Feed aggregator

Electric field enhances solar cell

Nanotechweb - August 8, 2014 - 5:32am
Low-cost phosphide-graphene device lacks a junction and does not need to be doped either
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Microscopy Today 2014 Innovation Award for Leica Microsystems' Super-Resolution System Leica SR GSD 3D: 3D-enabled GSDIM/dSTORM-based Microscope System Wins Again

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
Leica Microsystems' super-resolution system Leica SR GSD 3D is honored with the Microscopy Today 2014 Innovation Award for the capability of acquiring three-dimensional super-resolution images. Micros...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Cameca launches next generation atom probe microscope: New LEAP® 5000 Delivers Unmatched 3D Sub-Nanometer Analytical Performance across a Wide Variety of Metals, Semiconductors and Insulators

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
CAMECA, a world leader in scientific instrumentation and metrology solutions, is pleased to announce the release of its latest generation atom probe microscope. The LEAP 5000 offers unparalleled 3-dim...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

SouthWest NanoTechnologies Names Ovation Polymers as a SWeNT Certified Compounder

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
SouthWest NanoTechnologies (SWeNT) a leading manufacturer of single-wall, few-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes for printed electronics, energy storage and composites applications has added Ovation...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

California Nanotechnologies Appoints Dr. Enrique Lavernia to the Board

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
California Nanotechnologies Corp. (TSX VENTURE: CNO) ("Cal Nano" or the "Company") is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Enrique Lavernia, Distinguished Professor and Dean of the College of En...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University Present a Workshop on AFM Nanomechanical and Nanoelectrical Characterization, Aug. 21-22

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research and Harvard University's Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) announce an AFM Workshop and Tutorials Aug. 21-22. The workshop will focus on new techniques and instrume...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Cell mechanics may hold key to how cancer spreads and recurs

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed, according to new findings from researchers at the University of Illinois.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

“Active” surfaces control what’s on them: Researchers develop treated surfaces that can actively control how fluids or particles move

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
Researchers at MIT and in Saudi Arabia have developed a new way of making surfaces that can actively control how fluids or particles move across them. The work might enable new kinds of biomedical or...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Advanced thin-film technique could deliver long-lasting medication: Nanoscale, biodegradable drug-delivery method could provide a year or more of steady doses

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
About one in four older adults suffers from chronic pain. Many of those people take medication, usually as pills. But this is not an ideal way of treating pain: Patients must take medicine frequently,...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Light-induced nanocarriers switch on improved gene therapy

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
Nanocarriers are a useful means of transporting molecules such as genes to specific points in the body, for example to target tumors in cancer therapy. Such nanocarriers must be carefully controlled t...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Cylinder scanning system used in the ZylScan-System of the Breitmeier Messtechnik Company

Nanotech-Now - August 7, 2014 - 7:45am
The visualization of the surface structure of cylinders in the range of microns is very work-intensive with insufficient results. The interesting characteristics of the surface are scratches, cavities...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Opening a new near-infrared window for imaging the brain

Nanotechweb - August 7, 2014 - 3:56am
First non-invasive technique could monitor vascular blood flow and structure in real time and potentially help stroke patients and those with Alzheimer’s and brain tumours
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Biodegradable, Nanoscale Thin Films Release Drugs in Steady Doses Over a Long Period of Time

