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New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half

Nanotech-Now - March 2, 2017 - 7:45am
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic...

Atom-scale oxidation mechanism of nanoparticles helps develop anti-corrosion materials

Nanotech-Now - March 2, 2017 - 7:45am
The research group led by Prof. BAO Xinhe from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered that oxide nanostructures (NSs) with a diameter below 3 nm could exhibit an...

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes: KFU bionanotechnology lab (head - Dr. Rawil Fakhrullin) has obtained 3-D images of nematodes' cuticles

Nanotech-Now - March 2, 2017 - 7:45am
Soil nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans are very small roundworms that are studied with microscopy. They are widely used as model organisms in genetics, neurophysiology, and developmental and quantitati...

Flexible Nonvolatile Memory Just Got a Lot Closer

InterNano Industry News - March 2, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> A novel molecule changes the game in flexible nonvolatile memory, potentially ushering a new era in wearable electronics Illustration: Paolo Samori/University of Strasbourg & CNRS Irradiation with either blue or green light is used to respectively "write" or "erase" information on a flexible transistor device. The molecular switch contained in a semiconducting polymer matrix undergoes reversible interconversion between its two forms, interacting (trapping) or not with the current flowing through the semiconductor. A regular stream of breakthroughs with organic nanomaterials for use in flexible electronics has observers scratching their heads as to why we aren’t seeing more of these technologies in applications such as wearable electronics. The problem has been that although organic nanomaterials have made flexible logic circuits and displays possible, they have pretty much failed to yield flexible, nonvolatile memories with write/erase speeds that would make them practical. Now a team of researchers hailing from the University of Strasbourg and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in France, along with collaborators from Humboldt University of Berlin and the University of Nova Gorica, in Slovenia, has developed a flexible nonvolatile optical memory thin-film transistor device made from organic nanomaterials that may change the game in wearable electronics. To date, the major challenge in developing flexible organic memories has been creating a stable system that doesn’t lose data over time (volatility), is flexible, and offers an acceptable number of write/erase cycles (endurance). The international research team overcame all of those hurdles, but they wanted more. “We wanted every single device to be able to store more than just a single bit (multilevel operation); we achieved 8 bits,” said Emanuele Orgiu, a researcher at CNRS and one of the authors of the paper, in an email interview with IEEE Spectrum. “In addition, our devices can be made from solutions directly on a plastic substrate, and they feature very fast response times (within nanoseconds)—an intensely sought-after property for organic semiconductors, which usually exhibit very long response times (greater than a millisecond),” added Orgiu. In a paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology , the team explains that it was able to achieve all of this by fabricating the device from molecules known as diarylethenes (DAEs), which can be switched between two states (called either open or closed form). Switching from writing to erasing was as simple as adjusting the wavelength of the light hitting the material (blue light  for writing, green for erasing). “The DAEs used in our work are particularly suited for nonvolatile data storage, since their two forms are stable at ambient conditions,” explained Tim Leydecker, another researcher from CNRS who is a member of the research team. “Plus, they can be switched even when embedded within a semiconducting polymer matrix, making them an ideal candidate for flexible films.” explains that the molecules’ fast response to a 3-nanosecond laser pulse is relevant to modern electronics. Another benefit of the DAE molecules is that the amount of molecules that are switched in reaction to the light can be precisely controlled, which is a key requirement for multi-level storage that improves the data density. Paolo Samorì, another team member from CRNS, explained that the molecules’ fast response to a 3-nanosecond laser pulse brings them right in line with modern electronics. Samorì added that another benefit of the DAE molecules is that the number of molecules that are switched in reaction to the light can be precisely controlled—a key requirement for improved data density in multilevel storage. The devices they have fabricated so far are laboratory prototypes, and thus are relatively large at 1 square millimeter. Needless to say, miniaturization and encapsulation will need to be addressed in order for these memories to become a commercial product. However, the rearchers already have these issues in their sights, and plan to continue testing the performance and stability of the devices after encapsulation. The team will also be examining fabrication processes compatible with industrial output, such as roll-to-roll manufacturing and inkjet printing. Stefan Hecht, a team member from Humboldt University of Berlin, added: “Implementation into electronics featuring other organic components (organic light-emitting diodes and organic field-effect transistors) is an important step, as the entire system would benefit from the advantages of organic electronics.”
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Single-Crystal Graphene Films Grown More Than 100 Times as Fast as Previously Possible

