transition Metal Complexate technology (TMC) and fluorinated acrylic polymers to achieve a series of products that are compatible with all of the common material types used in SMT parts. Aculon’s NanoProof™ series are sprayable or dip based coatings that do not require a cure and have no impact on conductivity testing. NanoProof is safe for us in factory environments as it is non toxic. While some of the NanoProof™ series are so thin that they are invisible to naked eye, all of the Nanoproof™ series are available with UV tracer dye added to ensure detection at customer sites. Aculon’s NanoProof technology has already been adopted by a number of customers as they were able to demonstrate improved product performance while utilizing a flexible application process that can lower the total operating costs when compared to parylene based coatings. This series is designed so that that there is an ideal protection solution for PCB’s in need of water protection! “For several years Aculon has been a leading supplier of nanocoatings to the electronics industry. We are delighted to extend our product offering to include the NanoProof series of treatments that can protect customer’s PCB from water damage and immersion. In the electronics business we have learned often one product does not fit all, hence we developed a series of product as different customers have different requirements” said Edward Hughes, CEO of Aculon. “We will work with our customers to ensure that they get the right product at the right price to meet their requirements.” For further information regarding distribution availability please contact Mario Gattuso directly at gattuso@aculon.com . About Aculon, Inc. Aculon specializes in inventing and commercializing unique surface modification technologies for the electronics, industrial and consumer products industries. The Company's technologies use low capital intensity methods of application such as dipping and spray and do not involve a vacuum chamber. Key benefits of Aculon technology include: • Repellency – Ability to apply hydrophobic coatings, superhydrophic coatings and oleophobic coatings on surfaces to repel water, oil, and most all liquids. • Particle Treatment – Functionalize nanoparticles to improve many characteristics such as hydrophobicity, oleophobicity, and adhesion. • Adhesion – Boost the adhesion of challenging surfaces with adhesion promoting treatments. Aculon’s applications include: Aculon NanoClear - the leading nanocoating for the PCB Stencil market -Treatment of Optical parts - sunglasses, prescription eyewear, lenses -Treatment of Stainless Steel probes for use in the Oil industry -Treatment of Sapphire lens to repel oil -Treatment of Medical Devices to enhance fluidic motion -Treatment of Electronic testing components to prevent material build up. -Treatment of components for consumer products such as watches -Stainless Steel Coatings for numerous applications Production of Hydrophobic pen applications for use in the optical market For more information, please click here Contacts: Mario Gattusogattuso@aculon.com Copyright © Aculon, Inc.

Nano-C Receives EPA Approvals for Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

July 31, 2015 - 8:36am
Viktor Vejins, Nano-CNano-C, Inc. received clearance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to manufacture and sell Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) for a wide range of applications.  Nano-C worked extensively with the EPA through the TSCA Premanufacture Notice (“PMN”) process to develop effective environmental, health and safety protocols for the production and use of SWCNT.  This follows PMN clearances that Nano-C has received earlier for manufacturing fullerene and fullerene derivatives.  Nano-C worked with Mr. John V. Massingale of Greenwich Chemical Consulting, a leading authority on TSCA. “We are delighted to have received the EPA’s clearance which provides a sound foundation for Nano-C and its customers.  This makes Nano-C an approved commercial source for these advanced materials in the United States.  EPA clearance for SWCNT manufacture and sale is a very critical step toward their commercial applications including transparent conductors for displays and touch screens, printed electronics and memory devices,” said Viktor Vejins, President and CEO of Nano-C.  “As we are actively working with multiple customers on exciting new memory products, Nantero is extremely pleased to see Nano-C gain EPA clearance," said Greg Schmergel, Co-founder and CEO of Nantero, Inc., a developer of carbon nanotube based memory devices for consumer and enterprise markets. "This milestone establishes Nano-C as a world-leading supplier of high-quality SWCNT and represents a big step forward towards their use in commercial products. We look forward to working with Nano-C as we deliver a new generation of super-fast, high density memory." Please contact Nano-C for further information about SWCNT, fullerenes, and fullerene derivatives in our product portfolio.  About Nano-C, Inc.Located in Westwood, Massachusetts, Nano-C is a leading developer of nanostructured carbon for use in energy and electronics applications. These materials include fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and their chemical derivatives. Nano-C’s mission is to play a key role in enabling applications of these materials and is committed to their responsible development and use. Nano-C is a privately held company founded in 2001. For more information, visit: http://www.nano-c.com/. Contact:Viktor Vejins, Nano-CE-mail: nanocinfo@nano-c.com

