National Nanomanufacturing Network

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InterNano is an open-source online information clearinghouse for the nanomanufacturing research and development (R&D) community in the United States. It is designed provide this community with an array of tools and collections relevant to its work and to the development of viable nanomanufacturing applications.
Updated: 5 hours 11 min ago

Making graphene work for real-world devices

April 24, 2014 - 9:07am
Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the carbon material graphite, has been hailed as a wonder material--strong, light, nearly transparent and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat--and it very well may be. But a number of practical challenges must be overcome before it can emerge as a replacement for silicon and other materials in microprocessors and next-generation energy devices.One particular challenge concerns the question of how graphene sheets can be utilized in real devices. When you fabricate devices using graphene, you have to support the graphene on a substrate and doing so actually suppresses the high thermal conductivity of graphene, said Li Shi, a professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, whose work is partially funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

NBMC Workshop - Wearable Electronics Technology & Applications in Health & Human Performance

April 24, 2014 - 5:13am
Join this workshop to examine the growing interest and technical advancements in flexible electronics for wearable health and human performance sensors, including biometric and biomarkers sensors.

Thinnest Feasible Membrane Produced

April 24, 2014 - 4:58am
A new nano-membrane made out of the “super material” graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The membrane produced by the researchers at ETH Zurich is as thin as is technologically possible.

Livermore Lab shines new light on novel additive manufacturing approach

April 17, 2014 - 3:18am
For nearly a century, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been used as a method of coating material by depositing particles of various substances onto the surfaces of various manufactured items. One of the most common and oldest processes that utilize EPD is the application of a primer coat to new car bodies on a production assembly line. The body of the car is positively charged while the liquid primer in the dunk tank is negatively charged, forcing the attraction of the primer to the metal surface.

U.S. National Nanotechnology Coordination Office Seeks Next Director

April 9, 2014 - 11:22am
The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) in the Executive Office of the President is seeking candidates interested in serving as the Director of the U.S. National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO). The NNCO supports the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), the U.S. Federal Government’s interagency activity for coordinating research and development as well as enhancing communication and collaborative activities in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology. The NNCO acts as the primary point of contact for information on the NNI; provides technical and administrative support to the Initiative, including the preparation of multiagency planning, budget, and assessment documents; develops, updates, and maintains the NNI website www.nano.gov (http://www.nano.gov); and provides public outreach on behalf of the NNI. The NNCO is currently hosted by the National Science Foundation with offices in Arlington, Virginia.

12th Annual NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 2014 DC Roundtable

April 9, 2014 - 9:08am
NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) returns to Washington, DC for our 2014 DC Roundtable May 6-7th. This will be our 12th visit, dating back to 2002, meeting with numerous government officials in regard to the National Nanotechnology Initiative (http://nano.gov/) (NNI).

Cheap, Better-Performing Lithium-ion Batteries with Nanowires

April 3, 2014 - 10:22am
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have improved the performance and capacity of lithium batteries by developing better-performing, cheaper materials for use in anodes and cathodes (negative and positive electrodes, respectively). Lithium-ion batteries are a popular type of rechargeable battery commonly found in portable electronics and electric or hybrid cars. Traditionally, lithium-ion batteries contain a graphite anode, but silicon has recently emerged as a promising anode substitute because it is the second most abundant element on earth and has a theoretical capacity of 3600 milliamp hours per gram (mAh/g), almost 10 times the capacity of graphite. The capacity of a lithium-ion battery is determined by how many lithium ions can be stored in the cathode and anode. Using silicon in the anode increases the battery’s capacity dramatically because one silicon atom can bond up to 3.75 lithium ions, whereas with a graphite anode six carbon atoms are needed for every lithium atom. The USC Viterbi team developed a cost-effective (and therefore commercially viable) silicon anode with a stable capacity above 1100 mAh/g for extended 600 cycles, making their anode nearly three times more powerful and longer lasting than a typical commercial anode.