National Nanomanufacturing Network

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NanoHybrids Launches its First Product Line of Premium Gold Nanoparticles

December 2, 2014 - 4:23am
AUSTIN, TX NanoHybrids Corporation, a provider of nanotechnology-based contrast agents announced the launch of its new website and premium product line of gold nanoparticles specially designed to improve imaging results. The company’s initial technology platform was developed in collaboration with researchers from the Biomedical Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Austin and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. "Frustrated by inconsistent imaging results due to highly variable shape, size and other properties of commercially available gold nanoparticle contrast agents, our team has developed highly monodisperse gold nanorods and nanospheres that will help scientists obtain consistent and better quality data. We also have a policy of ‘no proprietary coatings’ which means that unlike some companies in this space, we offer full transparency on surface chemistry, making it easier for our customers to modify and use these particles depending on their application," says Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer Dr. Kimberly Homan. NanoHybrids’ offerings include an exclusive line of silica-coated gold nanorods that are quickly gaining popularity as contrast agents in photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging. As opposed to current preclinical imaging contrast agents on the market, NanoHybrids’ silica-coated nanorods resist melting and shape distortion even when subjected to extreme heat via focused laser beams. In addition to providing this enhanced thermodynamic stability, the silica-coating also facilitates better heat transfer to the surrounding fluid, thus dramatically increasing signal strength. Overall, these benefits make the company’s silica-coated gold nanorods an excellent contrast agent for not only in vitro and in vivo photoacoustic imaging but also many other applications involving continuous or pulsed lasers. The founders at NanoHybrids have decades of experience in biomedical imaging and have been pioneering the development of contrast agents alongside custom designed imaging systems. "Our products have been developed by imaging researchers, for researchers. As scientists ourselves, we understand the challenges involved when working with gold nanoparticles in imaging and strive to provide the highest possible level of quality and technical support," says Homan. (http://www.nanohybrids.net)About NanoHybrids Inc. NanoHybrids is an Austin-based company focused on commercializing nanotechnology solutions. The company’s current product line comprises of premium gold nanoparticles with specialized coatings, including a proprietary silica coating that provides colloidal stability, bioconjugation potential and enhanced optical properties. NanoHybrids’ gold nanoparticles are ideal for use in imaging, tumor targeting, microscopy, lateral flow assays, SERS, drug delivery research, sensors and several other high-technology applications within the fields of life science and materials science. http://www.nanohybrids.net (http://www.nanohybrids.net) Product Applications: http://nanohybrids.net/pages/applications (http://nanohybrids.net/pages/applications) Products: http://nanohybrids.net/collections/all-products (http://nanohybrids.net/collections/all-products) Contact information: info at nanohybrids.net (mailto:info@nanohybrids.net)

Director Named for National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

November 20, 2014 - 9:44am
The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications.“Dr. Meador’s background and experience identifying nanotechnology applications, combined with his long involvement with the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), will help us accelerate the NNI’s activities aimed at facilitating the commercialization of nanotechnology research sponsored by the Federal Government over the past decade,” said Dr. Lloyd Whitman, who has been serving as Interim NNCO Director and is now the Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Meador, chair of NASA’s Nanotechnology Roadmap Team, was instrumental in developing the NASA-wide Nanotechnology Project, and has been responsible for project planning and advocacy, overseeing technical progress, developing external partnerships to advance and transfer technology, coordinating with other nanotechnology related activities within NASA, and interacting with program and senior agency management. He has also played a key role in representing NASA in the NNI’s interagency activities, including co-chairing its Nanomanufacturing, Industry Liaison, and Innovation Working Group. During his long career at NASA, Dr. Meador has held a series of positions with increasing responsibility, including over twenty years as Chief of the Polymers Branch of the Materials Division at NASA Glenn Research Center, where he expanded the research portfolio