Aculon Launches NanoProof Series for PCB Waterproofing

July 31, 2015 - 3:48am
Aculon’s proprietary surface modification technology treats a PCB to be repellent to water and/or oil while maintaining its full operating functionality. Until now water-resistance product offerings generally fall into two categories: conformal solution based hydro/oleophobic coatings that repel fluids but require some level of masking or “keep-out” areas, and vacuum-deposited coatings (which is a batch process and also require masking) such as parylene-based treatments. Aculon® NanoProof™ surface treatments create a third category - no mask solution based hydro/oleophobic coatings that are done on an inline basis and deliver the benefits of conformal coatings yet eliminate the need for costly capital investment and avoiding the bottlenecking batch process of vacuum based manufacturing or masking operations. Aculon’s NanoProof™ Series offer customers a range of PCB waterproofing solutions from protecting against accidental water damage (NanoProof 1.0) to IPX7, immersion in water at one meter depth for 30 minutes (NanoProof™ 3.0,3.5,4.0), to greater barrier properties that can withstand 100 hours immersion in sweat solutions and some of the most stringent test methods developed for non-hermetic components (NanoProof™ 5.0) . The benefits of using Aculon NanoProof include improved device reliability, reduced returns from device failures, and lower system wide costs particularly when compared to the cost of a vacuum deposition processes. In addition the electrical connections are not impacted and the integrity of the signal strength, antenna and acoustic performance remain in tact. Aculon NanoProof™ Series uses a mix of Aculon’s Proprietary Transition Metal Complexate technology (TMC) and fluorinated acrylic polymers to achieve a series of products that are compatible with all of the common material types used in SMT parts. Aculon’s NanoProof™ series are sprayable or dip based coatings that do not require a cure and have no impact on conductivity testing. NanoProof is safe for us in factory environments as it is non toxic. While some of the NanoProof™ series are so thin that they are invisible to naked eye, all of the Nanoproof™ series are available with UV tracer dye added to ensure detection at customer sites. Aculon’s NanoProof technology has already been adopted by a number of customers as they were able to demonstrate improved product performance while utilizing a flexible application process that can lower the total operating costs when compared to parylene based coatings. This series is designed so that that there is an ideal protection solution for PCB’s in need of water protection! “For several years Aculon has been a leading supplier of nanocoatings to the electronics industry. We are delighted to extend our product offering to include the NanoProof series of treatments that can protect customer’s PCB from water damage and immersion. In the electronics business we have learned often one product does not fit all, hence we developed a series of product as different customers have different requirements” said Edward Hughes, CEO of Aculon. “We will work with our customers to ensure that they get the right product at the right price to meet their requirements.” For further information regarding distribution availability please contact Mario Gattuso directly at gattuso@aculon.com (mailto:gattuso@aculon.com) .About Aculon, Inc.Aculon specializes in inventing and commercializing unique surface modification technologies for the electronics, industrial and consumer products industries. The Company's technologies use low capital intensity methods of application such as dipping and spray and do not involve a vacuum chamber. Key benefits of Aculon technology include: • Repellency – Ability to apply hydrophobic coatings, superhydrophic coatings and oleophobic coatings on surfaces to repel water, oil, and most all liquids.• Particle Treatment – Functionalize nanoparticles to improve many characteristics such as hydrophobicity, oleophobicity, and adhesion.• Adhesion – Boost the adhesion of challenging surfaces with adhesion promoting treatments. Aculon’s applications include: Aculon NanoClear - the leading nanocoating for the PCB Stencil market-Treatment of Optical parts - sunglasses, prescription eyewear, lenses-Treatment of Stainless Steel probes for use in the Oil industry-Treatment of Sapphire lens to repel oil-Treatment of Medical Devices to enhance fluidic motion-Treatment of Electronic testing components to prevent material build up.-Treatment of components for consumer products such as watches-Stainless Steel Coatings for numerous applicationsProduction of Hydrophobic pen applications for use in the optical market For more information, please click here (http://www.aculon.com) Contacts:Mario Gattusogattuso@aculon.com (mailto:gattuso@aculon.com) Copyright © Aculon, Inc.

Nano-C Receives EPA Approvals for Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

July 31, 2015 - 3:36am
Nano-C, Inc. received clearance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to manufacture and sell Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) for a wide range of applications. Nano-C worked extensively with the EPA through the TSCA Premanufacture Notice (“PMN”) process to develop effective environmental, health and safety protocols for the production and use of SWCNT. This follows PMN clearances that Nano-C has received earlier for manufacturing fullerene and fullerene derivatives. Nano-C worked with Mr. John V. Massingale of Greenwich Chemical Consulting, a leading authority on TSCA. “We are delighted to have received the EPA’s clearance which provides a sound foundation for Nano-C and its customers. This makes Nano-C an approved commercial source for these advanced materials in the United States. EPA clearance for SWCNT manufacture and sale is a very critical step toward their commercial applications including transparent conductors for displays and touch screens, printed electronics and memory devices,” said Viktor Vejins, President and CEO of Nano-C. “As we are actively working with multiple customers on exciting new memory products, Nantero is extremely pleased to see Nano-C gain EPA clearance," said Greg Schmergel, Co-founder and CEO of Nantero, Inc., a developer of carbon nanotube based memory devices for consumer and enterprise markets. "This milestone establishes Nano-C as a world-leading supplier of high-quality SWCNT and represents a big step forward towards their use in commercial products. We look forward to working with Nano-C as we deliver a new generation of super-fast, high density memory." Please contact Nano-C for further information about SWCNT, fullerenes, and fullerene derivatives in our product portfolio. About Nano-C, Inc.Located in Westwood, Massachusetts, Nano-C is a leading developer of nanostructured carbon for use in energy and electronics applications. These materials include fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and their chemical derivatives. Nano-C’s mission is to play a key role in enabling applications of these materials and is committed to their responsible development and use. Nano-C is a privately held company founded in 2001. For more information, visit: http://www.nano-c.com/. Contact:Viktor Vejins, Nano-CE-mail: nanocinfo@nano-c.com (mailto:nanocinfo@nano-c.com)

Solution-Based Nanomaterials Advancing the Performance of Thin-Film Transistors, Circuits, and Sensing Systems

