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Global Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) Market Expected To Reach USD 3.42 Billion By 2022

Nanotech-Now - May 31, 2015 - 7:45am
Grand View Research.com has announced the addition of "Global Carbon Nanotubes Market Analysis And Segment Forecasts To 2022" Market Research report to their Database.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

SouthWest NanoTechnologies Introduces AgeNT™ Transparent Conductor System at SID Display Week, Booth #543

Nanotech-Now - May 31, 2015 - 7:45am
SouthWest NanoTechnologies (SWeNT), a leading manufacturer of carbon nanotube materials, is pleased to introduce AgeNT, an innovative, low-cost system for producing patterned transparent conductors fo...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nano-capsules designed for diagnosing malignant tumours: Japanese researchers have developed adaptable nano-capsules that can help in the diagnosis of glioblastoma cells - a highly invasive form of brain tumours

Nanotech-Now - May 31, 2015 - 7:45am
Polymersomes are hollow, synthetic, nano-sized capsules. They have been extensively studied for their potential in the targeted delivery of drugs within the body. PICsomes[1] are a novel class of poly...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

MEMS Manufacturing 2015

InterNano - Upcoming Events - May 29, 2015 - 10:25am
August 5, 2015 - Conference Topics Global trends: market drivers, emerging applications, intellectual property factors, government policy effects, roadmap review and development.Business aspects: competitive and market dynamics, pure play foundries vs. platform-based design approaches, technology transfer, IDM vs. fabless approaches, supply chain challenges, ecosystem development, cost management and reduction, market research and intelligence, product and service positioning.Technology aspects: process selection and development, PDKs and design rules, design for manufacturing, scaling, yield improvement, IP blocks, rapid prototyping, high volume production. Emerging technologies and processes: TSVs, 3D stacking, wafer level packaging, CMOS MEMS integration, EDA software and simulation tools, polymer and glass microfabrication, novel materials and coatings, lamination techniques, ultra-thin and flexible substrates.Front-end production: equipment, tools, methodologies, case studies.Testing and reliability: equipment, tools, methodologies, case studies.Packaging: equipment, tools, methodologies, case studies.

