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Engineering black gold, as light as the bones of birds

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
A team of Korean research team, led by Professor Ju-Young Kim (School of Materials Science and Engineering) of Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), South Korea has recently anno...

New nanoparticle reveals cancer treatment effectiveness in real time: 'Reporter nanoparticle' delivers therapeutic payload and glows green when cancer cells die

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
Being able to detect early on whether a cancer therapy is working for a patient can influence the course of treatment and improve outcomes and quality of life. However, conventional detection methods...

CWRU researchers make biosensor 1 million times more sensitive: Advance aims at detecting cancers earlier, improving treatment and outcomes

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
Physicists and engineers at Case Western Reserve University have developed an optical sensor, based on nanostructured metamaterials, that's 1 million times more sensitive than the current best availab...

Quantum effects at work in the world's smelliest superconductor

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
The quantum behaviour of hydrogen affects the structural properties of hydrogen-rich compounds, which are possible candidates for the elusive room temperature superconductor, according to new research...

Multilingual circuit: NIST's 'optomechanical transducer' links sound, light, radio waves

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
Researchers working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a "piezo-optomechanical circuit" that converts signals among optical, acoustic and radio waves. A system...

Nanometrics Achieves Record 3D-NAND Bookings Quarter: A Record 3D-NAND Bookings Quarter, both in Aggregate and for Each of Three Key Customers

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
Nanometrics Incorporated (NASDAQ:NANO), a leading provider of advanced process control systems, today announced record 3D-NAND bookings totaling over $38 million for the first quarter of 2016. The re...

Microneedle patch delivers localized cancer immunotherapy to melanoma

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
Biomedical engineering researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to del...

Saving sunshine for a rainy day: New catalyst offers efficient storage of green energy: Team led by U of T Engineering designs world's most efficient catalyst for storing energy as hydrogen by splitting water molecules

Nanotech-Now - March 30, 2016 - 7:45am
We can't control when the wind blows and when the sun shines, so finding efficient ways to store energy from alternative sources remains an urgent research problem. Now, a group of researchers led by...

Negative NV charge states could make good fluorescent probes

Nanotechweb - March 30, 2016 - 4:04am
Nitrogen vacancy centre in nanodiamond could be used to monitor variations in electrochemical potential.

Nanotechnology announces the first winner of the Young Researcher Award

InterNano Industry News - March 30, 2016 - 3:45am
We speak to Jae Hyun Lee, winner of the first Nanotechnology Young Researcher Award about the challenges and motivations in his nanobioscience work.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

SUNY Poly and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announce New $500M R&D Program in Albany To Accelerate Next Generation Chip Technology: Arrival of Second Cutting Edge EUV Lithography Tool Launches New Patterning Center That Will Generate Over 100 New High Tech Jobs at SUNY

InterNano Industry News - March 30, 2016 - 3:45am
In support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s commitment to maintaining New York State’s global leadership in nanotechnology research and development, SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) and GLOBALFOUND...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics

InterNano Industry News - March 30, 2016 - 3:45am
An engineering research team at the University of Alberta has invented a new transistor that could revolutionize thin-film electronic devices.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New chip fabrication approach