July 30, 2015 - 1:47pm
Jeff Morse, Ph.D.   A General Route toward Complete Room Temperature Processing of Printed and High Performance Oxide ElectronicsWhile thin-film transistor (TFT) devices and circuits have existed for decades now, mostly as switching circuit arrays for addressing pixels for display applications, the emergence of flexible and printed sensor device applications have renewed the emphasis for high performance TFT integrated circuits and systems. Common functions for most sensor systems include signal amplification, and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) prior to data storage or transmission to conventional electronics, which tend to require custom interface designs for standardized silicon chips. Diverging from traditional silicon electronics, a custom printed circuit enabling this functional interface to external silicon electronics provides a versatile approach to standardizing the silicon electronics components that can be readily adapted to a broad range of sensor types and applications. Furthermore, if sensors and TFT circuits and subsystem functions can be readily printed on flexible substrates scalable to high throughput production processes, for example roll-to-roll (R2R) or sheet-to-sheet (S2S) processes, then key challenges associated with cost and performance can be addressed for grand challenge applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT), or wearable health monitoring devices.     Voltage-Controlled Ring Oscillators Based on Inkjet Printed Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Tin OxideAn approach that has gained a significant amount of attention is the direct printing of TFT device layers and architectures from nanomaterials dispersions or inks that can be readily printed and patterned using predominantly additive approaches such as inkjet, gravure, flexographic, or nanoimprint patterning that are scalable to production platforms. A key challenge has been developing nanoparticle dispersions or inks that are stable and reproducible. One approach to circumvent this is to functionalize the nanoparticles with ligands that provide stable, well-dispersed solutions on the one hand, while not degrading electronic properties of the semiconducting nanomaterial films after printing and curing. An example is the results reported by Baby et. al. where complimentary TFT devices were fabricated using nanoparticles of Indium Oxide (In2O3) for the n-type and Copper Oxide (Cu2O) for the p-type device dispersed using sodium poly acrylic acid (PAANa) ligands. Simple inverter circuits were demonstrated using inkjet printing. In another example, Kim et. al. fabricated double gate voltage controlled ring oscillator circuits using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as the p-channel device and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles for the n-channel device. Inkjet printing of the semiconductor films was complimented by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of the alumina (Al2O3) gate dielectric film. Additionally, Ha et. al. reported on the use of self assembled nano-dielectric film using high-k zirconia (ZrO) and hafnia (HfO) nanoparticle dispersions with polar organic chemistries to create a well-controlled gate dielectric film.     Hybrid Gate Dielectric Materials for Unconventional Electronic CircuitryThus, a range of nanomaterials, dispersion chemistries, and nanomanufacturing processes have been demonstrated recently enabling complete solution-based process compatibility for active TFT devices and circuits. These results will provide key enablers for advancement of flexible printed circuits and subsystems supporting future sensor platforms and networks for applications in wearables, smart textiles, health and infrastructure monitoring, and IoT.   References: A General Route toward Complete Room Temperature Processing of Printed and High Performance Oxide Electronics Tessy T. Baby, Suresh K. Garlapati, Simone Dehm, Marc Häming, Robert Kruk, Horst Hahn, and Subho Dasgupta ACS Nano, 2015, 9 (3), pp 3075-3083 DOI: 10.1021/nn507326z Voltage-Controlled Ring Oscillators Based on Inkjet Printed Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Tin Oxide Bongjun Kim, Jaeyoung Park, Michael L. Geier, Mark C. Hersam, and Ananth Dodabalapur ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2015, 7 (22), pp 12009-12014 DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b02093 Hybrid Gate Dielectric Materials for Unconventional Electronic Circuitry Young-Geun Ha, Ken Everaerts, Mark C. Hersam, and Tobin J. Marks Acc. Chem. Res., 2014, 47 (4), pp 1019-1028 DOI: 10.1021/ar4002262 Images reprinted with permission. Copyright 2015 American Chemical Society

Solution-Based Nanomaterials Advancing the Performance of Thin-Film Transistors, Circuits, and ...

July 30, 2015 - 8:47am
While thin-film transistor (TFT) devices and circuits have existed for decades now, mostly as switching circuit arrays for addressing pixels for display applications, the emergence of flexible and printed sensor device applications have renewed the emphasis for high performance TFT integrated circuits and systems. Common functions for most sensor systems include signal amplification, and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) prior to data storage or transmission to conventional electronics, which tend to require custom interface designs for standardized silicon chips. Diverging from traditional silicon electronics, a custom printed circuit enabling this functional interface to external silicon electronics provides a versatile approach to standardizing the silicon electronics components that can be readily adapted to a broad range of sensor types and applications. Furthermore, if sensors and TFT circuits and subsystem functions can be readily printed on flexible substrates scalable to high throughput production processes, for example roll-to-roll (R2R) or sheet-to-sheet (S2S) processes, then key challenges associated with cost and performance can be addressed for grand challenge applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT), or wearable health monitoring devices. An approach that has gained a significant amount of attention is the direct printing of TFT device layers and architectures from nanomaterials dispersions or inks that can be readily printed and patterned using predominantly additive approaches such as inkjet, gravure, flexographic, or nanoimprint patterning that are scalable to production platforms. A key challenge has been developing nanoparticle dispersions or inks that are stable and reproducible. One approach to circumvent this is to functionalize the nanoparticles with ligands that provide stable, well-dispersed solutions on the one hand, while not degrading electronic properties of the semiconducting nanomaterial films after printing and curing. An example is the results reported by Baby et. al. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn507326z) where complimentary TFT devices were fabricated using nanoparticles of Indium Oxide (In2O3) for the n-type and Copper Oxide (Cu2O) for the p-type device dispersed using sodium poly acrylic acid (PAANa) ligands. Simple inverter circuits were demonstrated using inkjet printing. In another example, Kim et. al. fabricated double gate voltage controlled ring oscillator circuits (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.5b02093) using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as the p-channel device and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles for the n-channel device. Inkjet printing of the semiconductor films was complimented by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of the alumina (Al2O3) gate dielectric film. Additionally, Ha et. al. reported on the use of self assembled nano-dielectric film (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ar4002262) using high-k zirconia (ZrO) and hafnia (HfO) nanoparticle dispersions with polar organic chemistries to create a well-controlled gate dielectric film.Thus, a range of nanomaterials, dispersion chemistries, and nanomanufacturing processes have been demonstrated recently enabling complete solution-based process compatibility for active TFT devices and circuits. These results will provide key enablers for advancement of flexible printed circuits and subsystems supporting future sensor platforms and networks for applications in wearables, smart textiles, health and infrastructure monitoring, and IoT. References:A General Route toward Complete Room Temperature Processing of Printed and High Performance Oxide Electronics (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn507326z) Tessy T. Baby, Suresh K. Garlapati, Simone Dehm, Marc Häming, Robert Kruk, Horst Hahn, and Subho DasguptaACS Nano, 2015, 9 (3), pp 3075-3083DOI: 10.1021/nn507326z (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn507326z) Voltage-Controlled Ring Oscillators Based on Inkjet Printed Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Tin Oxide (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.5b02093) Bongjun Kim, Jaeyoung Park, Michael L. Geier, Mark C. Hersam, and Ananth DodabalapurACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2015, 7 (22), pp 12009-12014DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b02093 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.5b02093) Hybrid Gate Dielectric Materials for Unconventional Electronic Circuitry (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ar4002262) Young-Geun Ha, Ken Everaerts, Mark C. Hersam, and Tobin J. MarksAcc. Chem. Res., 2014, 47 (4), pp 1019-1028DOI: 10.1021/ar4002262 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ar4002262) Images reprinted with permission. Copyright 2015 American Chemical Society