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance

National Nanomanufacturing Network - May 29, 2015 - 8:02am
Stanford University scientists have created a new carbon material that significantly boosts the performance of energy-storage technologies. Their results are featured on the cover of the journal ACS Central Science (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acscentsci.5b00149)."We have developed a 'designer carbon' that is both versatile and controllable," said Zhenan Bao (https://baogroup.stanford.edu/), the senior author of the study and a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford. "Our study shows that this material has exceptional energy-storage capacity, enabling unprecedented performance in lithium-sulfur batteries and supercapacitors."According to Bao, the new designer carbon represents a dramatic improvement over conventional activated carbon, an inexpensive material widely used in products ranging from water filters and air deodorizers to energy-storage devices."A lot of cheap activated carbon is made from coconut shells," Bao said. "To activate the carbon, manufacturers burn the coconut at high temperatures and then chemically treat it."The activation process creates nanosized holes, or pores, that increase the surface area of the carbon, allowing it to catalyze more chemical reactions and store more electrical charges.But activated carbon has serious drawbacks, Bao said. For example, there is little interconnectivity between the pores, which limits their ability to transport electricity."With activated carbon, there's no way to control pore connectivity," Bao said. "Also, lots of impurities from the coconut shells and other raw starting materials get carried into the carbon. As a refrigerator deodorant, conventional activated carbon is fine, but it doesn't provide high enough performance for electronic devices and energy-storage applications."3-D networksInstead of using coconut shells, Bao and her colleagues developed a new way to synthesize high-quality carbon using inexpensive – and uncontaminated – chemicals and polymers.The process begins with conducting hydrogel, a water-based polymer with a spongy texture similar to soft contact lenses."Hydrogel polymers form an interconnected, three-dimensional framework that's ideal for conducting electricity," Bao said. "This framework also contains organic molecules and functional atoms, such as nitrogen, which allow us to tune the electronic properties of the carbon."For the study, the Stanford team used a mild carbonization and activation process to convert the polymer organic frameworks into nanometer-thick sheets of carbon."The carbon sheets form a 3-D network that has good pore connectivity and high electronic conductivity," said graduate student John To, a co-lead author of the study. "We also added potassium hydroxide to chemically activate the carbon sheets and increase their surface area."The result: designer carbon that can be fine-tuned for a variety of applications."We call it designer carbon because we can control its chemical composition, pore size and surface area simply by changing the type of polymers and organic linkers we use, or by adjusting the amount of heat we apply during the fabrication process," To said.For example, raising the processing temperature from 750 degrees Fahrenheit (400 degrees Celsius) to 1,650 F (900 C) resulted in a 10-fold increase in pore volume.Subsequent processing produced carbon material with a record-high surface area of 4,073 square meters per gram – the equivalent of three American football fields packed into an ounce of carbon. The maximum surface area achieved with conventional activated carbon is about 3,000 square meters per gram."High surface area is essential for many applications, including electrocatalysis, storing energy and capturing carbon dioxide emissions from factories and power plants," Bao said.SupercapacitorsTo see how the new material performed in real-world conditions, the Stanford team fabricated carbon-coated electrodes and installed them in lithium-sulfur batteries and supercapacitors."Supercapacitors are energy-storage devices widely used in transportation and electronics because of their ultra-fast charging and discharging capability," said postdoctoral scholar Zheng Chen, a co-lead author. "For supercapacitors, the ideal carbon material has a high surface area for storing electrical charges, high conductivity for transporting electrons and a suitable pore architecture that allows for the rapid movement of ions from the electrolyte solution to the carbon surface."In the experiment, a current was applied to supercapacitors equipped with designer-carbon electrodes.The results were dramatic. Electrical conductivity improved threefold compared to supercapacitor electrodes made of conventional activated carbon."We also found that our designer carbon improved the rate of power delivery and the stability of the electrodes," Bao added.BatteriesTests were also conducted on lithium-sulfur batteries, a promising technology with a serious flaw: When lithium and sulfur react, they produce molecules of lithium polysulfide, which can leak from the electrode into the electrolyte and cause the battery to fail.The Stanford team discovered that electrodes made with designer carbon can trap those pesky polysulfides and improve the battery's performance."We can easily design electrodes with very small pores that allow lithium ions to diffuse through the carbon but prevent the polysulfides from leaching out," Bao said. "Our designer carbon is simple to make, relatively cheap and meets all of the critical requirements for high-performance electrodes."Other Stanford co-authors of the study are graduate student Jiajun He; postdoctoral scholars Hongbin Yao, Kwanpyo Kim and Ho-Hsiu Chou; visiting scholar Lijia Pan, and professors Jennifer Wilcox and Yi Cui.The study was partially funded by the Global Climate and Energy Project and the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford. Additional support was provided by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis at Stanford.Media ContactZhenan Bao, Chemical Engineering: (650) 723-2419, zbao@stanford.eduMark Shwartz, Precourt Institute for Energy: (650) 723-9296, mshwartz@stanford.eduDan Stober, Stanford News Service: (650) 721-6965, dstober@stanford.eduSource: Stanford News Service (https://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/may/designer-carbon-bao-052915.html)

Physicists precisely measure interaction between atoms and carbon surfaces

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
Physicists at the University of Washington have conducted the most precise and controlled measurements yet of the interaction between the atoms and molecules that comprise air and the type of carbon s...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Linking superconductivity and structure

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity--maintain a flow of electrons--without any resistance. It can only be found in certain materials, and even th...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

How spacetime is built by quantum entanglement: New insight into unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Chemists discover key reaction mechanism behind the highly touted sodium-oxygen battery