InterNano Industry News - March 30, 2016 - 3:45am
Today, computer chips are built by stacking layers of different materials and etching patterns into them. But in the latest issue of Advanced Materials, MIT researchers and their colleagues report the first chip-fabrication technique that enables significantly different materials to be deposited in the same layer. They also report that, using the technique, they have built chips with working versions of all the circuit components necessary to produce a general-purpose computer. The layers of material in the researchers’ experimental chip are extremely thin — between one and three atoms thick. Consequently, this work could abet efforts to manufacture thin, flexible, transparent computing devices, which could be laminated onto other materials. “The methodology is universal for many kinds of structures,” says Xi Ling, a postdoc in the Research Laboratory of Electronics and one of the paper’s first authors. “This offers us tremendous potential with numerous candidate materials for ultrathin circuit design.” The technique also has implications for the development of the ultralow-power, high-speed computing devices known as tunneling transistors and, potentially, for the integration of optical components into computer chips. “It’s a brand new structure, so we should expect some new physics there,” says Yuxuan Lin, a graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science and the paper’s other first author. Ling and Lin are joined on the paper by Mildred Dresselhaus, an Institute Professor emerita of physics and electrical engineering; Jing Kong, an ITT Career Development Professor of Electrical Engineering; Tomás Palacios, an associate professor of electrical engineering; and by another 10 MIT researchers and two more from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Taiwan’s National Tsing-Hua University. Strange bedfellows Computer chips are built from crystalline solids, materials whose atoms are arranged in a regular geometrical pattern known as a crystal lattice. Previously, only materials with closely matched lattices have been deposited laterally in the same layer of a chip. The researchers’ experimental chip, however, uses two materials with very different lattice sizes: molybdenum disulfide and graphene, which is a single-atom-thick layer of carbon. Moreover, the researchers’ fabrication technique generalizes to any material that, like molybdenum disulfide, combines elements from group six of the periodic table, such as chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, and elements from group 16, such as sulfur, selenium, and tellurium. Many of these compounds are semiconductors — the type of material that underlies transistor design — and exhibit useful behavior in extremely thin layers. Graphene, which the researchers chose as their second material, has many remarkable properties. It’s the strongest known material, but it also has the highest known electron mobility, a measure of how rapidly electrons move through it. As such, it’s an excellent candidate for use in thin-film electronics or, indeed, in any nanoscale electronic devices. To assemble their laterally integrated circuits, the researchers first deposit a layer of graphene on a silicon substrate. Then they etch it away in the regions where they wish to deposit the molybdenum disulfide. Next, at one end of the substrate, they place a solid bar of a material known as PTAS. They heat the PTAS and flow a gas across it and across the substrate. The gas carries PTAS molecules with it, and they stick to the exposed silicon but not to the graphene. Wherever the PTAS molecules stick, they catalyze a reaction with another gas that causes a layer of molybdenum disulfide to form. In previous work, the researchers characterized a range of materials that promote the formation of crystals of other compounds, any of which could be plugged into the process. Future electronics The new fabrication method could open the door to more powerful computing if it can be used to produce tunneling-transistor processors. Fundamentally, a transistor is a device that can be modulated to either allow a charge to cross a barrier or prohibit it from crossing. In a tunneling transistor, the charge crosses the barrier by means of a counterintuitive quantum-mechanical effect, in which an electron can be thought of as disappearing at one location and reappearing at another. These effects are subtle, so they’re more pronounced at extremely small scales, like the one- to three-atom thicknesses of the layers in the researchers’ experimental chip. And, because electron tunneling is immune to the thermal phenomena that limit the efficiency of conventional transistors, tunneling transistors can operate at very low power and could achieve much higher speeds. "This work is very exciting,” says Philip Kim, a physics professor at Harvard University. “The MIT team demonstrated that controlled stitching of two completely different, atomically thin 2-D materials is possible. The electrical properties of the resulting lateral heterostructures are very impressive."
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Unlocking the gates to quantum computing: The quantum Fredkin gate has been experimentally realized for the first time

Nanotech-Now - March 28, 2016 - 7:45am
Researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland have overcome one of the key challenges to quantum computing by simplifying a complex quantum logic operation. They demonstrated t...

Entanglement becomes easier to measure: New protocol to detect entanglement of many-particle quantum states

Nanotech-Now - March 28, 2016 - 7:45am
In quantum theory, interactions among particles create fascinating correlations known as entanglement that cannot be explained by any means known to the classical world. Entanglement is a consequence...

New open source software for high resolution microscopy: Bielefeld physicists report their new development in Nature Communications

Nanotech-Now - March 28, 2016 - 7:45am
With their special microscopes, experimental physicists can already observe single molecules. However, unlike conventional light microscopes, the raw image data from some ultra-high resolution instrum...

Newly discovered organic nanowires leave manmade technologies in their dust

Nanotech-Now - March 28, 2016 - 7:45am
A microbial protein fiber discovered by a Michigan State University scientist transports charges at rates high enough to be applied in manmade nanotechnologies.

Graphene nanoribbons: It's all about the edges: When electrons spin differently

Nanotech-Now - March 28, 2016 - 7:45am
As electronic components are becoming ever smaller, the industry is gradually approaching the limits of what is achievable using the traditional approach with silicon as a semiconductor material. Grap...