Nanoparticles Accelerate and Improve Healing of Burn Wounds

July 29, 2015 - 12:56pm
Michael Berger, NanowerkNAC-SNO nanoparticles clinically accelerate burn wound healing. (©Journal of Drugs in Dermatology) Skin thermal burns are a complex and major source of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in the United States, with 486,000 patients treated for burn injury each year. Given the range of causes, from fire associated injury to water scalding, patients often present with multiple and complex burns – wounds that often worsen and expand over the first few days do to the associated underlying inflammation and injury. "Though the impact of these injuries is large, our current treatment armament falls short, with gold standard treatments lacking evidence to support their use, or even worse, may even delay wound healing as was recently elucidated with silver sulfadiazine," Dr. Adam Friedman, Associate Professor of Dermatology and Director of Translational Research at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, tells Nanowerk. To address this gap, Friedman and colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine utilized a unique nanotechnology that can both release the potent biomolecule nitric oxide (NO) over time, as well as facilitate nitrosation, the addition of an NO group to a biological molecule, which is central many of NO’s activity. The team reported their findings in Journal of Drugs in Dermatology ("N-acetylcysteine S-nitrosothiol Nanoparticles Prevent Wound Expansion and Accelerate Wound Closure in a Murine Burn Model"). "The role of nitric oxide in wound healing is well established through all three phases," says Friedman. "Both NO itself and the act of nitrosation are exceedingly important in the transition from the inflammatory phase to the proliferative phase of wound healing. Therefore, we created a system that can do both." The scientists evaluated a previously described S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine containing hydrogel-based nanoparticle platform (NAC-SNO-np) on in vivo burn wound closure, expansion and inflammation in a multi burn model. Burn wound expansion in the NAC-SNO-np in coconut oil treated group was significantly attenuated compared to untreated control, coconut oil, and control-np groups. The clinically observed acceleration of wound healing was matched with the histologic evaluation of the burn wounds, with the NAC-SNO-np treated groups showing less persistent inflammation, more maturation, and healthier new tissue as compared to the other groups over time. While still in its infancy, Friedman believes this technology will be brought from bench to bedside as it has been licensed by the company Nano Biomed Inc. "The reality is many impressive technologies fail to launch because the business and financial element aren't nurtured," says Friedman. "Nanotechnology in general has extraordinary potential to change the face of medicine, but it is unfortunately not enough to just have a good scientific basis or data." "Along this theme, it is in fact only through the unique structure of the nanomaterial herein investigated that allows for the generation of nitric oxide and confers the nitrosation capacity offered by the NAC-SNO-np," he concludes. Source: Nanowerk

Nano Dimension

July 29, 2015 - 10:02am
DirectoryWe all wish that developing multi-layer professional PCBs was faster and more flexible. That's why we're making a 3D PCB printer and a suite of nano-technology inks specifically for PCB professionals. The Nano Dimension PCB printer is a highly accurate and versatile inkjet deposition system for printing multi-layer circuit boards. The innovative hardware, dedicated nano-inks and novel software bring new possibilities to a wide range of R&D, prototyping and custom manufacturing projects. Our highly conductive silver nano-inks are also available separately. Nano Dimension has two fully equipped laboratories. One laboratory is dedicated to the research and production of conductive silver nano-particle inks. The second laboratory is focused on innovative dielectric nano-inks. The labs are focused primarily on nano-silver and nano-polymers for our 3D PCB printer but we can help you with your advanced ink requirements, so feel free to get in touch. Nano Dimension’s wet-chemistry approach to making silver nano-particles starts with a silver precursor raw material. The patented process, licensed from the Hebrew University, is highly efficient and very clean. We can reliably extract 10-100+ nano-meter sized particles of pure silver. Our labs can control the size, shape and dispersion of the silver nano-particles in accordance with your printing requirements. We can also formulate inks for a variety of substrates and printing profiles. Our high-performance silver nano-particle ink for inkjet printers is available for purchase/testing by industry partners seeking high conductivity for RFID, antenna, OLED and other applications. Address: Science Park 3 Golda Meir St. Ness-Ziona, 74036 Israel Type: IndustryEmail Address: contact@nano-di.comInterNano Taxonomy: Materials and Chemical Industries and Green ManufacturingElectronics and Semiconductor IndustriesTool developmentTags: printed electronicsnano-inksNano Silverinkjet printing3D printingPCB printer

