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Directa Plus and Colmar launch Second Collection of Graphene-enhanced Sportswear

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
New Technologic G+ ski jacket selected as Gold Winner at ISPO Munich Directa Plus plc (AIM: DCTA) (“Directa Plus” or the “Company”), a producer and supplier of...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Engineers develop low-cost, flexible terahertz radiation source for fast, non-invasive screening

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Novel invention presents promising applications in spectroscopy, safety surveillance, cancer diagnosis, imaging and communication.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

‘Dialing-In’ Wet Processing Parameters for MEMS, Nano Manufacturing and R&D

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
ArticleTechnology companies experience benefits from using wet processing equipment designed to handle a variety of application parameters.Contributed Author: Louise Bertagnolli, president of JST Manufacturing Topics: Nanotechnology
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoscribe 3D Prints Micro-Optics at the Nanoscale - 3DPrint.com

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
3DPrint.comNanoscribe 3D Prints Micro-Optics at the Nanoscale3DPrint.comNanoscale fabrication (nanofabrication) is a series of technologies being developed to make structures and even machines ranging in size from about one to a hundred nanometers. Nanoprinting usually refers to 3D printing/additive manufacturing being ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

European nanotechnology project to design less toxic photovoltaic materials (w/video)

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Project Sunflower's objective has been the development of organic photovoltaic materials less toxic and viable for industrial production.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Wearable, low-cost nanowire sensor to measure skin hydration

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have developed a wearable, wireless sensor that can monitor a person's skin hydration for use in applications that need to detect dehydration before it poses a health problem.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Water-based and biocompatible 2D inks for printed electronics

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have developed a method of producing water-based and inkjet printable 2D material inks, which could bring 2D crystal heterostructures from the lab into real-world products.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Big plans for nanotechnology - The Kingston Whig-Standard

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
The Kingston Whig-StandardBig plans for nanotechnologyThe Kingston Whig-StandardRobert Knobel, a professor of physics at Queen's University and lead researcher at NanoFabrication Kingston (formerly Kingston Nano-Fabrication Laboratory), leads a tour through the rebranded and revamped research space at Innovation Park on Thursday ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Imprinting nano patterns on the inside and outside of polymer fibers

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have come up with a simple and innovative technique for drawing or imprinting complex, nanometric patterns on hollow polymer fibers.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New solution for making 2D nanomaterials

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Lquids can be used to apply the 2D nanomaterials over large areas and at low costs, enabling a variety of important future applications.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Taking materials into the third dimension

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
One-pot technique creates structures with potential for more efficient manufacturing and energy storage.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A nanotechnology approach to purifying liquid crystals

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Liquid crystals used in modern devices such as laptops, tablets and smartphones typically contain a small fraction of ionic contaminants. These ion contaminants can originate from multiple sources during the chemical synthesis of materials, in the process of assembling the device, and in its daily use. In the case of LCDs, mobile ions in liquid crystals lead to such undesirable effects as image sticking, image flickering, and slow response. A promising solution to reduce the concentration of mobile ions in liquid crystal devices can be found by merging liquid crystals and nanotechnology.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoparticles improve melting and solidification for manufacturing processes

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
In an advance that could lead to improved manufacturing, a new study shows that adding nanoparticles to metals during the melting process allows for better control during melting.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New low-cost technique converts bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
A simple technique for producing oxide nanowires directly from bulk materials could dramatically lower the cost of producing the one-dimensional nanostructures.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Ultra-fast, ultra-sensitive platinum selenide gas sensors

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have demonstrated ultrafast and highly sensitive gas sensors using platinum selenide. This material - a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) - has promising potential in different areas of nanoelectronics, including optoelectonics as well as sensing.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

U.S. EPA finalizes reporting and record keeping requirements on nanoscale materials

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
For the first time, EPA is using TSCA to collect existing exposure and health and safety information on chemicals currently in the marketplace when manufactured or processed as nanoscale materials.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Disposable biosensors made from newspaper

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Paper, probably the cheapest and most widely used flexible and eco-friendly material in daily life, is a promising substrate for making flexible devices ranging from electronics to microfluidics, energy storage and sensors. In new work, researchers have developed a new and reliable method to achieve conformal coating of individual cellulose fibers in the paper and the fabrication of a metal electrode via patterning of gold and silver layers on the coated paper.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Molybdenum-Disulfide 2D Transistors Go Ballistic

