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No Hogwarts invitation required: Invisibility cloaks move into the real-life classroom: A new solid-state device can demonstrate the physical principles of invisibility cloaks without special equipment or magic spells

Nanotech-Now - May 2, 2015 - 7:45am
Who among us hasn't wanted to don a shimmering piece of fabric and instantly disappear from sight? Unfortunately, we non-magical folk are bound by the laws of physics, which have a way of preventing s...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Desirable defects: A new meta-material based on colloids and liquid crystals

Nanotech-Now - May 2, 2015 - 7:45am
"Generally, flaws are the last thing you'd want in a liquid crystal", explains Giuseppe D'Adamo, postdoctoral fellow at SISSA. "However, this new method allows us to exploit the defects in the materia...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Imec Reports 9 Percent Growth in 2014

Nanotech-Now - May 2, 2015 - 7:45am
Nanoelectronics research center imec, today reported the financial results for fiscal year ended December 31, 2014. Revenue for 2014 totaled 363 million euros, a 9 percent growth from the previous yea...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

FEI Partners With the George Washington University to Equip New Science & Engineering Hall: Suite of new high-performance microscopes will be used for cutting-edge experiments at GW’s new research facility

Nanotech-Now - May 2, 2015 - 7:45am
FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) and the George Washington University (GW) are pleased to announce that they are partnering to install several new high-performance microscopes at GW’s Science and Engineering Hall....
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Rice University's Richards-Kortum, Vardi elected to National Academy of Sciences: Bioengineer, computer scientist join elite list of dual-academy members

Nanotech-Now - May 2, 2015 - 7:45am
Rice University bioengineer Rebecca Richards-Kortum and computer scientist Moshe Vardi have joined the elite group of scientists elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Acade...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

VENICE'2015 AES-ATEMA Int. Conference

InterNano - Upcoming Events - May 1, 2015 - 9:30am
September 15, 2015 - Following its preceding AES-ATEMA International Conferences and Conventions, VENICE'2015 Conference will continue to address important topics within the realm of "Advances and Trends in Engineering Materials and their Applications". Contributions, mini-symposia and expositions are invited in the following and related scientific/engineering and technological research areas: - Materials and engineering design- Metals and alloys- Composite materials and structures- Biotechnology, biomaterials, bio-tribology and devices- Ceramics- Smart and adaptive material systems, including intelligent aeronautical materials and structures- Nanomaterials and nanotechnology- Advanced analytical and computational methods- Advanced experimental testing technic. Other technological research areas of interest to the Conference: Science and Engineering; Energy and Fuels; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Oceanography; Materials Sciences; Novel Materials; Computer Sciences; Medicinal Chemistry; Information Science and Bioinformatics; Health Sciences; Chemical Sciences; Electrical, Electronic; Biological Sciences; Clinical Medicine; Physical Sciences; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences; Mathematics; ...

TORONTO'2015 AES-ATEMA 25th Int. Conference

InterNano - Upcoming Events - May 1, 2015 - 9:29am
August 10, 2015 - Following its preceding AES-ATEMA International Conferences and Conventions, TORONTO'2015 Conference will continue to address important topics within the realm of "Advances and Trends in Engineering Materials and their Applications". Contributions, mini-symposia and expositions are invited in the following and related scientific/engineering and technological research areas: - Materials and engineering design- Metals and alloys- Composite materials and structures- Biotechnology, biomaterials, bio-tribology and devices- Ceramics- Smart and adaptive material systems, including intelligent aeronautical materials and structures- Nanomaterials and nanotechnology- Advanced analytical and computational methods- Advanced experimental testing technic. Other technological research areas of interest to the Conference: Science and Engineering; Energy and Fuels; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Oceanography; Materials Sciences; Novel Materials; Computer Sciences; Medicinal Chemistry; Information Science and Bioinformatics; Health Sciences; Chemical Sciences; Electrical, Electronic; Biological Sciences; Clinical Medicine; Physical Sciences; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences; Mathematics; ...

MONTREAL'2015 AES-ATEMA 22nd Int. Conference

InterNano - Upcoming Events - May 1, 2015 - 9:27am
June 15, 2015 - Following the success of its preceding international conferences and conventions, the delegates of this year international conference will continue to address important topics within the realm of \"Advances and Trends in Engineering Materials and their Applications\".Proceedings will be indexed for inclusion in SCOPUS.Conference Topics: Contributions, mini-symposia and expositions are invited in the following and related scientific/engineering and technological research areas: - Materials and engineering design - Metals and alloys - Composite materials and structures - Biotechnology, biomaterials, bio-tribology and devices - Ceramics - Smart and adaptive material systems, including intelligent aeronautical materials and structures - Nanomaterials and nanotechnology - Advanced analytical and computational methods - Advanced experimental testing technic.Other technological research areas of interest to the Conference: Science and Engineering; Energy and Fuels; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Oceanography; Materials Sciences; Novel Materials; Computer Sciences; Medicinal Chemistry; Information Science and Bioinformatics; Health Sciences; Chemical Sciences; Electrical, Electronic; Biological Sciences; Clinical Medicine; Physical Sciences; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences; Mathematics; ...