Nanoparticles Accelerate and Improve Healing of Burn Wounds

July 29, 2015 - 7:56am
Skin thermal burns are a complex and major source of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in the United States, with 486,000 patients treated for burn injury each year. Given the range of causes, from fire associated injury to water scalding, patients often present with multiple and complex burns – wounds that often worsen and expand over the first few days do to the associated underlying inflammation and injury. "Though the impact of these injuries is large, our current treatment armament falls short, with gold standard treatments lacking evidence to support their use, or even worse, may even delay wound healing as was recently elucidated (http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v135/n5/full/jid201521a.html) with silver sulfadiazine," Dr. Adam Friedman (http://www.gwdocs.com/physicians/adam-friedman), Associate Professor of Dermatology and Director of Translational Research at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, tells Nanowerk. To address this gap, Friedman and colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine utilized a unique nanotechnology that can both release the potent biomolecule nitric oxide (NO) over time, as well as facilitate nitrosation, the addition of an NO group to a biological molecule, which is central many of NO’s activity. The team reported their findings in Journal of Drugs in Dermatology ("N-acetylcysteine S-nitrosothiol Nanoparticles Prevent Wound Expansion and Accelerate Wound Closure in a Murine Burn Model (http://jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961615P0726X/1)"). "The role of nitric oxide in wound healing is well established through all three phases," says Friedman. "Both NO itself and the act of nitrosation are exceedingly important in the transition from the inflammatory phase to the proliferative phase of wound healing. Therefore, we created a system that can do both." The scientists evaluated a previously described S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine containing hydrogel-based nanoparticle platform (NAC-SNO-np) on in vivo burn wound closure, expansion and inflammation in a multi burn model. Burn wound expansion in the NAC-SNO-np in coconut oil treated group was significantly attenuated compared to untreated control, coconut oil, and control-np groups. The clinically observed acceleration of wound healing was matched with the histologic evaluation of the burn wounds, with the NAC-SNO-np treated groups showing less persistent inflammation, more maturation, and healthier new tissue as compared to the other groups over time. While still in its infancy, Friedman believes this technology will be brought from bench to bedside as it has been licensed by the company Nano Biomed Inc. "The reality is many impressive technologies fail to launch because the business and financial element aren't nurtured," says Friedman. "Nanotechnology in general has extraordinary potential to change the face of medicine, but it is unfortunately not enough to just have a good scientific basis or data." "Along this theme, it is in fact only through the unique structure of the nanomaterial herein investigated that allows for the generation of nitric oxide and confers the nitrosation capacity offered by the NAC-SNO-np," he concludes. Source: Nanowerk (http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=40879.php)

NanoBCA Congratulates Winners of Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards

July 24, 2015 - 10:27am
Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCAThe NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like to congratulate the winners of the 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is recognizing landmark green chemistry technologies developed by industrial pioneers and leading scientists that turn climate risk and other environmental problems into business opportunities, spurring innovation and economic development. “From academia to business, we congratulate those who bring innovative solutions that will help solve some of the most critical environmental problems,” said Jim Jones, EPA’s Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “These innovations reduce the use of energy, hazardous chemicals and water, while cutting manufacturing costs and sparking investments. In some cases they turn pollution into useful products. Ultimately, these manufacturing processes and products are safer for people’s health and the environment. We will continue to work with the 2015 winners as their technologies are adopted in the marketplace.” The Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award winners were honored at a ceremony in Washington, DC. The winners and their innovative technologies are: Algenol in Fort Myers, Florida, is being recognized for developing a blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels. The algae uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters with sunlight and saltwater to create fuel while dramatically reducing the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, with no reliance on food crops as feedstocks. This is a win-win for the company, the public, and the environment. It has the potential to revolutionize this industry and reduce the carbon footprint of fuel production. Hybrid Coating Technologies/Nanotech Industries of Daly City, California, is being recognized for developing a safer, plant-based polyurethane for use on floors, furniture and in foam insulation. The technology eliminates the use of isocyanates, the number one cause of workplace asthma. This is already in production, is reducing VOC’s and costs, and is safer for people and the environment. LanzaTech in Skokie, Illinois, is being recognized for the development of a process that uses waste gas to produce fuels and chemicals, reducing companies’ carbon footprint. LanzaTech has partnered with Global Fortune 500 Companies and others to use this technology, including facilities that can each produce 100,000 gallons per year of ethanol, and a number of chemical ingredients for the manufacture of plastics. This technology is already a proven winner and has enormous potential for American industry. SOLTEX (Synthetic Oils and Lubricants of Texas) in Houston, Texas, is being recognized for developing a new chemical reaction process that eliminates the use of water and reduces hazardous chemicals in the production of additives for lubricants and gasoline. If widely used, this technology has the potential to eliminate millions of gallons of wastewater per year and reduce the use of a hazardous chemical by 50 percent. Renmatix in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, is being recognized for developing a process using supercritical water to more cost effectively break down plant material into sugars used as building blocks for renewable chemicals and fuels. This innovative low-cost process could result in a sizeable increase in the production of plant-based chemicals and fuels, and reduce the dependence on petroleum fuels. Professor Eugene Chen of Colorado State University is being recognized for developing a process that uses plant-based materials in the production of renewable chemicals and liquid fuels. This new technology is waste-free and metal-free. It offers significant potential for the production of renewable chemicals, fuels, and bioplastics that can be used in a wide range of safer industrial and consumer products. During the 20 years of the program, EPA has received more than 1500 nominations and presented awards to 104 technologies. Winning technologies are responsible for annually reducing the use or generation of more than 826 million pounds of hazardous chemicals, saving 21 billion gallons of water, and eliminating 7.8 billion pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent releases to air. An independent panel of technical experts convened by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute formally judged the 2015 submissions from among scores of nominated technologies and made recommendations to EPA for the 2015 winners. The 2015 awards event was held in conjunction with the 2015 Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. Please help us spread the word about the 2015 winners and their innovative technologies within your own communication channels and through social media and web. Feel free to share this message with your contacts and repost the social media content. Share the Twitter post. 2015 Presidential Green Chemistry Award winners blog. For more information on this year’s winners and those from the last two decades, visit http://www2.epa.gov/green-chemistry Once again, the NanoBCA is proud to congratulate our colleagues in the nanotechnology community.

