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Spintronics: Molecules stabilizing magnetism: Organic molecules fixing the magnetic orientation of a cobalt surface/ building block for a compact and low-cost storage technology/ publication in Nature Materials

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
Organic molecules allow producing printable electronics and solar cells with extraordinary properties. In spintronics, too, molecules open up the unexpected possibility of controlling the magnetism of...

Penn researchers discover new chiral property of silicon, with photonic applications

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
By encoding information in photons via their spin, "photonic" computers could be orders of magnitude faster and efficient than their current-day counterparts. Likewise, encoding information in the spi...

Stretching the limits on conducting wires

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
In the race to produce highly stretchable conductors, researchers have developed a new technique that aligns sheets of layered carbon nanotubes along stretched rubber cores, creating an extremely flex...

Ultra-thin hollow nanocages could reduce platinum use in fuel cell electrodes

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
A new fabrication technique that produces platinum hollow nanocages with ultra-thin walls could dramatically reduce the amount of the costly metal needed to provide catalytic activity in such applicat...

UT Dallas nanotechnology research leads to super-elastic conducting fibers

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
An international research team based at The University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to over 14 times their initial length and whose elect...

Global Nano Barium Sulfate Industry 2015 Market Research Report

Nanotech-Now - July 26, 2015 - 7:45am
2015 Global Nano Barium Sulfate Industry Report is a professional and in-depth research report on the world’s major regional market conditions of the Nano Barium Sulfate industry, focusing on the main...

CHN’s Work Cited in Electronic Products Magazine

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Electronic Products magazine has cited the Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing in its July 2015 cover story on printed and flexible electronics. Northeastern’s Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) has developed a simple and highly sensitive multi-biosensor containing semiconductor single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that are enzyme-immobilized for detecting D-glucose, L-lactate, and urea in sweat (fig. 1). CHN’s director, Prof. Ahmed Busnaina, notes that, “The utilization of semiconducting carbon nanotubes for electric detection results in high repeatability and sensitivity. By leveraging the advantage of the carbon nanotubes’ electrical response and enzyme reaction, fast, specific, and continuous detection is achieved. Printing of nanomaterials to create the sensor results in low manufacturing cost”. Download the article from the CHN website: P/F Sensors: Their Future and Challenges (PDF)
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A cool way to form 2-D conducting polymers using ice

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Scientists develop breakthrough technique to easily optimize electrical properties of Polyaniline nanosheets to an unprecedented level in an environmental-friendly and inexpensive way.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Crowd-Sourced Computing Reveals How to Make Better Water Filters with Nanotubes

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Crowd-sourced computing has helped an international research team – including researchers from the University of Sydney - discover a new method of improving water filtration systems and water...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology transforms cotton fibers into modern marvel

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
In a nanoscale world researchers can control cellulose-based materials one atom at a time.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Miniature Technology, Large-Scale Impact: Winner of the 2015 Lindros Award for translational medicine, Kjeld Janssen is pushing the boundaries of the emerging lab-on-a-chip technology - See more at: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2015/015744/miniature-technolog

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
The postage stamp-sized square of fused silica Kjeld Janssen is holding may not look like a whole lot to the untrained eye, but inside the clear chip lies the potential to improve how medicine and med...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
New material could make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, research suggests.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Tiny wires could provide a big energy boost

