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Nano-beaker offers insight into the condensation of atoms

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
An international team of physicists has succeeded in mapping the condensation of individual atoms, or rather their transition from a gaseous state to another state, using a new method. Led by the Swis...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A spoonful of sugar in silver nanoparticles to regulate their toxicity

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
The use of colloidal silver to treat illnesses has become more popular in recent years, but its ingestion, prohibited in countries like the US, can be harmful to health. Scientists from the Max Planck...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

The path to artificial photosynthesis: HZB researchers describe efficient manganese catalyst capable of converting light to chemical energy

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
Through their work, Professor Emad Aziz, head of the HZB Institute "Methods for Material Development", Professor Leone Spiccia from Monash University and their teams have taken an important leap forwa...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Smart keyboard cleans and powers itself -- and can tell who you are

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
In a novel twist in cybersecurity, scientists have developed a self-cleaning, self-powered smart keyboard that can identify computer users by the way they type. The device, reported in the journal ACS...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New method to generate arbitrary optical pulses

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a new technique to generate more powerful, more energy efficient and low-cost pulsed lasers.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases New Application Note: “AFM Applications in Polymer Science and Engineering”

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research has released a new application note, "AFM Applications in Polymer Science and Engineering," written by former NIST researcher Dr. Donna Hurley. Polymer scientists we...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Spain nanotechnology at nano tech 2015 (Tokyo, Japan)

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
The Phantoms Foundation and ICEX Spain Trade and Investment, in cooperation with the Embassy of Spain (Economic and Commercial Office) in Tokyo bring together, for the eighth time, a nanoscience and n...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Self-assembled nanotextures create antireflective surface on silicon solar cells: Nanostructured surface textures-with shapes inspired by the structure of moths' eyes-prevent the reflection of light off silicon, improving conversion of sunlight to electri

Nanotech-Now - January 22, 2015 - 7:45am
Reducing the amount of sunlight that bounces off the surface of solar cells helps maximize the conversion of the sun's rays to electricity, so manufacturers use coatings to cut down on reflections. No...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Wearable Sensor Smooths Path to Long-Term EKG, EMG Monitoring

National Nanomanufacturing Network - January 22, 2015 - 6:26am
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate as the “wet electrode” sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and is more accurate than existing sensors when a patient is moving. Long-term monitoring of electrophysiological signals can be used to track patient health or assist in medical research, and may also be used in the development of new powered prosthetics that respond to a patient’s muscular signals. Electrophysiological sensors used in hospitals, such as EKGs, use wet electrodes that rely on an electrolytic gel between the sensor and the patient’s skin to improve the sensor’s ability to pick up the body’s electrical signals. However, this technology poses problems for long-term monitoring, because the gel dries up – irritating the patient’s skin and making the sensor less accurate. The new nanowire sensor is comparable to the wet sensors in terms of signal quality, but is a “dry” electrode – it doesn’t use a gel layer, so doesn’t pose the same problems that wet sensors do. “People have developed other dry electrodes in the past few years, and some have demonstrated the potential to rival the wet electrodes, but our new electrode has better signal quality than most – if not all – of the existing dry electrodes. It is more accurate,” says Dr. Yong Zhu, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper describing the work. “In addition, our electrode is mechanically robust, because the nanowires are inlaid in the polymer.” The sensors stem from Zhu’s earlier work to create highly conductive and elastic conductors (https://news.ncsu.edu/2012/07/wms-zhu-silver-stretch/) made from silver nanowires, and consist of one layer of nanowires in a stretchable polymer. The new sensor is also more accurate than existing technologies at monitoring electrophysiological signals when a patient is in motion. “The silver nanowire sensors conform to a patient’s skin, creating close contact,” Zhu says. “And, because the nanowires are so flexible, the sensor maintains that close contact even when the patient moves. The nanowires are also highly conductive, which is key to the high signal quality.” The new sensors are also compatible with standard EKG- and EMG-reading devices. “I think these sensors are essentially ready for use,” Zhu says “The raw materials of the sensor are comparable in cost to existing wet sensors, but we are still exploring ways of improving the manufacturing process to reduce the overall cost.” An uncorrected proof of the paper, “Wearable Silver Nanowire Dry Electrodes for Electrophysiological Sensing (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2015/ra/c4ra15101a#%21divAbstract),” was published online Jan. 14 in RSC Advances, immediately after acceptance. Lead author of the paper is Amanda Myers, a Ph.D. student at NC State. The paper was co-authored by Dr. Helen Huang, an associate professor in the joint biomedical engineering program at NC State and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Source: North Carolina State University

