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A Method of Producing DNA-Encoded Nanoparticles has been Developed

InterNano Industry News - February 19, 2016 - 4:45am
By Jake Wilkinson A novel technique that uses DNA to encode information onto the surface of gold nanoparticles has been developed. This new method can be used to control the 3D structure of...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanowalls for smartphones

InterNano Industry News - February 19, 2016 - 4:45am
Researchers at ETH Zurich have manufactured transparent electrodes for use in touchscreens using a novel nanoprinting process. The new electrodes are some of the most transparent and conductive that have ever been developed. Read More...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Inexpensive transparent conductors from correlated metal nanostructures

InterNano Industry News - February 19, 2016 - 4:45am
A figure showing the crystal structure of strontium vanadate (orange) and calcium vanadate (blue). The red dots are oxygen atoms arranged in 8 octohedra surrounding a single strontium or calcium atom. Vanadium atoms can be seen inside each octahedron. Credit image: Lei Zhang/Penn State It is usually both interesting and useful when technology identifies multiple paths to the same goal, particularly when a new path has a major advantage, such as a much lower cost and substituting an abundant resource for a limited one. A hat tip to Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence for reprinting this Penn State news release written by Walt Mills “Transparent metal films for smartphone, tablet and TV displays“: A new material that is both highly transparent and electrically conductive could make large screen displays, smart windows and even touch screens and solar cells more affordable and efficient, according to the Penn State materials scientists and engineers who discovered it. Indium tin oxide, the transparent conductor that is currently used for more than 90 percent of the display market, has been the dominant material for the past 60 years. However, in the last decade, the price of indium has increased dramatically. Displays and touchscreen modules have become a main cost driver in smartphones and tablets, making up close to 40 percent of the cost. While memory chips and processors get cheaper, displays get more expensive from generation to generation. Manufacturers have searched for a possible ITO replacement, but until now, nothing has matched ITO’s combination of optical transparency, electrical conductivity and ease of fabrication. A team led by Roman Engel-Herbert, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, reports … in Nature Materials [abstract] a new design strategy that approaches the problem from a different angle. The researchers use thin — 10 nanometer — films of an unusual class of materials called correlated metals in which the electrons flow like a liquid. While in most conventional metals, such as copper, gold, aluminum or silver, electrons flow like a gas, in correlated metals, such as strontium vanadate and calcium vanadate, they move like a liquid. According to the researchers, this electron flow produces high optical transparency along with high metal-like conductivity. “We are trying to make metals transparent by changing the effective mass of their electrons,” Engel-Herbert said. “We are doing this by choosing materials in which the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged electrons is very large compared to their kinetic energy. As a result of this strong electron correlation effect, electrons ‘feel’ each other and behave like a liquid rather than a gas of non-interacting particles. This electron liquid is still highly conductive, but when you shine light on it, it becomes less reflective, thus much more transparent.” To better understand how they achieved this fine balance between transparency and conductivity, Engel-Herbert and his team turned to a materials theory expert, Professor Karin Rabe of Rutgers University. “We realized that we needed her help to put a number on how ‘liquid’ this electron liquid in strontium vanadate is,” Engel-Herbert said. Rabe helped the Penn State team put together all the theoretical and mathematical puzzle pieces they needed to build transparent conductors in the form of a correlated metal. Now that they understand the essential mechanism behind their discovery, the Penn State researchers are confident they will find many other correlated metals that behave like strontium vanadate and calcium vanadate. Lei Zhang, lead author on the Nature Materials paper and a graduate student in Engel-Herbert’s group, was the first to recognize what they had discovered. “I came from Silicon Valley where I worked for two years as an engineer before I joined the group,” said Zhang. “I was aware that there were many companies trying hard to optimize those ITO materials and looking for other possible replacements, but they had been studied for many decades and there just wasn’t much room for improvement. When we made the electrical measurements on our correlated metals, I knew we had something that looked really good compared to standard ITO.” Currently indium costs around $750 per kilogram, whereas strontium vanadate and calcium vanadate are made from elements with orders of magnitude higher abundance in the earth’s crust. Vanadium sells for around $25 a kilogram, less than 5 percent of the cost of indium, while strontium is even cheaper than vanadium. “Our correlated metals work really well compared to ITO,” said Engel-Herbert. “Now, the question is how to implement these new materials into a large-scale manufacturing process From what we understand right now, there is no reason that strontium vanadate could not replace ITO in the same equipment currently used in industry.” Along with display technologies, Engel-Herbert and his group are excited about combining their new materials with a very promising type of solar cell that uses a class of materials called organic perovskites. Developed only within the last half dozen years, these materials outperform commercial silicon solar cells but require an inexpensive transparent conductor. Strontium vanadate, also a perovskite, has a compatible structure that makes this an interesting possibility for future inexpensive, high-efficiency solar cells. Engel-Herbert and Zhang have applied for a patent on their technology. The potential application to organic perovskite solar cells illustrates an interesting point: a technical development that “merely” makes an existing technology (displays) more affordable may make the difference between feasible and infeasible for a potentially even larger market (solar cells efficient, inexpensive, and robust enough to pave roads and roofs). —James Lewis, PhD
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Personalizing nanoparticles to better target tumours

Nanotechweb - February 19, 2016 - 3:39am
The size, shape and composition of therapeutic particles need to be tailored to the biological and physical properties of different tumours.