InterNano Industry News - March 2, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> Ultrafast synthesis of high-quality graphene films combined with roll-to-roll processes ushers in a new era in graphene production Image: Peking University/Nature Nanotechnology The adaptation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production of graphene so that it’s compatible with roll-to-roll processing is transforming graphene manufacturing. That effort is being led by companies like Graphene Frontiers, based in Philadelphia. However, the production of single-crystal graphene on copper foils in a CVD process remains a fairly time consuming procedure. Fabrication of centimeter-size single crystals of graphene still takes as much as a day. Now researchers at Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Peking University have developed a technique that accelerates the process so that the growth happens at 60 micrometers per second—far faster than the typical 0.4 µm per second. The key to this 150-fold speed increase was adding a little oxygen directly to the copper foils. In the research, which is described in the journal Nature Nanotechnology , the China-based researchers placed an oxide substrate 15 micrometers below the copper foil. The result: a continuous supply of oxygen that lowers the energy barrier to the decomposition of the carbon feedstock, thereby increasing the graphene growth rate. The expectations were that the oxide substrate would release the oxygen at the high temperatures inside the CVD surface (over 800 degrees Celsius). The researchers confirmed this through the use of electron spectroscopy. While the measurements indicated that oxygen was indeed being released, the amount was still fairly minimal. Nevertheless, this minuscule amount of oxygen proved sufficient for their purposes because the very small space between the oxide substrate and the copper foil created a trapping effect that multiplied the effect of the oxygen. In their experiments, the researchers were able to successfully produce single-crystal graphene materials as large as 0.3 millimeter in just five seconds. That, according to the researchers, is more than two orders of magnitude faster than other methods in which graphene is grown on copper foils. The researchers believe that this ultrafast synthesis of graphene makes possible a new era of scalable production of high-quality, single-crystal graphene films by combining this process with roll-to-roll methods. Counterintuitively, speeding up the process of producing single-crystal graphene films may not automatically lead to wider adoption of graphene in various devices. Just a few years ago, graphene production was stuck at around a 25-percent utilization rate, and there is no reason to believe that demand has increased enough to have dramatically changed those figures. (Graphene producers will tell you that if demand for CVD-produced graphene suddenly spiked, volume could be doubled nearly overnight.) Nonetheless, speed in manufacturing is always an attractive option for any product. It just might not offer a change to the graphene landscape as much as a few “killer apps” might.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Graphene-Enabled Paper Makes for Flexible Display

InterNano Industry News - March 2, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> By applying a voltage to graphene sandwiching a piece of paper, researchers have created a new display technology Images: Bilkent University Graphene has been building quite a reputation for itself in flexible displays. Among the ways graphene has been used in this field is as an alternative to the relatively scarce indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductor that controls display pixels. Graphene has also been used in a display’s pixel electronics, or backplane, where a solution-processed graphene is used as an electrode. Now researchers at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey, have demonstrated that an ordinary sheet of paper that is sandwiched between two films of multilayer graphene can act as a rudimentary flexible electronic display. In an interview with Nature Photonics , the corresponding author, Coskun Kocabas, says that this system could serve as a framework for turning ordinary printing paper into an optoelectronic display. Kocabas explained: We would like to fabricate a display device that can reconfigure the displayed information electronically on a sheet of printing paper. Several technologies based on electrophoretic motion of particles, thermochromic dyes and electrowetting of liquids have been developed to realize electronic paper, or e-paper, which has great potential for consumer electronics. Contrasting with the primary aim of e-paper, these technologies, however, are not compatible with conventional cellulose-based printing papers. The researchers described their device in the journal ACS Photonics. It operates by applying a bias voltage to the graphene to trigger an intercalation of ions so that the optical absorption of the graphene layers is altered. That turns them from transparent to dark and back again. (Intercalation is the reversible inclusion of a molecule or ions between two other molecules in multilayered structures or compounds.) In the experiments, the display’s transition to transparent takes a bit of time— about 4 seconds; reverting to its darker form takes under half a second. While this may be suitable for signs that don’t need to change their images that often, the lapse is still too long for display applications that require quick refresh times. The multilayer graphene was produced through chemical vapor deposition in which the graphene is grown on a metal surface inside a furnace. After it’s removed from the furnace, the metal is etched away, leaving a thin film of graphene on the surface of the water in which the etching occurs. Then the paper is simply submersed into the liquid, which transfers the thin film of graphene onto the paper. While the initial experiments showed that there were some issues with oxidation of the doped graphene layers, the researchers believe that this hiccup can be overcome with the addition of a simple polymer coating. In future research, Kocabas and his colleagues are planning to make a fully functional sheet of e-paper with pixels and an integrated driving circuit. They would like to see the process they have developed adapted into a roll-to-roll-compatible manufacturing process.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