of the branch from research in high-temperature stable polymers and composites for aircraft engines to include work in battery electrolytes, fuel cell membranes, and nonlinear optical and sensor materials. He also initiated the first nanotechnology program at NASA Glenn. Dr. Meador has been recognized as the NASA Glenn Small Disadvantaged Business Program Technical Advocate of the Year and NASA Small Business Program Technical Personnel of the Year. He has also received the NASA Equal Opportunity Employment Medal for his work to increase the involvement of faculty and students from minority serving institutions in NASA materials research, and last month was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for leading NASA's Nanotechnology R D activities and representing the agency as a proactive member of the NNI.Source: NNCO (http://www.nano.gov/node/1246) The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications. - See more at: http://www.nano.gov/node/1246#sthash.LAEDWssg.dpufThe National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications. “Dr. Meador’s background and experience identifying nanotechnology applications, combined with his long involvement with the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), will help us accelerate the NNI’s activities aimed at facilitating the commercialization of nanotechnology research sponsored by the Federal Government over the past decade,” said Dr. Lloyd Whitman, who has been serving as Interim NNCO Director and is now the Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Meador, chair of NASA’s Nanotechnology Roadmap Team, was instrumental in developing the NASA-wide Nanotechnology Project, and has been responsible for project planning and advocacy, overseeing technical progress, developing external partnerships to advance and transfer technology, coordinating with other nanotechnology related activities within NASA, and interacting with program and senior agency management. He has also played a key role in representing NASA in the NNI’s interagency activities, including co-chairing its Nanomanufacturing, Industry Liaison, and Innovation Working Group. During his long career at NASA, Dr. Meador has held a series of positions with increasing responsibility, including over twenty years as Chief of the Polymers Branch of the Materials Division at NASA Glenn Research Center, where he expanded the research portfolio of the branch from research in high-temperature stable polymers and composites for aircraft engines to include work in battery electrolytes, fuel cell membranes, and nonlinear optical and sensor materials. He also initiated the first nanotechnology program at NASA Glenn. Dr. Meador has been recognized as the NASA Glenn Small Disadvantaged Business Program Technical Advocate of the Year and NASA Small Business Program Technical Personnel of the Year. He has also received the NASA Equal Opportunity Employment Medal for his work to increase the involvement of faculty and students from minority serving institutions in NASA materials research, and last month was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for leading NASA's Nanotechnology R D activities and representing the agency as a proactive member of the NNI. - See more at: http://www.nano.gov/node/1246#sthash.QpleixbX.dpufhe National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications. “Dr. Meador’s background and experience identifying nanotechnology applications, combined with his long involvement with the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), will help us accelerate the NNI’s activities aimed at facilitating the commercialization of nanotechnology research sponsored by the Federal Government over the past decade,” said Dr. Lloyd Whitman, who has been serving as Interim NNCO Director and is now the Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Meador, chair of NASA’s Nanotechnology Roadmap Team, was instrumental in developing the NASA-wide Nanotechnology Project, and has been responsible for project planning and advocacy, overseeing technical progress, developing external partnerships to advance and transfer technology, coordinating with other nanotechnology related activities within NASA, and interacting with program and senior agency management. He has also played a key role in representing NASA in the NNI’s interagency activities, including co-chairing its Nanomanufacturing, Industry Liaison, and Innovation Working Group. During his long career at NASA, Dr. Meador has held a series of positions with increasing responsibility, including over twenty years as Chief of the Polymers Branch of the Materials Division at NASA Glenn Research Center, where he expanded the research portfolio of the branch from research in high-temperature stable polymers and composites for aircraft engines to include work in battery electrolytes, fuel cell membranes, and nonlinear optical and sensor materials. He also initiated the first nanotechnology program at NASA Glenn. Dr. Meador has been recognized as the NASA Glenn