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Wearable electronic devices for health and fitness monitoring are a rapidly growing area of consumer electronics; one of their biggest limitations is the capacity of their tiny batteries to deliver enough power to transmit data. Now, researchers at MIT and in Canada have found a promising new approach to delivering the short but intense bursts of power needed by such small devices. The key is a new approach to making supercapacitors — devices that can store and release electrical power in such bursts, which are needed for brief transmissions of data from wearable devices such as heart-rate monitors, computers, or smartphones, the researchers say. They may also be useful for other applications where high power is needed in small volumes, such as autonomous microrobots. The new approach uses yarns, made from nanowires of the element niobium, as the electrodes in tiny supercapacitors (which are essentially pairs of electrically conducting fibers with an insulator between). The concept is described in a paper in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces by MIT professor of mechanical engineering Ian W. Hunter, doctoral student Seyed M. Mirvakili, and three others at the University of British Columbia. Nanotechnology researchers have been working to increase the performance of supercapacitors for the past decade. Among nanomaterials, carbon-based nanoparticles — such as carbon nanotubes and graphene — have shown promising results, but they suffer from relatively low electrical conductivity, Mirvakili says. In this new work, he and his colleagues have shown that desirable characteristics for such devices, such as high power density, are not unique to carbon-based nanoparticles, and that niobium nanowire yarn is a promising an alternative. “Imagine you’ve got some kind of wearable health-monitoring system,” Hunter says, “and it needs to broadcast data, for example using Wi-Fi, over a long distance.” At the moment, the coin-sized batteries used in many small electronic devices have very limited ability to deliver a lot of power at once, which is what such data transmissions need. “Long-distance Wi-Fi requires a fair amount of power,” says Hunter, the George N. Hatsopoulos Professor in Thermodynamics in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, “but it may not be needed for very long.” Small batteries are generally poorly suited for such power needs, he adds. “We know it’s a problem experienced by a number of companies in the health-monitoring or exercise-monitoring space. So an alternative is to go to a combination of a battery and a capacitor,” Hunter says: the battery for long-term, low-power functions, and the capacitor for short bursts of high power. Such a combination should be able to either increase the range of the device, or — perhaps more important in the marketplace — to significantly reduce size requirements. The new nanowire-based supercapacitor exceeds the performance of existing batteries, while occupying a very small volume. “If you’ve got an Apple Watch and I shave 30 percent off the mass, you may not even notice,” Hunter says. “But if you reduce the volume by 30 percent, that would be a big deal,” he says: Consumers are very sensitive to the size of wearable devices. The innovation is especially significant for small devices, Hunter says, because other energy-storage technologies — such as fuel cells, batteries, and flywheels — tend to be less efficient, or simply too complex to be practical when reduced to very small sizes. “We are in a sweet spot,” he says, with a technology that can deliver big bursts of power from a very small device. Ideally, Hunter says, it would be desirable to have a high volumetric power density (the amount of power stored in a given volume) and high volumetric energy density (the amount of energy in a given volume). “Nobody’s figured out how to do that,” he says. However, with the new device, “We have fairly high volumetric power density, medium energy density, and a low cost,” a combination that could be well suited for many applications. Niobium is a fairly abundant and widely used material, Mirvakili says, so the whole system should be inexpensive and easy to produce. “The fabrication cost is cheap,” he says. Other groups have made similar supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes or other materials, but the niobium yarns are stronger and 100 times more conductive. Overall, niobium-based supercapacitors can store up to five times as much power in a given volume as carbon nanotube versions. Niobium also has a very high melting point — nearly 2,500 degrees Celsius — so devices made from these nanowires could potentially be suitable for use in high-temperature applications. In addition, the material is highly flexible and could be woven into fabrics, enabling wearable forms; individual niobium nanowires are just 140 nanometers in diameter — 140 billionths of a meter across, or about one-thousandth the width of a human hair. So far, the material has been produced only in lab-scale devices. The next step, already under way, is to figure out how to design a practical, easily manufactured version, the researchers say. “The work is very significant in the development of smart fabrics and future wearable technologies,” says Geoff Spinks, a professor of engineering at the University of Wollongong, in Australia, who was not associated with this research. This paper, he adds, “convincingly demonstrates the impressive performance of niobium-based fiber supercapacitors.” The team also included PhD student Mehr Negar Mirvakili and professors Peter Englezos and John Madden, all from the University of British Columbia.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology center gets $9.8M Air Force grant to develop bioprogrammable nanomaterials

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
The goal is to develop solutions to challenging problems in the areas of energy, the environment, security and defense, as well as for developing ways to monitor and mitigate human stress.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Perovskite photovoltaics: Signs of stability - Nature.com

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Nature.comPerovskite photovoltaics: Signs of stabilityNature.comThe results of Li et al. are thus an important step underlining the commercialization potential of organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells. The results on stability are encouraging. They, of course, do not solve other issues that will require ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

European collaboration accelerates silicon photonics prototyping services

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Imec and its partners announced today that they have successfully completed a three-year program to leverage a variety of silicon photonics technologies by making them accessible for industry and academia worldwide.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Major physics prize for graphene researcher

InterNano Industry News - July 25, 2015 - 3:45am
Dr Rahul Raveendran-Nair is the recipient of the 2015 Moseley medal and prize from the Institute of Physics for his outstanding contributions to our understanding of the electrical, optical and structural properties of graphene and its sister compounds.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Blood Sweat and Tears – An NBMC Workshop