At UChicago's Nanofabrication Facility, Innovation Happens on a Molecular Scale - Chicago Inno

InterNano Industry News - March 2, 2017 - 4:45am
At UChicago's Nanofabrication Facility, Innovation Happens on a Molecular ScaleChicago InnoThis February UChicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME) opened the 10,000 square foot Pritzker Nanofabrication Facility, which features fabrication tools that allow researchers and industry to create and experiment with materials that make ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Biosensors: Distance makes the signal grow stronger

Nanotech-Now - March 1, 2017 - 9:09am
A new MRI-based ‘nanoruler’ allows the in vivo sensing of a range of biological targets, including pH changes and the presence of cancer biomarkers. As Jinwoo Cheon and co-workers report in Nature Mat...

Proteins and nanoparticles self-assemble ordered nanostructures

Nanotechweb - March 1, 2017 - 8:22am
Superstructures could be used in therapeutics.

CNST: Micro-LEGO Towards 3D Assembly and Nanomaterial Integration

InterNano - Upcoming Events - February 28, 2017 - 10:04am
LectureMonday, March 27, 2017 - 10:30amGaithersburg, MD https://www.nist.gov/news-events/events/2017/03/micro-lego-towards-3d-assembly-and-nanomaterial-integration Seok Kim, Mechanical Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Reversible dry adhesion-based transfer printing provides a highly straightforward pathway to heterogeneous material integration. The speaker presents his recent research outcomes in terms of 3D heterogeneous integration accomplished in his laboratory which has been exploring responsive materials, microassembly, and nanomanufacturing technologies. The first part introduces biomimetic engineered reversible dry adhesives made of shape memory polymers. The second part shows how his reversible dry adhesives enable LEGO-like microassemly and nanomaterial integration through transfer printing techniques. Finally, the third part demonstrates the applications of his approaches with the examples not only of devices such as a microtoroid resonator, a tip-tilt-piston micromirror, and a RF MEMS switch, but also of processes such as colloidal quantum dot film patterning and integration. The strategies presented in his talk benefit research activities in smart dry adhesives, 3D MEMS, and nano devices. Biography: Seok Kim received his B.S. from Pohang University of Science and Technology, M.S. from University of California at Los Angeles, and Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University, all in mechanical engineering, and joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. His current research interests include biomimetic engineered surfaces for reversible dry adhesion and tunable wetting, transfer printing-based microassembly and nanomanufacturing, and 3D MEMS fabrication technologies. He was a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2014, the ASME Chao and Trigger Young Manufacturing Engineer Award in 2015, and the Young Investigator Grant Award from the Korean–American Scientists and Engineers Association in 2015. For further information please contact Robert Ilic, 301-975-2639, Robert.Ilic@nist.gov