Small Disadvantaged Business Program Technical Advocate of the Year and NASA Small Business Program Technical Personnel of the Year. He has also received the NASA Equal Opportunity Employment Medal for his work to increase the involvement of faculty and students from minority serving institutions in NASA materials research, and last month was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for leading NASA's Nanotechnology R D activities and representing the agency as a proactive member of the NNI. - See more at: http://www.nano.gov/node/1246#sthash.QpleixbX.dpufhe National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications. “Dr. Meador’s background and experience identifying nanotechnology applications, combined with his long involvement with the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), will help us accelerate the NNI’s activities aimed at facilitating the commercialization of nanotechnology research sponsored by the Federal Government over the past decade,” said Dr. Lloyd Whitman, who has been serving as Interim NNCO Director and is now the Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Meador, chair of NASA’s Nanotechnology Roadmap Team, was instrumental in developing the NASA-wide Nanotechnology Project, and has been responsible for project planning and advocacy, overseeing technical progress, developing external partnerships to advance and transfer technology, coordinating with other nanotechnology related activities within NASA, and interacting with program and senior agency management. He has also played a key role in representing NASA in the NNI’s interagency activities, including co-chairing its Nanomanufacturing, Industry Liaison, and Innovation Working Group. During his long career at NASA, Dr. Meador has held a series of positions with increasing responsibility, including over twenty years as Chief of the Polymers Branch of the Materials Division at NASA Glenn Research Center, where he expanded the research portfolio of the branch from research in high-temperature stable polymers and composites for aircraft engines to include work in battery electrolytes, fuel cell membranes, and nonlinear optical and sensor materials. He also initiated the first nanotechnology program at NASA Glenn. Dr. Meador has been recognized as the NASA Glenn Small Disadvantaged Business Program Technical Advocate of the Year and NASA Small Business Program Technical Personnel of the Year. He has also received the NASA Equal Opportunity Employment Medal for his work to increase the involvement of faculty and students from minority serving institutions in NASA materials research, and last month was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for leading NASA's Nanotechnology R D activities and representing the agency as a proactive member of the NNI. - See more at: http://www.nano.gov/node/1246#sthash.QpleixbX.dpufhe National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Meador as its new Director. Dr. Meador joins NNCO on a detail from NASA, where he has been managing the Nanotechnology Project in the Game Changing Technology Program, a project involving five NASA centers, industry, and universities working to mature nanotechnologies with high potential for impact on NASA missions and to demonstrate them in selected applications. “Dr. Meador’s background and experience identifying nanotechnology applications, combined with his long involvement with the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), will help us accelerate the NNI’s activities aimed at facilitating the commercialization of nanotechnology research sponsored by the Federal Government over the past decade,” said Dr. Lloyd Whitman, who has been serving as Interim NNCO Director and is now the Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Meador, chair of NASA’s Nanotechnology Roadmap Team, was instrumental in developing the NASA-wide Nanotechnology Project, and has been responsible for project planning and advocacy, overseeing technical progress, developing external partnerships to advance and transfer technology, coordinating with other nanotechnology related activities within NASA, and interacting with program and senior agency management. He has also played a key role in representing NASA in the NNI’s interagency activities, including co-chairing its Nanomanufacturing, Industry Liaison, and Innovation Working Group. During his long career at NASA, Dr. Meador has held a series of positions with increasing responsibility, including over twenty years as Chief of the Polymers Branch of the Materials Division at NASA Glenn Research Center, where he expanded the research portfolio of the branch from research in high-temperature stable polymers and composites for aircraft engines to include work in battery electrolytes, fuel cell membranes, and nonlinear optical and sensor materials. He also initiated the first nanotechnology program at NASA Glenn. Dr. Meador has been recognized as the NASA Glenn Small Disadvantaged Business Program Technical Advocate of the Year and NASA Small Business Program Technical Personnel of the Year. He has also received the NASA Equal Opportunity Employment Medal for his work to increase the involvement of faculty and students from minority serving institutions in NASA materials research, and last month was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for leading NASA's Nanotechnology R D activities and representing the agency as a proactive member of the NNI. - See more at: http://www.nano.gov/node/1246#sthash.QpleixbX.dpuf

