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Current state of fabricating molecular electronics

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
Since the early days of molecular electronics, tremendous progress has been achieved both theoretically and experimentally by scientists and engineers who were fascinated by intriguing physical, chemical phenomena, and potential device applications of molecular junctions. In a recent paper, scientists review recent experimental efforts for pursuing high-yield functional molecular devices, in which a bundle of molecules (the contacted molecules number more than 1000) is contained in a junction.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

European Union launches 'Observatory for Nanomaterials' website

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
The EU observatory for nanomaterials launched with information on products, safety, regulation and much more.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

PillarHall test structures accelerate the development of microelectronics in three dimensions

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
Scientists have developed the unique PillarHall test structures to accelerate the market entry of three-dimensional, small, efficient and low-power but high-performance electronic components. This will benefit developers of challenging thin film and related manufacturing processes, and thereby the entire electronics industry value network.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Design and fabrication of 3D-printed stretchable tactile sensors

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
Researchers demonstrate the design and fabrication of stretchable tactile sensors that are 3D printed under ambient conditions via a combination of nanocomposite ink optimization, 3D imaging, and multimaterial 3D printing.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

3D-printed, fully integrated wireless sensor devices

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
Researchers have demonstrated a fully integrated and packaged wireless sensor for environmental monitoring applications. The disposable sensor was developed using low-cost additive manufacturing technologies; namely, inkjet printing and 3D printing. This is a demonstration of 3D-printed fully-integrated System-on-Package (SoP) employing inkjet-printed sensors. This work could pave the way for low-cost disposable fully integrated wireless sensor nodes.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanosheets: IBM’s Path to 5-Nanometer Transistors

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> IBM says their stacked nanosheet transistors will give circuit designers more flexibility Photo: IBM Researchers at IBM believe the future of the transistor is in stacked nanosheets. After a decade of research, most recently in partnership with Samsung and Global Foundries, the company will describe 5-nanometer node test chips based on these transistors today at the Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits in Kyoto. Today’s state-of-the-art transistor is the finFET, named for the fin-like ridges of current-carrying silicon that project from the chip’s surface. The silicon fins are surrounded on their three exposed sides by a structure called the gate. The gate switches the flow of current on, and prevents electrons from leaking out when the transistor is off. This design is expected to last from this year’s bleeding-edge process technology, the “10-nanometer” node, through the next node, 7 nanometers. But any smaller, and these transistors will become difficult to switch off: electrons will leak out, even with the three-sided gates. So the semiconductor industry has been working on alternatives for the upcoming 5 nanometer node. One popular idea is to use lateral silicon nanowires that are completely surrounded by the gate, preventing electron leaks and saving power. This design is called “gate all around.” IBM’s new design is a variation on this. In their test chips, each transistor is made up of three stacked horizontal sheets of silicon, each only a few nanometers thick and completely surrounded by a gate. Why a sheet instead of a wire? Huiming Bu, director of silicon integration and devices at IBM, says nanosheets can bring back one of the benefits of pre-finFET, planar designs. Designers used to be able to vary the width of a transistor to prioritize fast operations or energy efficiency. Varying the amount of silicon in a finFET transistor is not practicable because it would mean making some fins taller and other shorter. Fins must all be the same height due to manufacturing constraints, says Bu. IBM’s nanosheets can range from 8 to 50 nanometers in width. “Wider gives you better performance but takes more power, smaller width relaxes performance but reduces power use,” says Bu. This will allow circuit designers to pick and choose what they need, whether they are making a power efficient mobile chip processor or designing a bank of SRAM memory. “We are bringing flexibility back to the designers,” he says. The test chips have 30 billion transistors. The company has not benchmarked them against 7 nanometer designs, since those are not on the market. Compared to 10 nanometer chips, the new designs have a 40 percent performance enhancement at a given power; at matched performance, they can save 75 percent on power. Mukesh Khare, vice president of semiconductor technology and research at IBM, says that the company has spent years working on the process technology and materials for making stacked nanosheets. The research chips were made using electron-beam lithography—a technology too expensive for mass production. But by the time 5-nanometer chips go into production extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUV) will be available to reduce costs, according to Khare. He says that it takes the same number of EUV lithography masks—the patterns to be projected onto to the chip to form transistor components—to make a 5-nanometer nanosheet transistor as it does to make an equivalent finFET. IBM plans to offer this technology to their customers at the 5-nanometer node. “We think this will become the prevalent structure beyond finFET,” says Khare. 
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Making flexible electronics with nanowire networks

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
A smartphone touchscreen is an impressive piece of technology. It displays information and responds to a user's touch. But as many people know, it's easy to break key elements of the transparent, electrically conductive layers that make up even the sturdiest rigid touchscreen. If flexible smartphones, e-paper and a new generation of smart watches are to succeed, they can't use existing touchscreen technology.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Transforming greenhouse gas CO2 into carbon nanotubes

