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Molecular motors make contracting gel

Nanotechweb - January 19, 2015 - 5:33am
Light-driven device could find use in a wide range of applications, including artificial muscles, nano- and micro-robots, and advanced mechanical motors that work using nanomachines.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Going with the flow

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
Previous research has already demonstrated that substantial quantities of self-motile or active agents such as bacteria in a fluid environment can be harnessed to do mechanical work like moving micros...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Two or one splashing? It's different! Physicist at the University of Bonn observe light-matter interaction with two atoms for the first time

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
If two children splash in the sea high water waves will emerge due to constructive superposition. Different observations are made for the microscopic world in an experiment at the University of Bonn,...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Improved interface for a quantum internet

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
Quantum computers are no longer just a theoretical concept. In recent years, researchers have assembled and successfully tested the building blocks for a future quantum computer in the laboratory. Mor...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Charge instability detected across all types of copper-based superconductors: Findings may help researchers synthesize materials that can superconduct at room temperature

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
Superconductors made of copper-oxide ceramics called cuprates are capable of conducting electricity without resistance at record-high temperatures--but still only at about one-third of room temperatur...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Phenomenon that fights with superconductivity universal across both flavors of cuprates

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
Researchers have spotted charge ordering - a phenomenon that interferes with superconductivity - in electron-doped copper-oxide crystals for the first time. The discovery is a critical step towards ac...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Extra-short nanowires best for brain

Nanotech-Now - January 18, 2015 - 7:45am
If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less i...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanowire photonic chip detects single photons

Nanotechweb - January 16, 2015 - 8:29am
Device could be used to make real-world optical quantum computers in the future.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a de...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Shining a light on quantum dots measurement

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Due to their nanoscale dimensions and sensitivity to light, quantum dots are being used for a number of bioimaging applications including in vivo imaging of tumor cells, detection of biomolecules, and...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Rice's Naomi Halas to direct Smalley Institute: Optics pioneer will lead Rice's multidisciplinary science institute

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Rice University today named nanotechnology pioneer Naomi Halas director of the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. Halas, one of Rice's most cited and renowned researche...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells, Stanford study finds

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Stacking perovskites onto a conventional silicon solar cell dramatically improves the overall efficiency of the cell, according to a new study led by Stanford University scientists.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Liquids and glasses relax, too. But not like you thought

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
A new insight into the fundamental mechanics of the movement of molecules recently published* by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers a surprising view of wh...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Gold nanoparticles show promise for early detection of heart attacks: NYU School of Engineering Professors collaborate with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering professors have been collaborating with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip that is demonstrating great potential for the early detection of ce...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Iranian Scientists Measure Blood Sugar through Patient's Expiration

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from University of Tehran succeeded in the production of a sensor that finds the amount of blood sugar of diabetic patients by measuring acetone concentration in their expiration. ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Titania Nanocoating Helps Surface Modification of Artificial Bones

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from University of Tehran in association with their counterparts from University of Malaya, Malaysia, studied the modification of properties of human body implants by using titania...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology in Energy Applications Market Research Report 2014-2018: Radiant Insights, Inc

Nanotech-Now - January 16, 2015 - 7:45am
RadiantInsights.com include new market research report "Nanotechnology in Energy Applications Market Research Report 2014-2018: Radiant Insights, Inc" to its huge collection of research reports.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

NanoSphere Health Sciences Announces Patent-Pending Status for Nanoparticle Encapsulation of NSAIDs

National Nanomanufacturing Network - January 16, 2015 - 3:19am
NanoSphere Health Sciences, LLC, innovative developers of the industry-first, patent-pending NanoSphere™ delivery system, announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark office issued "Patent Pending" status for its new NSAID NanoSphere technology platform. NanoSphere Health's NSAIDs are the first to encapsulate prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Ibuprofen, Aspirin, Naproxen, etc.) as a method to treat and prevent inflammatory disorders and global inflammation and pain. The use of the NanoSphere delivery technology eliminates and alleviates many of the severe side effects NSAIDs can have, such as stomach irritation, stomach bleeding and GI bleeding, among others. At the same time, it increases the therapeutic activity of NSAIDs for safe, long-term and more effective therapy. NanoSphere NSAIDs are uniquely designed to be administered intraorally, intranasally and transdermally. The convenient liquid nanogels bypass the GI tract avoiding gastrointestinal irritation. When taken perorally, NanoSphere NSAIDs' structure of purified essential phospholipids maintains the protective GI tract mucosa barrier from damage by NSAIDs. The NanoSphere NSAIDs are then efficiently transported into the circulatory system for greater therapeutic activity in safely treating inflammatory conditions and relieving pain. "We are excited to announce that NanoSphere's NSAID technology platform has achieved a 'Patent Pending' status, protecting the intellectual property of our NanoSphere delivery system within NSAIDs," said Dr. Richard Kaufman, Chief Science Officer at NanoSphere Health Sciences. "Our disruptive NanoSphere delivery biotechnology introduces a significant advancement in the therapeutic potential and safety of OTC and prescription NSAIDs along with a tremendous growth potential." NSAIDs cause a range of gastrointestinal problems from mild upset stomach to serious conditions such as stomach bleeding, ulcers and kidney damage, factors which often limit their use. Among patients using NSAIDs, 30-40% have some degree of GI intolerance. NSAIDs physically damage the protective GI mucosa surface and promote bleeding. Furthermore, NSAIDs are fat-soluble drugs with low solubility and dissolution in water. This makes OTC and prescription NSAID pills hard to absorb and contributes to their causing GI problems. "The problems with current NSAID therapy are glaringly apparent," says Terry Grossman M.D., Medical Director at NanoSphere Health Sciences. "NSAIDs have low bioavailability and limited delivery into inflamed areas. They produce adverse effects, compounded with the fact that nearly half the population has difficulties swallowing currently sold NSAID pills and capsules." The company's patent-pending phospholipid nanoparticle encapsulation of NSAIDs technology provides the following potential benefits: Higher Concentration of NSAIDs Increased Bioavailability of NSAIDs (2-fold to 10-fold) Decreased Dosage of NSAIDS (2-fold to 10-fold) Enables Safe, Long-Term Use and More Efficacious NSAID Therapy and Treatment Reduced Risk of Gastrointestinal Problems Transport into and Targeting of Specific Body Sites Delivery into the Central Nervous System Enhanced Therapeutic Value Ideal for Long-Term and Daily Use NanoSphere Health expects availability of commercial licensing by the second quarter of 2015, after clinical trials have been completed. About NanoSphere Health Sciences, LLC With its headquarters in Denver, Colorado, NanoSphere Health Sciences is a biotechnology firm specializing in the creation of NanoSphere delivery systems for the supplement, nutraceutical, OTC and pharmaceutical industries. For more information, visit www.nanospherehealth.com (http://www.nanospherehealth.com) Source: NanoSphere Health Sciences

Engineered nanoribbon bandgaps help improve electronics

Nanotechweb - January 15, 2015 - 5:31am
Researchers create atomically perfect graphene ribbons with varying widths using a bottom-up fabrication technique.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanocomplex images differentiating stem cells

Nanotechweb - January 15, 2015 - 5:08am
New real-time imaging technique could be used to screen drugs for treating neurodegenerative diseases and brain trauma.
Categories: Nanotechnology News