NanoBCA Congratulates Winners of Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards

July 24, 2015 - 5:27am
The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (http://nanobca.org/) (NanoBCA) would like to congratulate the winners of the 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is recognizing landmark green chemistry technologies developed by industrial pioneers and leading scientists that turn climate risk and other environmental problems into business opportunities, spurring innovation and economic development. “From academia to business, we congratulate those who bring innovative solutions that will help solve some of the most critical environmental problems,” said Jim Jones, EPA’s Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “These innovations reduce the use of energy, hazardous chemicals and water, while cutting manufacturing costs and sparking investments. In some cases they turn pollution into useful products. Ultimately, these manufacturing processes and products are safer for people’s health and the environment. We will continue to work with the 2015 winners as their technologies are adopted in the marketplace.” The Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award winners were honored at a ceremony in Washington, DC. The winners and their innovative technologies are: Algenol in Fort Myers, Florida, is being recognized for developing a blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels. The algae uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters with sunlight and saltwater to create fuel while dramatically reducing the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, with no reliance on food crops as feedstocks. This is a win-win for the company, the public, and the environment. It has the potential to revolutionize this industry and reduce the carbon footprint of fuel production. Hybrid Coating Technologies/Nanotech Industries of Daly City, California, is being recognized for developing a safer, plant-based polyurethane for use on floors, furniture and in foam insulation. The technology eliminates the use of isocyanates, the number one cause of workplace asthma. This is already in production, is reducing VOC’s and costs, and is safer for people and the environment. LanzaTech in Skokie, Illinois, is being recognized for the development of a process that uses waste gas to produce fuels and chemicals, reducing companies’ carbon footprint. LanzaTech has partnered with Global Fortune 500 Companies and others to use this technology, including facilities that can each produce 100,000 gallons per year of ethanol, and a number of chemical ingredients for the manufacture of plastics. This technology is already a proven winner and has enormous potential for American industry. SOLTEX (Synthetic Oils and Lubricants of Texas) in Houston, Texas, is being recognized for developing a new chemical reaction process that eliminates the use of water and reduces hazardous chemicals in the production of additives for lubricants and gasoline. If widely used, this technology has the potential to eliminate millions of gallons of wastewater per year and reduce the use of a hazardous chemical by 50 percent. Renmatix in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, is being recognized for developing a process using supercritical water to more cost effectively break down plant material into sugars used as building blocks for renewable chemicals and fuels. This innovative low-cost process could result in a sizeable increase in the production of plant-based chemicals and fuels, and reduce the dependence on petroleum fuels. Professor Eugene Chen of Colorado State University is being recognized for developing a process that uses plant-based materials in the production of renewable chemicals and liquid fuels. This new technology is waste-free and metal-free. It offers significant potential for the production of renewable chemicals, fuels, and bioplastics that can be used in a wide range of safer industrial and consumer products. During the 20 years of the program, EPA has received more than 1500 nominations and presented awards to 104 technologies. Winning technologies are responsible for annually reducing the use or generation of more than 826 million pounds of hazardous chemicals, saving 21 billion gallons of water, and eliminating 7.8 billion pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent releases to air. An independent panel of technical experts convened by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute formally judged the 2015 submissions from among scores of nominated technologies and made recommendations to EPA for the 2015 winners. The 2015 awards event was held in conjunction with the 2015 Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. Please help us spread the word about the 2015 winners and their innovative technologies within your own communication channels and through social media and web. Feel free to share this message with your contacts and repost the social media content. Share the Twitter post (https://twitter.com/EPA/status/620652522844368896). 2015 Presidential Green Chemistry Award winners blog (https://blog.epa.gov/blog/2015/07/american-innovators/). For more information on this year’s winners and those from the last two decades, visit http://www2.epa.gov/green-chemistry (http://www2.epa.gov/green-chemistry) Once again, the NanoBCA is proud to congratulate our colleagues in the nanotechnology community.

DIRECTA PLUS S.p.A.

July 23, 2015 - 12:39pm
DirectoryDirecta Plus is a technological company which develops processes for the production of a new generation of graphene-based nanomaterials targeting existing global markets. - Develop innovative metal and carbon nanotechnology processes - Use R&D and collaborate with prestigious universities and commercial partners to refine the technology - Protect technology with a planned IP strategy Address: Parco Scientifico di ComoNExT Via Cavour 2 Lomazzo, 22074 Italy URL:  http://www.directa-plus.com Type: IndustryEmail Address: info@directa-plus.comPhone: +39 02 36714400InterNano Taxonomy: GrapheneMaterials and Chemical Industries and Green ManufacturingTags: graphene-based nanomaterials