Nanoimprint lithography for the fabrication of efficient low band gap polymer solar cells

November 13, 2014 - 7:55am
In recent years, polymer solar cells have drawn considerable research interest due to their attractive features including flexibility, semi-transparency, and manufacturability using cost-effective continuous printing processes (read more: "The state of nanoimprinted polymer organic solar cell technology (http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=28622.php)"). However, one challenge limiting their commercialization is the relatively low power conversion efficiency when compared to inorganic solar cells."One of the causes for polymer solar cells' low performance is the difficulty to simultaneously realize donor-acceptor phase separation within the short exciton diffusion length (∼10 nm) and high charge mobility, especially hole mobility, which are critical for charge separation and transport," Yi Yang, a senior engineer at Globalfoundries, tells Nanowerk. "So far it has been impossible to achieve such a morphology in the most widely used bulk heterojunction structure in which randomly distributed phases cause significant charge recombination." New work, led by Walter Hu (http://www.ee.utdallas.edu/people/facultypages/Hu.html), an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, and Anvar Zakhidov (http://nanotech.utdallas.edu/personnel/staff/zakhidov.html), a professor of physics, both at UT Dallas, shows that nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an effective technique to solve these issues simultaneously. The results, recently published in ACS Applied Materials Interfaces ("Efficient Low Bandgap Polymer Solar Cell with Ordered Heterojunction Defined by Nanoimprint Lithography" (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1021/am505303a)), show that low bandgap polymer solar cells with high efficiency of 5.5% can be fabricated using NIL. "Taking into account the fact that low bandgap polymers are becoming the main stream for this type of solar cell, we believe this technique will increasingly find more applications," says Yang. In a previous study ("How nanostructure geometry affects polymer photovoltaic device efficiency (http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=36631.php)"), the researchers focused on nanoimprinted P3HT solar cells. After carefully optimizing the nanostructure geometry, they achieved an efficiency of 3-4%, which is not as high as the efficiency record (over 4%) other groups have achieved with this polymer. In the new study, they extended their technique to low bandgap polymer solar cells and realized a high efficiency up to 5.5%, which is among the best efficiencies for this polymer reported in the literature. This result indicates that nanoimprint fabrication works better for low bandgap polymer solar cells. In the new work, the team demonstrates the feasibility of using nanoimprint lithography to make efficient low bandgap polymer solar cells with well-ordered heterojunction. They fabricate high-quality low bandgap conjugated polymer (PCPDTBT) nanogratings using this technique for the first time. "We found that NIL makes PCPDTBT chains interact more strongly and form an improved structural ordering," says Yang. "Solar cells made with the highest aspect ratio PCPDTBT nanostructures show a high power conversion efficiency of 5.5%. They are the most efficient nanoimprinted polymer solar cells, as well as the best reported solar cells using the same material." Nanoimprint lithography has emerged as an effective fabrication technique to precisely define the nanomorphology in polymer solar cells. Controlled chain ordering as well as a bicontinuous and interdigitized heterojunction can be achieved by imprinting conjugated polymers, where a nanoimprint induced chain alignment is present, followed by infiltrating fullerene into patterned polymer nanostructures. However, as Yang notes, most studies so far have focused on nanoimprinted P3HT/fullerene solar cells. "This material combination is not ideal due to a mismatch between the absorption of P3HT and solar spectrum, which has a maximum photon flux at 1.6-1.8 eV while P3HT has a relatively large bandgap of 1.9-2.0 eV," he explains. "A bandgap of 1.3-1.5 eV is considered to be ideal for polymer-fullerene solar cells." In recent years, many low bandgap polymers have been synthesized with record-breaking efficiencies. However, as Yang points out, it has been proven that the donor and acceptor phase separation for these polymers cannot be realized