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
Chemists at the University of Waterloo have discovered the key reaction that takes place in sodium-air batteries that could pave the way for development of the so-called holy grail of electrochemical...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New technique speeds nanoMRI imaging: Multiplexing technique for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging developed by researchers in Switzerland cuts normal scan time from two weeks to two days

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
NanoMRI is a scanning technique that produces nondestructive, high-resolution 3-D images of nanoscale objects, and it promises to become a powerful tool for researchers and companies exploring the sha...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Squeezed quantum cats

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
Quantum physics is full of fascinating phenomena. Take, for instance, the cat from the famous thought experiment by the physicist Erwin Schrodinger. The cat can be dead and alive at once, since its li...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier: Researchers at the University of Toronto design diagnostic chip to reduce testing time from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
We live in fear of 'superbugs': infectious bacteria that don't respond to treatment by antibiotics, and can turn a routine hospital stay into a nightmare. A 2015 Health Canada report estimates that su...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Collaboration could lead to biodegradable computer chips

Nanotech-Now - May 29, 2015 - 7:45am
Portable electronics - typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable and potentially toxic materials - are discarded at an alarming rate in consumers' pursuit of the next best electronic gadget.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanopillars probe cell nuclei

Nanotechweb - May 29, 2015 - 5:55am
New technique measures nuclear mechanics quickly and non-invasively.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020

National Nanomanufacturing Network - May 28, 2015 - 10:37am
According to a new market report published by Persistence Market Research “Global Market Study on Nano-Enabled Packaging For Food and Beverages: Intelligent Packaging to Witness Highest Growth by 2020”, the global nano enabled packaging market for food and beverages industry was worth USD 6.5 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.7% during 2014 to 2020, to reach an estimated value of USD 15.0 billion in 2020.The global progress in technologies is making lives simpler and safer. Nanotechnology is one such field which is dynamically progressing and is contributing to the development of several industries, including food and beverages packaging. Nano-enabled packaging gives longer shelf life to food and beverages as compared to traditional plastic packaging. Food and beverages packaging is done through two different technologies under nano-enabled packaging-active and intelligent packaging. Active packaging has a comparativelylarger market than intelligent packaging.Intelligent packaging is growing at a faster rate as compared to the active packaging. Customers prefer traceable food and beverages packaging, since it offers information such as expiry date and best use period, present state of the consumables. The radio frequency identification (RFID) tags keep customers informed about the state of the food within the packaging. Intelligent packaging is mostly used for fruits and vegetables, meat products, and beverages. Stricter regulations associated with active packaging have been stimulating the use of intelligent packaging in Europe and North America.Intelligent packaging in the U.S. is growing mainly due to the increasing demand for fresh fruits and vegetables. Americans are shifting their breakfast preference from junk foods to fresh alternatives. The U.S. is one of the largest producers and exporters of cherries globally. With the ease in trade regulations, fruit exports of the U.S. have increased. In September 2011, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that after ten years of negotiations, U.S. cherries can be exported to Western Australia, one of the most important markets for cherries. The increasing demand for intelligent packaging in international trade (especially in fruits) is laying out opportunities for this technology in food packaging.The Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) proposed by FDA in 2011 is another growth indicator for intelligent packaging wherein the fresh produce, including fruits and vegetables, are required to be scientifically grown, harvested, packaged, and stored. The farm products that come in the act’s domain are lettuce, spinach, cantaloupe, tomatoes, sprouts, mushrooms, onions, peppers, cabbage, citrus produce, strawberries, and walnuts.Nano-enabled packaging finds its application in several industries, including bakery, meat, beverages, fruit and vegetables, prepared foods, and others. The increasing demand for meat products, beverages, vegetables, and prepared foods is expected to drive their respective nano-enabled packaging markets, while the market share of bakery products is expected to decline on account of the rapid growth of other application segments.Nanotechnology is at a nascent stage and, therefore, usage of nano-enabled packaging is low in the food and beverages industry. Limited numbers of buyers have more leverage to negotiate with nanotechnology companies. On the other hand, there is a plethora of companies providing nano-enabled packaging solutions to the food and beverages industry.Nano-enabled packaging market for food and beverage is very competitive with a large number of players offering an array of patented products. The major players in this industry include Amcor Limited, Bemis Company, Inc., Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, L.L.C., Klöckner Pentaplast, Sealed Air, and Tetra Pak International S.A.Browse the full Global Market Study on Nano-Enabled Packaging For Food and Beverages: Intelligent Packaging to Witness Highest Growth by 2020 report at www.persistencemarketresearch.com/market-research/nano-enabled-packaging-market.aspBelow is the segmentation done by Persistence Market Research for global market study on nano-enabled packaging for food and beverages:Market Size and Forecast by TechnologyMarket Size and Forecast (by value)Active PackagingIntelligent PackagingMarket Size and Forecast by ApplicationMarket Size and Forecast (by value)Bakery ProductsMeat ProductsBeveragesFruit and VegetablesPrepared FoodsOthersFor more information, please click here (http://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/market-research/nano-enabled-packaging-market.asp) Contacts:Glen HarePhone: +1-646-568-7751sales@persistencemarketresearch.comCopyright © Persistence Market Research