Plantations of Nanorods on Carpets of Graphene Capture the Sun's Energy

July 17, 2015 - 10:23am
Prof. Juan Carlos Colmenares, Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of SciencesThe microscopic image of the novel 3D photocatalytic material, designed by scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, Poland, and the Fuzhou University, China. (Source: IPC PAS, Fuzhou University)The Sun can be a better chemist, thanks to zinc oxide nanorod arrays grown on a graphene substrate and "decorated" with dots of cadmium sulphide. In the presence of solar radiation, this combination of zero and one-dimensional semiconductor structures with two-dimensional graphene is a great catalyst for many chemical reactions. The innovative photocatalytic material has been developed by a group of scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw and Fuzhou University in China (Advanced Functional Materials, "Hierarchically CdS Decorated 1D ZnO Nanorods-2D Graphene Hybrids: Low Temperature Synthesis and Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance "). It's a strange forest. Simple, uniformly distributed trunks grow from a flat surface, rising long nanometres upwards to where crowns of semiconductors greedily capture every ray of Sun. That's the view seen through a microscope of the new photocatalytic material, developed by scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS) in Warsaw, Poland, and State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry at Fuzhou University, China. The novel 3D material has been designed so that during the processing of solar energy the best collaboration is achieved between the dots of cadmium sulphide (so-called zero-dimensional structures), the nanorods of zinc oxide (1D structures), and graphene (2D structures). The methods of converting light energy reaching the Earth from the Sun can be divided into two groups. In the photovoltaic group, photons are used for the direct generation of electrical energy. The photocatalytic approach is different: here radiation, both visible and ultraviolet, is used to activate chemical compounds and carry out reactions which store solar energy. In this manner it is possible to e.g. reduce CO2 to methanol, synthesize fuel or produce valuable organic intermediates for the chemical or pharmaceutical industry. The principle of operation of the new, three-dimensional photocatalyst, developed by the group from the IPC PAS and the University of Fuzhou, is simple. When a photon with the appropriate energy falls on the semiconductor - zinc oxide ZnO or cadmium sulphide CdS - an electron-hole pair forms. Under normal circumstances it would almost immediately recombine and the solar energy would be lost. However, in the new material electrons - released in both semiconductors as a result of interaction with the photons - quickly flow down along the nanorods to the graphene base, which is an excellent conductor. Recombination can not occur and the electrons can be used to create new chemical bonds and thus to synthesize new compounds. The actual chemical reaction takes place on the surface of the graphene, previously coated with the organic compounds which are to be processed. Zinc oxide only reacts with ultraviolet radiation, of which there is but a small percentage in sunlight. Therefore, researchers from the IPC PAS and Fuzhou University have also covered the nanorod forests with cadmium sulphide. This reacts primarily with visible light, of which there is approx. 10 times more than the ultraviolet - and this is the main supplier of electrons for the chemical reactions."Our photocatalytic material operates with a high yield. We usually add it to the compounds being processed in a ratio of about 1:10. After exposure to solar radiation within no more than half an hour we process 80% and sometimes even more than 90% of the substrates," stresses Prof. Yi-Jun Xu (FRSC) of Fuzhou University, where the majority of the experiments have been carried out by the research team led by him. "The great advantage of our photocatalyst is the ease of its production," in turn notes Prof. Juan Carlos Colmenares of the IPC PAS. "Graphene suitable for applications in photochemistry is now available without any greater problems and is not expensive. In turn, the process invented by us of coating graphene with plantations of zinc oxide nanorods, on which we subsequently deposit cadmium sulphide, is fast, efficient, takes place at a temperature just slightly higher than room temperature, at normal pressure, and does not require any sophisticated substrates." For application on a broader scale it is important that the new photocatalyst is consumed slowly. The experiments carried out to date show that only after the sixth-seventh use does a slight decrease of about 10% in the yield of the reaction occur. Skillfully used, the new 3D photocatalyst may significantly alter the course of chemical reactions. Its use, e.g. in the pharmaceutical industry, could reduce the number of stages of production of certain pharmacological compounds from a dozen to just a few. Reference:”Hierarchically CdS Decorated 1D ZnO Nanorods-2D Graphene Hybrids: Low Temperature Synthesis and Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance "; Ch. Han, Z. Chen, N. Zhang, J.C. Colmenares, Y-J. Xu; Advanced Functional Materials 2015, 25, 221–229; DOI:10.1002/adfm.201402443 . Source: Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Plantations of Nanorods on Carpets of Graphene Capture the Sun's Energy

July 17, 2015 - 5:23am
The Sun can be a better chemist, thanks to zinc oxide nanorod arrays grown on a graphene substrate and "decorated" with dots of cadmium sulphide. In the presence of solar radiation, this combination of zero and one-dimensional semiconductor structures with two-dimensional graphene is a great catalyst for many chemical reactions. The innovative photocatalytic material has been developed by a group of scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw and Fuzhou University in China (Advanced Functional Materials, "Hierarchically CdS Decorated 1D ZnO Nanorods-2D Graphene Hybrids: Low Temperature Synthesis and Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201402443) ").It's a strange forest. Simple, uniformly distributed trunks grow from a flat surface, rising long nanometres upwards to where crowns of semiconductors greedily capture every ray of Sun. That's the view seen through a microscope of the new photocatalytic material, developed by scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS) in Warsaw, Poland, and State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry at Fuzhou University, China. The novel 3D material has been designed so that during the processing of solar energy the best collaboration is achieved between the dots of cadmium sulphide (so-called zero-dimensional structures), the nanorods of zinc oxide (1D structures), and graphene (2D structures).The methods of converting light energy reaching the Earth from the Sun can be divided into two groups. In the photovoltaic group, photons are used for the direct generation of electrical energy. The photocatalytic approach is different: here radiation, both visible and ultraviolet, is used to activate chemical compounds and carry out reactions which store solar energy. In this manner it is possible to e.g. reduce CO2 to methanol, synthesize fuel or produce valuable organic intermediates for the chemical or pharmaceutical industry.The principle of operation of the new, three-dimensional photocatalyst, developed by the group from the IPC PAS and the University of Fuzhou, is simple. When a photon with the appropriate energy falls on the semiconductor - zinc oxide ZnO or cadmium sulphide CdS - an electron-hole pair forms. Under normal circumstances it would almost immediately recombine and the solar energy would be lost. However, in the new material electrons - released in both semiconductors as a result of interaction with the photons - quickly flow down along the nanorods to the graphene base, which is an excellent conductor. Recombination can not occur and the electrons can be used to create new chemical bonds and thus to synthesize new compounds. The actual chemical reaction takes place on the surface of the graphene, previously coated with the organic compounds which are to be processed.Zinc oxide only reacts with ultraviolet radiation, of which there is but a small percentage in sunlight. Therefore, researchers from the IPC PAS and Fuzhou University have also covered the nanorod forests with cadmium sulphide. This reacts primarily with visible light, of which there is approx. 10 times more than the ultraviolet - and this is the main supplier of electrons for the chemical reactions."Our photocatalytic material operates with a high yield. We usually add it to the compounds being processed in a ratio of about 1:10. After exposure to solar radiation within no more than half an hour we process 80% and sometimes even more than 90% of the substrates," stresses Prof. Yi-Jun Xu (FRSC) of Fuzhou University, where the majority of the experiments have been carried out by the research team led by him."The great advantage of our photocatalyst is the ease of its production," in turn notes Prof. Juan Carlos Colmenares of the IPC PAS. "Graphene suitable for applications in photochemistry is now available without any greater problems and is not expensive. In turn, the process invented by us of coating graphene with plantations of zinc oxide nanorods, on which we subsequently deposit cadmium sulphide, is fast, efficient, takes place at a temperature just slightly higher than room temperature, at normal pressure, and does not require any sophisticated substrates."For application on a broader scale it is important that the new photocatalyst is consumed slowly. The experiments carried out to date show that only after the sixth-seventh use does a slight decrease of about 10% in the yield of the reaction occur.Skillfully used, the new 3D photocatalyst may significantly alter the course of chemical reactions. Its use, e.g. in the pharmaceutical industry, could reduce the number of stages of production of certain pharmacological compounds from a dozen to just a few.Reference:”Hierarchically CdS Decorated 1D ZnO Nanorods-2D Graphene Hybrids: Low Temperature Synthesis and Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201402443) "; Ch. Han, Z. Chen, N. Zhang, J.C. Colmenares, Y-J. Xu; Advanced Functional Materials 2015, 25, 221–229; DOI:10.1002/adfm.201402443 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201402443) .Source: Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (http://ichf.edu.pl/press/2015/07/IChF150715a_EN.pdf)