InterNano Industry News - September 17, 2017 - 3:45am
In two new studies, researchers show that cement plants can have their carbon dioxide exhaust eliminated while co-producing carbon nanotubes. They demonstrate that with their C2CNT (carbon dioxide into carbon nanotubes) process, a wide portfolio of tailored carbon nanotubes, such as those with special shapes or conductivity can be made. C2CNT is a straightforward process that transforms CO2 to carbon nanotubes by molten electrolysis with inexpensive (nickel and steel) electrodes and low voltage. This synthesis consumes only CO2 and electricity, and is constrained only by the cost of electricity.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Technology Development Pathways: Case Studies from the National Nanotechnology Initiative

InterNano - Upcoming Events - September 15, 2017 - 10:02am
Workshop/TrainingWednesday, November 1, 2017 - 12:00pmWashington, DC https://www.nano.gov/TechPathwaysWorkshop The Technology Development Pathways workshop will showcase application areas where nanotechnology has had commercial impact. Keynote presentations will highlight the pathways companies have taken to get from research to commercialization. Afternoon panel discussions will focus on specific steps of the development pathway, such as scale up and quality control/ measurement systems. Building on these successes, conversations at the workshop will explore remaining technical challenges or innovations needed to fully exploit the commercial potential of nanotechnology over the coming decades. While the primary focus will be to share best practices from the private sector, Federal Government representatives will also participate, enabling attendees to learn of ongoing research, agency needs, and funding opportunities. This event will support the goals of the Sustainable Manufacturing: Creating Industries of the Future Nanotechnology Signature Initiative.

Technology Development Pathways: Case Studies from the National Nanotechnology Initiative

National Nanomanufacturing Network - September 15, 2017 - 10:02am
Workshop/TrainingWednesday, November 1, 2017 - 12:00pmWashington, DC https://www.nano.gov/TechPathwaysWorkshop The Technology Development Pathways workshop will showcase application areas where nanotechnology has had commercial impact. Keynote presentations will highlight the pathways companies have taken to get from research to commercialization. Afternoon panel discussions will focus on specific steps of the development pathway, such as scale up and quality control/ measurement systems. Building on these successes, conversations at the workshop will explore remaining technical challenges or innovations needed to fully exploit the commercial potential of nanotechnology over the coming decades. While the primary focus will be to share best practices from the private sector, Federal Government representatives will also participate, enabling attendees to learn of ongoing research, agency needs, and funding opportunities. This event will support the goals of the Sustainable Manufacturing: Creating Industries of the Future Nanotechnology Signature Initiative.

High-speed quantum memory for photons

Nanotech-Now - September 15, 2017 - 7:45am
Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a memory that can store photons. These quantum particles travel at the speed of light and are thus suitable for high-speed data transfer. The res...

Quantum detectives in the hunt for the world's first quantum computer

Nanotech-Now - September 15, 2017 - 7:45am
A new paper in Nature Communications is the latest confirmation of Majorana fermions -- a strange quasiparticle at the heart of the next generation of quantum machines being pursued by University of S...

Interlayer-expanded nanosheets could make good battery electrode materials

Nanotechweb - September 15, 2017 - 5:18am
2D vanadyl phosphate intercalated with organic molecules improves sodium-ion devices.

Dichalcogenides offer atomically thin alternatives to silicon

Nanotechweb - September 14, 2017 - 3:28am
Hafnium and zirconium selenides form "native" high-k dielectrics, allowing atomically thin transistors with low-defect interfaces.

Fast magnetic writing of data

Nanotech-Now - September 13, 2017 - 7:45am
For almost seventy years now, magnetic tapes and hard disks have been used for data storage in computers. In spite of many new technologies that have been developed in the meantime, the controlled mag...

Chemical hot spots: Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements identify active sites on catalyst surfaces

Nanotech-Now - September 13, 2017 - 7:45am
Chemistry live: Using a scanning tunneling microscope, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able for the very first time to witness in detail the activity of catalysts during a...

Nanoparticles limit damage in spinal cord injury: Injection after an injury reduces inflammation and scarring

Nanotech-Now - September 13, 2017 - 7:45am
After a spinal cord injury, a significant amount of secondary nerve damage is caused by inflammation and internal scarring that inhibits the ability of the nervous system to repair itself.

More durable, less expensive fuel cells: University of Delaware researchers have developed a new technology that could speed up the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles

Nanotech-Now - September 13, 2017 - 7:45am
A team of engineers at the University of Delaware has developed a technology that could make fuel cells cheaper and more durable, a breakthrough that could speed up the commercialization of fuel cell...

A revolution in lithium-ion batteries is becoming more realistic

Nanotech-Now - September 13, 2017 - 7:45am
The modern world relies on portable electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops, cameras or camcorders. Many of these devices are powered by lithium-ion batteries, which could be smaller,...

Opto-thermophoretic technique assembles colloidal nanoparticles

Nanotechweb - September 13, 2017 - 4:16am
New approach overcomes the limitations of existing methods and works for a wide range of different materials.