Trapped charge carriers delay light emission

Nanotechweb - February 18, 2016 - 5:06am
New work sheds more light on our understanding of nanoemitters in general and nanoplatelets in particular.

Save the Date: D-Wave Systems, HZO and Metabolon to Present at Harris & Harris Group's Annual Meeting, Tuesday June 7, 2016, the New York Genome Center

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
Harris & Harris Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:TINY), an investor in transformative companies enabled by disruptive science, announced today that it will be hosting a morning of presentations from three of its p...

Advance could aid development of nanoscale biosensors

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
Imagine a hand-held environmental sensor that can instantly test water for lead, E. coli, and pesticides all at the same time, or a biosensor that can perform a complete blood workup from just a singl...

Light used to measure the 'big stretch' in spider silk proteins

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
While working to improve a tool that measures the pushes and pulls sensed by proteins in living cells, biophysicists at Johns Hopkins say they've discovered one reason spiders' silk is so elastic: Pie...

The Gravity of the National Space Society's Vision!

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
We, the members of the National Space Society, believe exploring the unknown is one of the things that drives our vision of "people living and working in thriving communities beyond the Earth, and the...

A new spin on quantum computing: Scientists train electrons with microwaves: Experiment with Berkeley lab-developed material shows promise for quantum information processing

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
In what may provide a potential path to processing information in a quantum computer, researchers have switched an intrinsic property of electrons from an excited state to a relaxed state on demand us...

Engineering material magic: Utah engineers discover groundbreaking semiconducting material that could lead to much faster electronics

Nanotech-Now - February 17, 2016 - 7:45am
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power...

SABIC Announces Large Format Touch Sensor Capability with 2.5 and 3D Formability

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
With large format interactive displays becoming more ubiquitous – from large indoor and outdoor displays to electronic whiteboards – the need has increased for advanced materials that are highly sensi...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

QD Vision Named as CES 2016 Innovation Awards Honoree for its Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Optic

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
QD Vision has been named a CES 2016 Innovation Awards Honoree for its Color IQ™ quantum dot optic, which expands the color gamut for edge-lit displays such as TVs, LCD monitors and all-in-one computer...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Promising new approach for controlled fabrication of carbon nanostructures

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
An international team of researchers including Professor Federico Rosei and members of his group at INRS has developed a new strategy for fabricating atomically controlled carbon nanostructures used i...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoworld Snow Blowers Carve Straight Channels in Semiconductor Surfaces

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
In the nanoworld, tiny particles of gold can operate like snow blowers, churning through surface layers of an important class of semiconductors to dig unerringly straight paths. The surprising trenching capability, reported by scientists ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology specialist to lead Va. Tech's research division - Roanoke Times

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
Nanotechnology specialist to lead Va. Tech's research divisionRoanoke TimesMayer has taught electrical engineering and materials science and engineering at Penn State and has been recognized for her research in device nanomanufacturing, the release stated. She has served as a site director for the National Science Foundation ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoscale Patterning Via Block Copolymers

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
Thin films: Balancing surface tension between polymer blocks keeps segments aligned for photolithography
Categories: Nanotechnology News

ORNL Process Could Be White Lightning to Electronics Industry

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
(Jefferson County Post) A new era of electronics and even quantum devices could be ushered in with the fabrication of a virtually perfect single layer of "white graphene," according to researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory...12/20
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Move aside carbon: Boron nitride-reinforced materials are even stronger

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
Carbon nanotubes are legendary in their strength—at least 30 times stronger than bullet-stopping Kevlar by some estimates. When mixed with lightweight polymers such as plastics and epoxy resins, the tiny tubes reinforce the material, like the rebar in a block of concrete, promising lightweight and strong materials for airplanes, spaceships, cars and even sports equipment.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Simple shell of plant virus sparks immune response against cancer: Mice tumor free and protected from metastases after treatment

InterNano Industry News - February 17, 2016 - 4:45am
The shells of a common plant virus, inhaled into a lung tumor or injected into ovarian, colon or breast tumors, not only triggered the immune system in mice to wipe out the tumors, but provided system...
Categories: Nanotechnology News