National Nanomanufacturing Network - August 6, 2014 - 7:48am
About one in four older adults suffers from chronic pain. Many of those people take medication, usually as pills. But this is not an ideal way of treating pain: Patients must take medicine frequently, and can suffer side effects, since the contents of pills spread through the bloodstream to the whole body. Now researchers at MIT have refined a technique that could enable pain medication and other drugs to be released directly to specific parts of the body — and in steady doses over a period of up to 14 months. The method uses biodegradable, nanoscale “thin films” laden with drug molecules that are absorbed into the body in an incremental process. “It’s been hard to develop something that releases [medication] for more than a couple of months,” says Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering at MIT, and a co-author of a new paper on the advance. “Now we’re looking at a way of creating an extremely thin film or coating that’s very dense with a drug, and yet releases at a constant rate for very long time periods.” In the paper, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe the method used in the new drug-delivery system, which significantly exceeds the release duration achieved by most commercial controlled-release biodegradable films. “You can potentially implant it and release the drug for more than a year without having to go in and do anything about it,” says Bryan Hsu PhD ’14, who helped develop the project as a doctoral student in Hammond’s lab. “You don’t have to go recover it. Normally to get long-term drug release, you need a reservoir or device, something that can hold back the drug. And it’s typically nondegradable. It will release slowly, but it will either sit there and you have this foreign object retained in the body, or you have to go recover it.” Layer by layer The paper was co-authored by Hsu, Myoung-Hwan Park of Shamyook University in South Korea, Samantha Hagerman ’14, and Hammond, whose lab is in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. The research project tackles a difficult problem in localized drug delivery: Any biodegradable mechanism intended to release a drug over a long time period must be sturdy enough to limit hydrolysis, a process by which the body’s water breaks down the bonds in a drug molecule. If too much hydrolysis occurs too quickly, the drug will not remain intact for long periods in the body. Yet the drug-release mechanism needs to be designed such that a drug molecule does, in fact, decompose in steady increments. To address this, the researchers developed what they call a “layer-by-layer” technique, in which drug molecules are effectively attached to layers of thin-film coating. In this specific case, the researchers used diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is often prescribed for osteoarthritis and other pain or inflammatory conditions. They then bound it to thin layers of poly-L-glutamatic acid, which consists of an amino acid the body reabsorbs, and two other organic compounds. The film can be applied onto degradable nanoparticles for injection into local sites or used to coat permanent devices, such as orthopedic implants. In tests, the research team found that the diclofenac was steadily released over 14 months. Because the effectiveness of pain medication is subjective, they evaluated the efficacy of the method by seeing how well the diclofenac blocked the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme central to inflammation in the body. “We found that it remains active after being released,” Hsu says, meaning that the new method does not damage the efficacy of the drug. Or, as the paper notes, the layer-by-layer method produced “substantial COX inhibition at a similar level” to pills. The method also allows the researchers to adjust the quantity of the drug being delivered, essentially by adding more layers of the ultrathin coating. A viable strategy for many drugs Hammond and Hsu note that the technique could be used for other kinds of medication; an illness such as tuberculosis, for instance, requires at least six months of drug therapy. “It’s not only viable for diclofenac,” Hsu says. “This strategy can be applied to a number of drugs.” Indeed, other researchers who have looked at the paper say the potential medical versatility of the thin-film technique is of considerable interest. "I find it really intriguing because it's broadly applicable to a lot of systems," says Kathryn Uhrich, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Rutgers University, adding that the research is "really a nice piece of work." To be sure, in each case, researchers will have to figure out how best to bind the drug molecule in question to a biodegradable thin-film coating. The next steps for the researchers include studies to optimize these properties in different bodily environments and more tests, perhaps with medications for both chronic pain and inflammation. A major motivation for the work, Hammond notes, is “the whole idea that we might be able to design something using these kinds of approaches that could create an [easier] lifestyle” for people with chronic pain and inflammation. Hsu and Hammond were involved in all aspects of the project and wrote the paper, while Hagerman and Park helped perform the research, and Park helped analyze the data. The research described in the paper was supported by funding from the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force.Source: MIT News (http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/advanced-thin-film-technique-could-deliver-long-lasting-medication-0804)

Thermal emitters speed up

Nanotechweb - August 6, 2014 - 4:40am
New infrared device is 10 000 faster than previous ones
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Silicon nanorods bend light in new directions

Nanotechweb - August 5, 2014 - 11:36am
Ultrathin coatings could replace bulky optical components
Categories: Nanotechnology News

FEI Reports New Advances in Neuroscience in Collaboration with NIH: Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers determine the structural mechanism of glutamate receptors – an important insight to the brain’s memory formation and learning

Nanotech-Now - August 5, 2014 - 7:45am
FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI's Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (T...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Harris & Harris Group Portfolio Company Enumeral Biomedical Completes Equity Offering and Public Listing: Enumeral Transitions to a Public Company and Raises $21.55 Million in New Equity Capital New Stock Symbol OTCQB:ENUM

Nanotech-Now - August 5, 2014 - 7:45am
Harris & Harris Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:TINY), an investor in transformative companies enabled by disruptive science, today announced that its portfolio company, Enumeral Biomedical Corp., completed a rev...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Acceptance of applications to compete for the RUSNANOPRIZE extended to 15 August 2014

Nanotech-Now - August 5, 2014 - 7:45am
The nomination period for the RUSNANOPRIZE Nanotechnology International Prize has been extended. Prize applications are now being accepted until 15 August 2014, inclusively.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Scientists Determine Fluctuations Caused by Temperature on Graphene Surface

Nanotech-Now - August 5, 2014 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Shahid Rajayee Teacher Training University in association with foreign researchers succeeded in the measurement of thermal fluctuations created on the surface of graphene.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Scientists Measure Medical Species Simultaneously Using Statistical Methods

Nanotech-Now - August 5, 2014 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Kashan University designed a nanosensor with low detection limit for the simultaneous measurement of medical species.
Categories: Nanotechnology News