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Phase matching boosts parametric amplifier

Nanotechweb - October 20, 2014 - 2:44am
California team has designed the first low-noise, high-gain, broad-bandwidth microwave Josephson travelling wave PA.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

QD Vision Wins Prestigious Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
QD Vision, Inc., the leading manufacturer of quantum dot optical components for LCD products, has won the 2014 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agenc...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
As in Alice's journey through the looking-glass to Wonderland, mirrors in the real world can sometimes behave in surprising and unexpected ways, including a new class of mirror that works like no othe...
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3DXNano™ ESD Carbon Nanotube 3D Printing Filament - optimized for demanding 3D printing applications in the semi-con and electronics industry

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
Designers in the semi-conductor fabrication market are often left searching for reliable open-source ESD-safe 3D printing materials to use in prototypes and limited production components - masks, jigs...
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European Commission opens the gate towards the implementation of Nanomedicine Translation Hub

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
A major step in implementing the ETPN Translation Hub has been reached, with three European projects entering the finalisation stage of their EU Grant Agreements. The project ENATRANS is for networkin...
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New Nanocomposites Help Elimination of Toxic Dyes

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Tabriz University in association with researchers from Ataturk University in Turkey produced a composite nanocatalyst in a research project.
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IRLYNX and CEA-Leti to Streamline New CMOS-based Infrared Sensing Modules Dedicated to Human-activities Characterization

Nanotech-Now - October 18, 2014 - 7:45am
IRLYNX and CEA-Leti today announced they have launched a technology-development partnership for a new CMOS-based infrared technology that will allow a new type of smart and connected detectors in buil...
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Plasma engineers BN surface

Nanotechweb - October 17, 2014 - 3:08am
Researchers in Japan have developed a new and easy way to chemically functionalize boron nitride.
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Nanocoatings Market By Product Is Expected To Reach USD 8.17 Billion By 2020: Grand View Research, Inc.

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
GrandViewResearch.com has announced the addition of "Nanocoatings Market By Product Is Expected To Reach USD 8.17 Billion By 2020: Grand View Research, Inc." Market Research Report to their Database.
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New VDMA Association "Electronics, Micro and Nano Technologies" founded: Inaugural Meeting in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
In the course of the restructuring of the VDMA associations "Micro Technology" and "Productronics" members have agreed to the fusion of both associations to the new association "Electronics, Micro and...
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Study reveals optimal particle size for anticancer nanomedicines

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Understanding the interdependency of physiochem...
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Nanodevices for clinical diagnostic with potential for the international market: The development is based on optical principles and provides precision and allows saving vital time for the patient

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
In order to obtain accurate and immediate diagnosis, a group of researchers in the area of Nano-Optics at the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Baja California (CICESE),...
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Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors: Nanoparticles developed at UMass Medical School advance potential clinical application for photodynamic therapy

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effec...
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ORNL research reveals unique capabilities of 3-D printing

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated an additive manufacturing method to control the structure and properties of metal components with precision un...
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Scientists Map Key Moment in Assembly of DNA-Splitting Molecular Machine: Crucial steps and surprising structures revealed in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
The proteins that drive DNA replication-the force behind cellular growth and reproduction-are some of the most complex machines on Earth. The multistep replication process involves hundreds of atomic-...
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Iranian Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Produce Dielectric Microwave Ceramics

Nanotech-Now - October 16, 2014 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Tarbiat Modarres University produced dielectric microwave ceramics with perfect dielectric properties through a simple and cheap method, which can be used in environment with...
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Graphene aerogels go crystalline

Nanotechweb - October 16, 2014 - 2:59am
New graphene oxide-based foams are of a much better quality than any made before.
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Multilayer graphene is a clear candidate for displays

Nanotechweb - October 15, 2014 - 9:11am
High levels of electrochromic modulation seen in multilayer graphene suggest a flexible solution for smart windows and displays.
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Nanoenhanced 'smart' lithium-ion battery warns of potential fire hazard