InterNano - Upcoming Events - July 24, 2015 - 12:48pm
Workshop/TrainingAugust 18, 2015 to August 19, 2015 https://www.cvent.com/events/blood-sweat-and-tears/event-summary-33a9ed6be75c41ae82f4b562eaf5bab1.aspx Mark your calendar for a workshop to explore how nano-bio electronics is changing the collection and analysis of important biological fluids. In clinical settings, the health status of an individual is often determined from careful monitoring of physiological vital signs (such as heart rate, temperature, etc.) and through testing of bodily fluids and biochemical markers (such as glucose, blood gases, electrolytes, proteins, etc.). Periodic methods of collection and analysis of markers pose challenges when a  continuous stream of information is more useful, especially when monitoring conditions where clotting, infection and irritation risks are important. In this workshop, we will explore the research and development underway to enable continuous monitoring through the collection and analysis of alternative sources such as interstitial fluid, sweat, saliva and tears. We will explore new products which promise non-invasive or minimally invasive paths to biochemical markers. Since the concentration of biomarkers in these body fluids may be significantly different than clinically standardized blood and urine sources, new methods of analysis will also need development, affording opportunities for those exploring these markets. The Blood, Sweat and Tears Workshop focuses on all the body fluid modalities for assessing biomarkers in both the health and human performance domains. What are the advantages and challenges for each fluid modality in correlating the analytical information with the human condition? What is the feasibility for cost-effective continuous monitoring, and how can continuous monitoring be best utilized? Invited Speakers (partial list): • Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (confirmed) • Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (confirmed) • Bangor University (Ireland) (confirmed) • North Carolina State University (confirmed) • University of New South Wales (Australia) (confirmed) Contact:diana.ngo@flextech.org  

NanoBCA Congratulates Winners of Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards

National Nanomanufacturing Network - July 24, 2015 - 10:27am
Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCAThe NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like to congratulate the winners of the 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is recognizing landmark green chemistry technologies developed by industrial pioneers and leading scientists that turn climate risk and other environmental problems into business opportunities, spurring innovation and economic development. “From academia to business, we congratulate those who bring innovative solutions that will help solve some of the most critical environmental problems,” said Jim Jones, EPA’s Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “These innovations reduce the use of energy, hazardous chemicals and water, while cutting manufacturing costs and sparking investments. In some cases they turn pollution into useful products. Ultimately, these manufacturing processes and products are safer for people’s health and the environment. We will continue to work with the 2015 winners as their technologies are adopted in the marketplace.” The Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award winners were honored at a ceremony in Washington, DC. The winners and their innovative technologies are: Algenol in Fort Myers, Florida, is being recognized for developing a blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels. The algae uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters with sunlight and saltwater to create fuel while dramatically reducing the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, with no reliance on food crops as feedstocks. This is a win-win for the company, the public, and the environment. It has the potential to revolutionize this industry and reduce the carbon footprint of fuel production. Hybrid Coating Technologies/Nanotech Industries of Daly City, California, is being recognized for developing a safer, plant-based polyurethane for use on floors, furniture and in foam insulation. The technology eliminates the use of isocyanates, the number one cause of workplace asthma. This is already in production, is reducing VOC’s and costs, and is safer for people and the environment. LanzaTech in Skokie, Illinois, is being recognized for the development of a process that uses waste gas to produce fuels and chemicals, reducing companies’ carbon footprint. LanzaTech has partnered with Global Fortune 500 Companies and others to use this technology, including facilities that can each produce 100,000 gallons per year of ethanol, and a number of chemical ingredients for the manufacture of plastics. This technology is already a proven winner and has enormous potential for American industry. SOLTEX (Synthetic Oils and Lubricants of Texas) in Houston, Texas, is being recognized for developing a new chemical reaction process that eliminates the use of water and reduces hazardous chemicals in the production of additives for lubricants and gasoline. If widely used, this technology has the potential to eliminate millions of gallons of wastewater per year and reduce the use of a hazardous chemical by 50 percent. Renmatix in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, is being recognized for developing a process using supercritical water to more cost effectively break down plant material into sugars used as building blocks for renewable chemicals and fuels. This innovative low-cost process could result in a sizeable increase in the production of plant-based chemicals and fuels, and reduce the dependence on petroleum fuels. Professor Eugene Chen of Colorado State University is being recognized for developing a process that uses plant-based materials in the production of renewable chemicals and liquid fuels. This new technology is waste-free and metal-free. It offers significant potential for the production of renewable chemicals, fuels, and bioplastics that can be used in a wide range of safer industrial and consumer products. During the 20 years of the program, EPA has received more than 1500 nominations and presented awards to 104 technologies. Winning technologies are responsible for annually reducing the use or generation of more than 826 million pounds of hazardous chemicals, saving 21 billion gallons of water, and eliminating 7.8 billion pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent releases to air. An independent panel of technical experts convened by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute formally judged the 2015 submissions from among scores of nominated technologies and made recommendations to EPA for the 2015 winners. The 2015 awards event was held in conjunction with the 2015 Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. Please help us spread the word about the 2015 winners and their innovative technologies within your own communication channels and through social media and web. Feel free to share this message with your contacts and repost the social media content. Share the Twitter post. 2015 Presidential Green Chemistry Award winners blog. For more information on this year’s winners and those from the last two decades, visit http://www2.epa.gov/green-chemistry Once again, the NanoBCA is proud to congratulate our colleagues in the nanotechnology community.