New Initiatives to Accelerate the Commercialization of Nanotechnology

National Nanomanufacturing Network - May 28, 2015 - 10:21am
On May 20th, the National Economic Council and the Office of Science and Technology Policy held a forum at the White House to discuss opportunities to accelerate the commercialization of nanotechnology. Over the last fifteen years, the Federal government has invested over $20 billion in nanotechnology R D as part of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) (http://www.nano.gov/), working towards breakthroughs such as smart anticancer therapeutics that will destroy tumors while leaving healthy cells untouched, and lighter, thinner body armor that could save the lives of America’s soldiers.A recent review (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/PCAST/pcast_fifth_nni_review_oct2014_final.pdf) of the NNI by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) concluded that: “…the nanotechnology field is at a critical transition point and has entered its second era, which we call NNI 2.0. This next technological generation will see the evolution from nanoscale components to interdisciplinary nano‐systems and the movement from a foundational research‐based initiative to one that also provides the necessary focus to ensure rapid commercialization of nanotechnology.” In recognition of the importance of nanotechnology R D, representatives from companies, government agencies, colleges and universities, and non-profits are announcing a series of new and expanded public and private initiatives that complement the Administration’s efforts to accelerate the commercialization of nanotechnology and expand the nanotechnology workforce: The Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Albany, NY and the Nano Health Safety Consortium (http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-05-20-15.html) to advance research and guidance for occupational safety and health in the nanoelectronics and other nanomanufacturing industry settings. Raytheon has brought together a group of representatives from the defense industry and the Department of Defense to identify collaborative opportunities to advance nanotechnology product development, manufacturing, and supply-chain support with a goal of helping the U.S. optimize development, foster innovation, and take more rapid advantage of new commercial nanotechnologies. BASF Corporation is taking a new approach to finding solutions to nanomanufacturing challenges. In March, BASF launched a prize-based “NanoChallenge” designed to drive new levels of collaborative innovation in nanotechnology while connecting with potential partners to co-create solutions that address industry challenges. OCSiAl is expanding the eligibility of its “iNanoComm” matching grant program that provides low-cost, single-walled carbon nanotubes to include more exploratory research proposals, especially proposals for projects that could result in the creation of startups and technology transfers. The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) is partnering with Venture for America and working with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote entrepreneurship in nanotechnology. Three companies (PEN, NanoMech, and SouthWest NanoTechnologies), are offering to support NSF’s Innovation Corps (I-Corps) (http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/i-corps/) program with mentorship for entrepreneurs-in-training and, along with three other companies (NanoViricides, mPhase Technologies, and Eikos), will partner with Venture for America to hire recent graduates into nanotechnology jobs, thereby strengthening new nanotech businesses while providing needed experience for future entrepreneurs. TechConnect is establishing a Nano and Emerging Technologies Student Leaders Conference to bring together the leaders of nanotechnology student groups from across the country. The conference will highlight undergraduate research and connect students with venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, and industry leaders. Five universities have already committed to participating, led by the University of Virginia Nano and Emerging Technologies Club. Brewer Science, through its Global Intern Program, is providing more than 30 students from high schools, colleges, and graduate schools across the country with hands-on experience in a wide range of functions within the company. Brewer Science plans to increase the number of its science and engineering interns by 50% next year and has committed to sharing best practices with other nanotechnology businesses interested in how internship programs can contribute to a small company’s success. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://www.nist.gov/)’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (http://www.nist.gov/cnst) is expanding its partnership with the Advanced Technology Education (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5464) program. The partnership will now run year-round and will include opportunities for students at Hudson Valley Community College and the University of the District of Columbia Community College. Federal agencies participating in the NNI, supported by the nano.gov (http://nano.gov/) of nanoscale science and engineering resources for teachers and professors. As the President observed in his most recent State of the Union (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/01/20/remarks-president-state-union-address-january-20-2015), “Twenty-first century businesses will rely on American science and technology, research and development.” We call on all sectors of the nanotechnology community to identify additional ways to work together and make sure more of those businesses are built on nanoscience and nanotechnology. Learn More: Report to the President and Congress on The Fifth Assessment of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/PCAST/pcast_fifth_nni_review_oct2014_final.pdf) (October 2014) National Nanotechnology Initiative (http://nano.gov/) White House Forum on Small Business Challenges to Commercializing Nanotechnology (http://www.nano.gov/may2015forum) Lloyd Whitman is Assistant Director for Nanotechnology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Tom Kalil is Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. JJ Raynor is Special Assistant to the President for Economic Policy at the National Economic Council.Source: The White House - Office of Science and Technology Policy (https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/05/20/new-initiatives-accelerate-commercialization-nanotechnology)