National Nanomanufacturing Network - October 15, 2014 - 3:47am
Stanford University scientists have developed a "smart" lithium-ion battery that gives ample warning before it overheats and bursts into flames. The new technology is designed for conventional lithium-ion batteries now used in billions of cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices, as well as a growing number of cars and airplanes. "Our goal is to create an early-warning system that saves lives and property," said Yi Cui (http://web.stanford.edu/group/cui_group/), an associate professor of materials science and engineering. "The system can detect problems that occur during the normal operation of a battery, but it does not apply to batteries damaged in a collision or other accident." Cui and his colleagues describe the new technology in a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the journal Nature Communications (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/NCOMMS6193). Lowering the odds A series of well-publicized incidents in recent years has raised concern over the safety of lithium-ion batteries. In 2013, the Boeing aircraft company temporarily grounded its new 787 Dreamliner (http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/2013/boeing_787/boeing_787.html) fleet after battery packs in two airplanes caught fire. The cause of the fires has yet to be determined. In 2006, Sony Corp. recalled millions of lithium-ion batteries after reports of more than a dozen consumer-laptop fires. The company said that during the manufacturing process, tiny metal impurities had gotten inside the batteries, causing them to short-circuit. "The likelihood of a bad thing like that happening is maybe one in a million," Cui said. "That's still a big problem, considering that hundreds of millions of computers and cellphones are sold each year. We want to lower the odds of a battery fire to one in a billion or even to zero." A typical lithium-ion battery consists of two tightly packed electrodes – a carbon anode and a lithium metal-oxide cathode – with an ultrathin polymer separator in between. The separator keeps the electrodes apart. If it's damaged, the battery could short-circuit and ignite the flammable electrolyte solution that shuttles lithium ions back and forth. "The separator is made of the same material used in plastic bottles," said graduate student Denys Zhuo, co-lead author of the study. "It's porous so that lithium ions can flow between the electrodes as the battery charges and discharges." Manufacturing defects, such as particles of metal and dust, can pierce the separator and trigger shorting, as Sony discovered in 2006. Shorting can also occur if the battery is charged too fast or when the temperature is too low – a phenomenon known as overcharge. "Overcharging causes lithium ions to get stuck on the anode and pile up, forming chains of lithium metal called dendrites," Cui explained. "The dendrites can penetrate the porous separator and eventually make contact with the cathode, causing the battery to short." Smart separator "In the last couple of years we've been thinking about building a smart separator that can detect shorting before the dendrites reach the cathode," said Cui, a member of the photon science faculty at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/) at Stanford. To address the problem, Cui and his colleagues applied a nanolayer of copper onto one side of a polymer separator, creating a novel third electrode halfway between the anode and the cathode. "The copper layer acts like a sensor that allows you to measure the voltage difference between the anode and the separator," Zhuo said. "When the dendrites grow long enough to reach the copper coating, the voltage drops to zero. That lets you know that the dendrites have grown halfway across the battery. It's a warning that the battery should be removed before the dendrites reach the cathode and cause a short circuit." The buildup of dendrites is most likely to occur during charging, not during the discharge phase when the battery is being used. "You might get a message on your phone telling you that the voltage has dropped to zero, so the battery needs to be replaced," Zhuo said. "That would give you plenty of lead time. But when you see smoke or a fire, you have to shut down immediately. You might not have time to escape. If you wanted to err on the side of being safer, you could put the copper layer closer to the anode. That would let you know even sooner when a battery is likely to fail." Locating defects In addition to observing a drop in voltage, co-lead author Hui Wu was able to pinpoint where the dendrites had punctured the copper conductor simply by measuring the electrical resistance between the separator and the cathode. He confirmed the location of the tiny puncture holes by actually watching the dendrites grow under a microscope. "The copper coating on the polymer separator is only 50 nanometers thick, about 500 times thinner than the separator itself," said Wu, a postdoctoral fellow in the Cui group. "The coated separator is quite flexible and porous, like a conventional polymer separator, so it has negligible effect on the flow of lithium ions between the cathode and the anode. Adding this thin conducting layer doesn't change the battery's performance, but it can make a huge difference as far as safety." Most lithium-ion batteries are used in small electronic devices. "But as the electric vehicle market expands and we start to replace on-board electronics on airplanes, this will become a much larger problem," Zhuo said. "The bigger the battery pack, the more important this becomes," Cui added. "Some electric cars today are equipped with thousands of lithium-ion battery cells. If one battery explodes, the whole pack can potentially explode." The early-warning technology can also be used in zinc, aluminum and other metal batteries. "It will work in any battery that would require you to detect a short before it explodes," Cui said. Stanford graduate student Desheng Kong also co-authored the study. Support was provided by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Source: Stanford University (http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/october/smart-battery-cui-101314.html)

New Compact SIMS to Launch at Vacuum Expo 2014

Nanotech-Now - October 14, 2014 - 7:45am
Hiden is pleased to announce the launch of the Compact SIMS, a design breakthrough for surface analysis, at Vacuum Expo 2014, 15th & 16th October Ricoh Arena, Coventry UK. Visit us on Booth V10. The C...
Categories: Nanotechnology News