International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 2015 (ICNSNT)

InterNano - Upcoming Events - January 21, 2015 - 2:12pm
September 1, 2015 - The 2nd Annual International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology -2015 (ICNSNT-2015) will be held during 1-3 September Colombo, Sri Lanka under the theme of Taking Nanotechnology to New Heights Through Innovation and Collaboration. And also TIIKMs 2nd International Conference on Energy 2015(ICOE) will be held as a concurrent conference at the same venue. So registered participants of ICNSNT will be grant free access to participate other conference sessions Initiated in 2014, ICNSNT continued its momentum to explore the emerging advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The ICNSNT-2015 has scheduled an excellent programme consisting of an Executive Round Table, an exhibition, special sessions, discussions, a social networking dinner, a cultural show and an optional post conference tour. 2nd Annual International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology encourages the exchange of ideas between chemists, physicists, material scientists, biomedical researchers, engineers and other researchers who are active at the frontiers of this diverse and multidisciplinary field. Coverage extends from basic research in physics, chemistry and biology, including computational work and simulations, through to the development of new devices and technologies for applications in a wide range of industrial sectors (including information technology, medicine, manufacturing, high-performance materials, and energy and environmental technologies).

Opals turn atom spectra upside down

Nanotechweb - January 20, 2015 - 10:26am
The natural simplicity of atoms as perfect resonators reveals new optical behaviour in photonic crystals.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Self-destructive Effects of Magnetically-doped Ferromagnetic Topological Insulators: Magnetic atoms that create exotic surface property also sow the seeds of its destruction

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
The discovery of "topologically protected" electrical conductivity on the surface of some materials whose bulk interior acts as an insulator was among the most sensational advances in the last decade...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New laser could upgrade the images in tomorrow’s tech

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
A new semiconductor laser developed at Yale has the potential to significantly improve the imaging quality of the next generation of high-tech microscopes, laser projectors, photo lithography, hologra...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology Used to Produce Ceramic Membrane with High Thermal Stability

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers used nanotechnology to produce a new type of ceramic membrane with high thermal stability.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Iran Designs Nano Medicine-Career Easing Chemotherapy Side Effects

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers at the Amirkabir University of Technology produced a Nano medicine-career for prostate cancer, expected to reduce chemotherapy side effects.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Magnetic Nanosorbents Able to Eliminate Chemical Contaminants

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Shahid Beheshti University succeeded in the production of a nanosorbent that can separate high percentages of contaminants in natural samples.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Malaysian Nanotechnology Company Nanopac Innovation Ltd. lists on the NSX

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
Nanopac Innovation Ltd. is pleased to announce that effective July 23, 2014, the Company is listed on the National Stock Exchange of Australia (NSX), Australia's second largest listing market, as tick...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New “triggered-release” mechanism could improve drug delivery

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
More efficient medical treatments could be developed thanks to a new method for triggering the rearrangement of chemical particles.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoparticles Able to Eliminate Pathogen Bacteria Biofilm

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Kerman University of Medical Sciences studied the effect of nanoparticles on bacterial biofilms to find new methods for the treatment of bacteria infectious diseases.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoparticles for clean drinking water

Nanotech-Now - January 20, 2015 - 7:45am
One way of removing harmful nitrate from drinking water is to catalyse its conversion to nitrogen. This process suffers from the drawback that it often produces ammonia. By using palladium nanoparticl...
Categories: Nanotechnology News