From Lab to Fab: Pioneers in Nano-Manufacturing

National Nanomanufacturing Network - May 28, 2015 - 9:44am
How can we mass-produce sophisticated products from materials too small to see? "From Lab to Fab" follows the story of two nanotech entrepreneurs navigating the rocky road from discovery to commercialization, with products ranging from tiny implantable body sensors to bullet-proof vests and aircraft flooring. Produced by the Museum of Science, Boston, in collaboration with the Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing, headquartered at Northeastern University, with funding from the National Science Foundation (EEC-0832785, CMMI-1344567). Executive Producer: Carol Lynn Alpert. For Lawrence Klein Productions LLC, Director: Lawrence Klein; Editor: Sam Green; Cinematography: Gary Henoch; Animation: James Sullivan. Inquiries: nano@mos.org. ©2015 Museum of Science. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.Source: http://mos.org/labtofab/ (http://mos.org/labtofab/)

Ferrocene makes good semi-liquid battery

Nanotechweb - May 28, 2015 - 4:43am
New energy storage device bridges the gap between batteries and capacitors.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020

Nanotech-Now - May 27, 2015 - 7:45am
Global nano enabled packaging market is growing due to increasing demand for shelf stable packaging. Nano materials have been exploited world over to be utilized in a wide range of market sectors. Foo...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Dr.Theivasanthi Slashes the Price of Graphene Heavily: World first & lowest price – Nano-price (30 USD / kg) of graphene by nanotechnologist

Nanotech-Now - May 27, 2015 - 7:45am
World record holder in nanotechnology Dr.T.Theivasanthi, a research Faculty from International Research Centre of Kalasalingam University is ready to supply graphene at “Nano-price” i.e. 30 USD per kg...
Categories: Nanotechnology News