by thermal or solvent vapor annealing, which is usually carried out on P3HT/fullerene solar cells. Although additives such as 1,8-octanedithiol are added into the solution to help separate donor and acceptor domains, this separation cannot be controlled precisely. Therefore, NIL would provide an effective solution if an ordered active layer morphology could be formed by it. However, so far no results have been published that show that NIL can be applied to a wide variety of materials in the polymer solar cell field. Now, the UT Dallas team has utilized NIL to pattern the low bandgap (1.4 eV) solar cell polymer PCPDTBT. For the first time, they have used NIL to fabricate high quality nanogratings for this polymer. "After carefully optimizing the nanograting geometry, we were able to achieve a high solar cell efficiency of 5.5%," notes Yang. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that NIL is not only limited to solar cells made of the most widely studied polymer P3HT, but also can be applied to a wide variety of materials used in the fabrication of polymer solar cells – low bandgap polymers can also be patterned by this technique to make efficient devices. Despite considerable effort, the highest reported power conversion efficiencies obtained from nanoimprinted P3HT solar cells have been in the 3-4% range. These values are lower than the highest values (∼4-5%) when the same polymer is used in a bulk heterojunction structure. "This indicates that NIL works better for low bandgap polymer solar cells," says Yang. "One possible explanation is that the method of using thermal or solvent vapor annealing to control the phase separation in P3HT based bulk heterojunction solar cells is very effective, as shown by a number of studies; while that of using additives in the low bandgap polymer solar cells is not, as described in literature." "This less effective approach leaves NIL more space to demonstrate its advantage in improving the solar cell performance when compared to the bulk heterojunction structure," he concludes. "This is our preliminary thinking and more studies are required to understand these different behaviors. Also as predicted in our recent study, a larger interface area between polymer and fullerene is preferable for efficient devices. A practical way to further increase it is needed as well. Our future work will focus on these aspects." Source: Nanowerk (http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=38076.php)

Call for Presentations for Int'l Conf. on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials

November 13, 2014 - 4:30am
(http://www.tappi.org/15Nano) What’s New for 2015 Two Tracks for Presentations: As the Nano Conference continues to grow, this year there will be two tracks to guide attendees in choosing sessions to attend. The Fundamental Research Track will focus on new technical advances in characterization, isolation, functionalities and other properties of renewable and sustainable nanomaterials. The Industry Applications Track will focus on manufacturing applications, new markets, and other end user issues. The conference organizers have extended the Call for Submissions (https://www.eiseverywhere.com/file_uploads/7a30b75854987d218fd0996b1a0895f6_Nano2015CallForPresentations-Extension.pdf) .Abstracts are due by 1 December 2014. New Technology and Product Showcase: Promote your new products or technologies at this special session. Sponsors and exhibitors will be given priority for available slots. See the Call for Submissions tab for more details. Research Perspectives and Business Acumen Seminar: Designed for academics, this workshop will show how researchers can gain industrial support for their projects. Led by corporate R D directors, this workshop will have limited seating. Check the website for additional details. Plan to AttendExplore a world of possibilities for opening the door to new markets by unlocking the potential of renewable biomaterials. TAPPI’s tenth International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials is the only event that explores how nanotechnology can transform biomaterials into high-value products that expand and transcend traditional forest products portfolios. Bringing together leading researchers, industry experts, government representatives and other stakeholders from around the world, this year’s event promises a unique, multi-disciplinary look at the rewards of using nanotechnology – from the forest to marketed products. Whether your focus is new product development, academic study or supplier research, this year’s conference will provide the big picture for unlocking value from this tiny technology. Conference Co-Chairs:Sean Ireland, Verso Paper (USA)Yaman Boluk, University of Alberta (Canada)Alain Dufresne, Grenoble Institute of Technology (France)Celebrating 100 Years of TAPPI!To honor TAPPI's 100th anniversary in 2015, the 2015 Conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. TAPPI headquarters are located in Peachtree Corners, a northern suburb of Atlanta.