CNST: Micro-LEGO Towards 3D Assembly and Nanomaterial Integration

National Nanomanufacturing Network - February 28, 2017 - 10:04am
LectureMonday, March 27, 2017 - 10:30amGaithersburg, MD https://www.nist.gov/news-events/events/2017/03/micro-lego-towards-3d-assembly-and-nanomaterial-integration Seok Kim, Mechanical Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Reversible dry adhesion-based transfer printing provides a highly straightforward pathway to heterogeneous material integration. The speaker presents his recent research outcomes in terms of 3D heterogeneous integration accomplished in his laboratory which has been exploring responsive materials, microassembly, and nanomanufacturing technologies. The first part introduces biomimetic engineered reversible dry adhesives made of shape memory polymers. The second part shows how his reversible dry adhesives enable LEGO-like microassemly and nanomaterial integration through transfer printing techniques. Finally, the third part demonstrates the applications of his approaches with the examples not only of devices such as a microtoroid resonator, a tip-tilt-piston micromirror, and a RF MEMS switch, but also of processes such as colloidal quantum dot film patterning and integration. The strategies presented in his talk benefit research activities in smart dry adhesives, 3D MEMS, and nano devices. Biography: Seok Kim received his B.S. from Pohang University of Science and Technology, M.S. from University of California at Los Angeles, and Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University, all in mechanical engineering, and joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. His current research interests include biomimetic engineered surfaces for reversible dry adhesion and tunable wetting, transfer printing-based microassembly and nanomanufacturing, and 3D MEMS fabrication technologies. He was a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2014, the ASME Chao and Trigger Young Manufacturing Engineer Award in 2015, and the Young Investigator Grant Award from the Korean–American Scientists and Engineers Association in 2015. For further information please contact Robert Ilic, 301-975-2639, Robert.Ilic@nist.gov

Particle Works creates range of high performance quantum dots

Nanotech-Now - February 28, 2017 - 7:45am
Particle Works – the nano- and microparticle materials specialist – has developed a range of high quality quantum dots for use in diagnostic, biomedical and optoelectronic applications. Available with...

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announces Availability of 45nm RF SOI to Advance 5G Mobile Communications: Optimized RF features deliver high-performance solutions for mmWave beam forming applications in 5G smartphones and base stations

Nanotech-Now - February 28, 2017 - 7:45am
GLOBALFOUNDRIES today announced the availability of its 45nm RF SOI (45RFSOI) technology offering, making GF the first foundry to announce an advanced, 300mm RF silicon solution to support next genera...

EmTech Asia breaks new barriers with potential applications of space exploration with NASA and MIT

Nanotech-Now - February 28, 2017 - 7:45am
The fourth edition of EmTech Asia, co-organised by MIT Technology Review and Koelnmesse Pte Ltd, concluded on a high note after two days of stimulating and insightful discussions on the latest breakth...

JPK selects compact tensile stage from Deben for their NanoWizard® AFM platform to broaden capabilities for materials characterisation

Nanotech-Now - February 28, 2017 - 7:45am
Deben, a leading provider of in-situ testing stages together with innovative accessories and components for electron microscopy, have supplied leading German instrument manufacturers, JPK Instruments,...

Flash Nano: Electrolytic cleaning tackles CVD graphene residues

Nanotechweb - February 27, 2017 - 12:23pm
Effective PMMA residue removal promotes chemical vapour deposition as a potentially scalable approach for generating high-quality graphene.

Doped-graphene nanoribbons outclass copper as interconnects

Nanotechweb - February 27, 2017 - 3:22am
Multilayer graphene nanoribbons are better in terms of performance, reliability and energy efficiency down to 20 nm width – with room for improvement.

Molecular phenomenon discovered by advanced NMR facility: Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says researc

Nanotech-Now - February 26, 2017 - 7:45am
•Cutting edge tech shows molecule self-assembling into different forms passing from solution state to solid state and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says University of Warwick research...

Tiny nanoclusters could solve big problems for lithium-ion batteries

Nanotech-Now - February 26, 2017 - 7:45am
As devices become smaller and more powerful, they require faster, smaller, more stable batteries. University of Illinois chemists have developed a superionic solid that could be the basis of next-gene...

Scalable 100% Yield Production of Conductive Graphene Inks

National Nanomanufacturing Network - February 24, 2017 - 10:04am
Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics such as radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas, transistors or photovoltaic cells. Sophia Lloyd, Graphene Flagship Conductive inks based on graphene and layered materials are key for low-cost manufacturing of flexible electronics, novel energy solutions, composites and coatings. A new method for liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite paves the way for scalable production.