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 2D nanomaterial pulls ahead with working registers and latch circuits and devices that let electrons zip through unimpeded Image: Stanford University Molybdenum disulfide, a two dimensional semiconductor that’s just 3 atoms thick, has had a big year. In October, a group of researchers made a 1-nanometer transistor from the material, showing that even if silicon transistors stop shrinking, the new material might provide a path forward. In December, at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco, researchers presented work they say shows that molybdenum disulfide not only makes for superlative single transistors, but can be made into complex circuits using realistic manufacturing methods. At the meeting, a group from Stanford showed that transistors made from large sheets of MoS2 can be used to make transistors with 10-nanometer-long, gate having electronic properties that approach the material’s theoretical limits. The devices displayed traits close to ballistic conduction, a state of very low electrical resistance that allows the unimpeded flow of charge over relatively long distances—a phenomenon that should lead to speedy circuits. Separately, a team from MIT demonstrated complex circuit elements made from MoS2 transistors. Most of the work on molybdenum disulfide so far has been what Stanford electrical engineer Eric Pop calls “Powerpoint devices.” These one-off devices, made by hand in the lab, have terrific performance that looks great in a slide. This step is an important one, says Pop, but the 2D material is now maturing. Image: Stanford University The Stanford lab’s transistors are not as small as the record-breaking ones demonstrated in October. What’s significant, says group leader Pop, is that these latest transistors maintained similar performance even though they were made using more industrial-type techniques. Instead of using Scotch tape to peel off a layer of molybdenum disulfide from a rock of the material, then carefully placing it down and crafting one transistor at a time, Pop’s grad student started by growing a large sheet of the material on a wafer of silicon. In a transistor, a gate electrode switches the semiconductor channel between conducting and insulating states. In the Stanford device, the tricky part was coming up with an easy way to make a small gate atop the molybdenum disulfide without harming it, says Pop. That is, until his student, Christopher English, realized they could harness the power of rust. English chose a somewhat unusual material, aluminum, to serve as the gate electrode. He deposited a 20-nanometer finger of aluminum on the molybdenum, then allowed it to oxidize and shrink down to a smaller size. The gate ends up being about 10 nanometers. At these relatively small dimensions, the molybdenum disulfide transistors approach their ultimate electrical limit, a state called ballistic conduction. When a device is small enough (or at low enough temperature), electrons will travel through the conducting medium without scattering because of collisions with the atoms that make up the material. Transistors operating ballistically should switch very fast and enable high-performance processors. Pop estimates that about 1 in 5 electrons moves though the rusty transistors ballistically. By further improving the quality of the material (or making the transistors smaller), he expects that ratio to improve. The important thing, he says, is the way they achieved this: using methods that could translate to larger scales. “We have all the ingredients we need to scale this up,” says Pop. Zippy nanoscale transistors are great on their own, but they’re useful only if you can build them into circuits.  Researchers from MIT demonstrated just that by constructing working registers and latches. They managed the feat, says electrical engineer Dina El-Damak, by creating computer-aided design software tailored to MoS2. This sort of software is common in the silicon world and enables designers to come up with new circuits relatively easily. (El-Damak worked on the molybdenum disulfide project at MIT and is now a professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.) Since molybdenum disulfide is so new, not many circuit designers have worked with the material. So far, most work has been done by trial and error, one device at a time. The MIT group can create an informed circuit design, using their computer models to simulate the best and worst cases, based on the material’s known properties and the performance of previous devices, says El-Damak. Then the group fabricates the design that seems most likely to work, tests its performance, and feeds the results back into the program. “By doing this, we have more confidence in scaling up this technology,” she says. Both Pop and El-Damak say molybdenum disulfide is unlikely to be a direct replacement for silicon. The material will either be used to build complementary systems on top of silicon chips, or it will be used on its own in flexible, transparent electronics. It’s also possible that some other 2D semiconductor will end up being a better option. Molybdenum disulfide is a few steps ahead because researchers have worked with it more than, say, tungsten selenide, and know how to grow the material over large areas. The Stanford and MIT research demonstrates important progress in this field, says Deji Akinwande, an electrical engineer at the University of Texas at Austin who co-chaired the IEDM session on 1D and 2D devices. People who work in industry are always asking when these materials will be made into useful circuits, and now it’s happening, he says. “Industry is starting to take this more seriously, now that it’s no longer just the grad student in the basement working on it,” he says.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Efficient nanowire solution for a big-name pollutant

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers designed an extremely efficient catalytic system to remove carbon monoxide.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Imec and Besi Demonstrate Long-Term Reliability of Ni-Cu-Ag Plated Solar Modules

InterNano Industry News - February 18, 2017 - 4:45am
Drunen (The Netherlands) and Leuven (Belgium)—January 3, 2017—Today, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics, energy and digital technology imec (partner in...
Categories: Nanotechnology News