Haydale Acquires EPL Composite Solutions Ltd to Advance Graphene Commercialization Capabilities

November 6, 2014 - 5:03am
Haydale (http://www.internano.org/index.php?option=com_internanodirectory task=vieworg id=777 Itemid=179) , the company focused on the commercialisation of graphenes and other nanomaterials, has announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire EPL Composite Solutions (EPL), a specialist in the design, development and commercialisation of advanced composite polymer materials both in the UK and overseas. This acquisition will maximise EPL’s access to the nano-enhanced composites market and is expected to significantly boost Haydale’s sales potential. Haydale and EPL have already collaborated on a number of projects, and the acquisition of EPL is a significant step towards monetising Haydale’s proprietary technology for incorporating graphene and other nano-enhancing fillers into composites. The introduction of nanofillers to EPL’s product range will produce the added benefits of impermeable barriers, conductivity and reduced weight with improved strength and stiffness. These benefits are set to have a great impact on the development of future composite structures, with significant potential for the aerospace and automotive industries. Haydale’s tailored functionalisation capability allows solutions to be customised on three levels – raw material, functional group and level of functionalisation – which adds a powerful addition to the features and benefits of the products EPL produce for their clients. With recent estimates from market research firm IDTechEx forecasting a market value of $80m for nano-enhanced composites by 2018, graphene functionalisation promises to generate significant revenues as nano-reinforcement is adopted by greater numbers of composites manufacturers. Over the past 22 years, EPL has worked with global companies and has developed a reputation for delivering innovative solutions for commercial applications of advanced polymer composite materials. With customers spanning the oil and gas, water and energy sectors as well as the marine and transportation markets, EPL provides an entire development cycle from applied research, product design, process development, product testing and certification, to setting up manufacturing plants. EPL also works with OEMs and end-users to develop and provide composite solutions which show demonstrable clear technical, economic and environmental benefits over existing structures currently manufactured using traditional materials such as steel, aluminium, wood or concrete. Ray Gibbs, CEO at Haydale, commented; “This acquisition is a major step towards securing sales in the global composites market. The rapidly growing composites industry is known for the early adoption of new technologies and is one of the major markets known for its willingness to embrace disruptive technology and introduce innovative new materials. The Aerospace Corporation in the USA, has already independently verified that graphene functionalised using our patented applied-for process can enable the development of lighter, stronger composite materials – the acquisition of EPL gives us direct access to this emerging, growing market. The credibility of our plasma process has been further boosted by the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL), which has recently confirmed the capability of our process to add compatible chemical groups on the surface of GNPs: known as functionalisation. ” He continued; “We have acquired EPL because it provides us with an immediate route into the fast moving and dynamic composites market together with a substantial R D resource and dedicated composite and polymer expertise to boost our current in-house capability. Our solution’s capability, when added to the technical competence and credibility of EPL, is set to be a powerful force in the composites market. Our strategy is to provide solutions that enable the commercialisation of graphene in key strategic markets, and our recent collaboration with the speciality inks and coatings solutions provider, the Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating (WCPC), addresses one of these key strategic markets. The acquisition of EPL, together with our WCPC association, gives us entry into the two substantial industries known for the early adoption of new technologies. This offers us exciting opportunities for securing revenues and consolidating our position as a leader in the commercialisation of graphene.” Gerry Boyce, Managing Director of EPL added; “We have been working closely with Haydale since the beginning of 2014 testing their materials and have been very impressed with their technology. The composite industry is always looking for innovative technology and has long recognised the benefits of using nano materials in composites. Haydale’s proprietary technology, as verified by Aerospace Corp and NPL, opens up a range of opportunities in the composites world not previously available to EPL”. Based in Loughborough, EPL has 17 scientists and technicians providing Haydale with access to a well-regarded and recognised R D operation. Recent work conducted by Haydale in collaboration with EPL using a standard epoxy resin mixed with Haydale functionalised GNPs achieved over a 200% improvement in ultimate tensile strength, using just 2% loading of Haydale’s GNPs. Due to the brittle nature of unreinforced composites, these results could have significant implications for the development of future composite structures, demonstrating the potential in future aircraft design for weight saving and the consequent environmental benefits such as reductions in CO2 emissions. Having demonstrated these excellent results Haydale can take advantage of EPLs high profile client list, to provide high-performance composite solutions to major players in the composites industry including , National Grid, SSE, Eirgrid, Chevron, Anglian Water, Severn Trent Water, Yorkshire Water and 3M. Source: Haydale News Stories (http://www.haydale.com/media/news-stories/haydale-acquires-epl-composite-solutions/)