FlexEnable Limited

July 13, 2015 - 11:39am
DirectoryFlexEnable has been launched to build on the world's best and industrially proven flexible electronics technology platform. This platform combines stable high performance transistors with passive elements to create truly flexible and cost effective electronics over large and small surfaces. With over a decade of experience, IP development and technology awards, FlexEnable works together with customers to drive innovation across flexible sensors, smart systems and video-rate displays. FlexEnable's proven technology platform enables new mobile products, wearables, surface displays and imaging systems. Address: Registered office 34 Cambridge Science Park Cambridge, CB4 0FX UK URL:  http://www.flexenable.com Type: IndustryPhone: +44 (0)1223 706-000Tags: Flexible electronicsTransistorsIP developmentflexible sensorssmart systemsvideo-rate displaysmobile productswearablessurface displaysimaging systems.

IBM Research Alliance Produces Industry’s First 7nm Node Test Chips

July 9, 2015 - 12:29pm
Christine Vu, IBM Media RelationsDr. Michael Liehr (left) of SUNY Polytechnic Institute's Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering and Bala Haran (right) of IBM Research inspect a wafer comprised of 7nm (nanometer) node test chips in a clean room in Albany, NY. IBM Research, working with alliance partners at SUNY Poly CNSE, has produced the semiconductor industry’s first 7nm node test chips with functional transistors. (Darryl Bautista/Feature Photo Service for IBM)An alliance led by IBM Research (NYSE:IBM) today announced that it has produced the semiconductor industry’s first 7nm (nanometer) node test chips with functioning transistors.  The breakthrough, accomplished in partnership with GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung at SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (SUNY Poly CNSE), could result in the ability to place more than 20 billion tiny switches -- transistors -- on the fingernail-sized chips that power everything from smartphones to spacecraft. To achieve the higher performance, lower power and scaling benefits promised by 7nm technology, researchers had to bypass conventional semiconductor manufacturing approaches. Among the novel processes and techniques pioneered by the IBM Research alliance were a number of industry-first innovations, most notably Silicon Germanium (SiGe) channel transistors and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography integration at multiple levels. Industry experts consider 7nm technology crucial to meeting the anticipated demands of future cloud computing and Big Data systems, cognitive computing, mobile products and other emerging technologies. Part of IBM’s $3 billion, five-year investment in chip R&D (announced in 2014), this accomplishment was made possible through a unique public-private partnership with New York State and joint development alliance with GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Samsung, and equipment suppliers. The team is based at SUNY Poly’s NanoTech Complex in Albany. “For business and society to get the most out of tomorrow’s computers and devices, scaling to 7nm and beyond is essential,” said Arvind Krishna, senior vice president and director of IBM Research. “That’s why IBM has remained committed to an aggressive basic research agenda that continually pushes the limits of semiconductor technology. Working with our partners, this milestone builds on decades of research that has set the pace for the microelectronics industry, and positions us to advance our leadership for years to come.” Microprocessors utilizing 22nm and 14nm technology power today’s servers, cloud data centers and mobile devices, and 10nm technology is well on the way to becoming a mature technology. The IBM Research-led alliance achieved close to 50 percent area scaling improvements over today’s most advanced technology, introduced SiGe channel material for transistor performance enhancement at 7nm node geometries, process innovations to stack them below 30nm pitch and full integration of EUV lithography at multiple levels. These techniques and scaling could result in at least a 50 percent power/performance improvement for next generation mainframe and POWER systems that will power the Big Data, cloud and mobile era. “Governor Andrew Cuomo’s trailblazing public-private partnership model is catalyzing historic innovation and advancement. Today’s announcement is just one example of our collaboration with IBM, which furthers New York State’s global leadership in developing next generation technologies,” said Dr. Michael Liehr, SUNY Poly Executive Vice President of Innovation and Technology and Vice President of Research.  “Enabling the first 7nm node transistors is a significant milestone for the entire semiconductor industry as we continue to push beyond the limitations of our current capabilities.” "Today’s announcement marks the latest achievement in our long history of collaboration to accelerate development of next-generation technology," said Gary Patton, CTO and Head of Worldwide R&D at GLOBALFOUNDRIES. "Through this joint collaborative program based at the Albany NanoTech Complex, we are able to maintain our focus on technology leadership for our clients and partners by helping to address the development challenges central to producing a smaller, faster, more cost efficient generation of semiconductors." The 7nm node milestone continues IBM’s legacy of historic contributions to silicon and semiconductor innovation. They include the invention or first implementation of the single cell DRAM, the Dennard Scaling Laws, chemically amplified photoresists, copper interconnect wiring, Silicon on Insulator, strained engineering, multi core microprocessors, immersion lithography, high speed SiGe, High-k gate dielectrics, embedded DRAM, 3D chip stacking and Air gap insulators. IBM and SUNY Poly have built a highly successful, globally recognized partnership at the multi-billion dollar Albany NanoTech Complex, highlighted by the institution's Center for Semiconductor Research (CSR), a $500 million program that also includes the world's leading nanoelectronics companies. The CSR is a long-term, multi-phase, joint R&D cooperative program on future computer chip technology. It continues to provide student scholarships and fellowships at the university to help prepare the next generation of nanotechnology scientists, researchers and engineers. For more information about SUNY Polytechnic Institute, visit www.sunycnse.com and www.sunypoly.edu . For more information on IBM Research, visit www.research.ibm.com. Contact(s) informationChristine VuIBM Media Relations1 (914) 945-2755vuch@us.ibm.com Source:  https://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/47301.wss