FEI Company: Strong Growth Prospects Remain

Nanotech-Now - May 1, 2015 - 8:08am
Summary • While FEI Company reported decent quarterly results, currency fluctuations have become a growing problem for the company. • FEI Company still maintains a strong foothold is sever...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

3D graphene makes biocompatible scaffolds

Nanotechweb - May 1, 2015 - 6:04am
Carbon material might be ideal in complex tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, as well as for making implantable electronics and biosensors.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Making robots more human

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions -- from smiling and frowning to brow-furrowing and eye-rolling -- to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sen...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Artificial photosynthesis could help make fuels, plastics and medicine

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
The global industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total energy used every year. Now scientists are inventing a new artificial photosynthetic system that could one day reduce industry's d...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Research seeks alternatives for reducing bacteria in fresh produce using nanoengineering

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
Nearly half of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. from 1998 through 2008 have been attributed to contaminated fresh produce. Prevention and control of bacterial contamination on fresh produce is critical...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A phone with the ultimate macro feature: New attachment turns a smartphone into a microscope that can image and size DNA molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have recently...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Electron chirp: Cyclotron radiation from single electrons measured directly for first time: Method has potential to measure neutrino mass and look beyond the Standard Model of the universe

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
A year before Albert Einstein came up with the special theory of relativity, or E=mc2, physicists predicted the existence of something else: cyclotron radiation. Scientists predicted this radiation to...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Simultaneous Measurement of Drugs Made Possible by Nanosensors

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
Academic researchers in Iran succeeded in the production of a nanosensor by using a simple method and cheap materials to measure some types of drugs concurrently.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Quantum particles at play: Game theory elucidates the collective behavior of bosons

Nanotech-Now - April 30, 2015 - 7:45am
Quantum particles behave in strange ways and are often difficult to study experimentally. Using mathematical methods drawn from game theory, physicists of Ludwig-Maximilias-Universitaet (LMU) in Munic...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Three-Dimensional Printing/Additive Manufacturing Incorporating Nanomaterials

National Nanomanufacturing Network - April 30, 2015 - 5:39am
Additive manufacturing for the creation of complex three-dimensional (3D) structures has gained significant attention in recent years as a means to manufacture enhanced structural and functional architectures that retain the properties of the materials utilized, for example mechanical strength and thermal properties. 3D printing has emerged as a versatile approach to build such structures from ink formulations incorporating nanomaterials dispersions that have been engineered to provide the necessary properties desired within the physical structure. While 3D printing of a range of nanomaterials has been demonstrated, graphene has recently been explored for the printing of 3D structures of various dimensions having controlled properties. Example applications include printed electronics, biosensors, strain sensors, battery electrodes and separators, or filtration wherein the electrical, physical, chemical, or mechanical properties of the structures are controlled to provide targeted functionality by design. Utilizing processes such as inkjet or nanoimprint lithography, structures have been realized for printed electronics and sensors. More recently, a 3D printing strategy has been demonstrated for the fabrication of 3D graphene aerogels with designed macroscopic architectures, enabling a method to further control the mechanical and surface area properties of complex macroscale structures. This technique reported by Zhu, et. al. employs a three-axis motion stage to assemble 3D structures by robotically extruding a continuous ‘ink’ filament through a micronozzle at room temperature in a layer-by-layer scheme to create 3D periodic graphene aerogel macroarchitectures. This approach, based on the precise deposition of grapheme oxide (GO) ink filaments on a pre-defined tool path to create architected 3D structures, first addresses the challenge of tailoring the composition and rheology of the inks in order to readily flow through the nozzle while maintaining sufficient viscosity to support the shape after deposition. The authors added a fused silica powder to the ink suspension as a means to increase its’ viscosity and enhance the printability of the GO ink. The use of the silica filler in the ink provided several benefits including longer pot life, better control over viscosity, and GO density in the resulting aerogel matrix which tend to have high porosity and therefore low density of GO nanostructures within the porous structure. The authors demonstrated 3D printed aerogel microlattices printed having properties that met or exceeded those of bulk aerogel materials. These graphene microlattices, constructed in a log-pile configuration, possess large surface areas, good electrical conductivity, low relative densities and supercompressibility, and are much stiffer than bulk graphene of comparable geometric density. The authors demonstrated that the microstructure and density of the graphene aerogel can be modified by changing the ink formulation, while the mechanical properties of the microlattices can be tuned. Thus work demonstrates a manufacturing method for creating periodic or engineered structures using this novel material which will further expand the range of applications where graphene can be utilized, opening up the possibility to explore the properties and applications of graphene in a self-supporting, structurally tunable and 3D macroscopic form, and could further lead to new types of graphene-based electronics. Reference: Zhu C, Han YJT, Duoss EB, Golobic AM, Kuntz JD, Spadaccini CM, Worsley MA. Highly Compressible 3D Periodic Graphese Aerogel Microlattices. Nature Communications. 2015; 6: 6962 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7962 (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150422/ncomms7962/abs/ncomms7962.html)

Transient transistors are biocompatible

Nanotechweb - April 30, 2015 - 4:34am
Devices might be used in a wide range of new technologies, including temporary, biodegradable medical implants.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

3D-printed graphene for electronic and biomedical applications

National Nanomanufacturing Network - April 30, 2015 - 3:56am
Exploiting graphene's exceptional electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties for practical devices requires fabrication techniques that allow the direct manipulation of graphene on micro- and macroscopic scales. Finding the ideal technique to achieve the desired graphene patterning remains a major challenge. One manufacturing route that researchers have been exploring with increased intensity is inkjet printing where liquid-phase graphene dispersions are used to print conductive thin films. Inkjet printing, however, doesn't help much when trying to build three-dimensional (3D) graphene structures. This is where 3D-printing comes in. Applying 3D printing concepts to nanotechnology could bring similar advantages to nanofabrication – speed, less waste, economic viability – than it is expected to bring to manufacturing technologies. These 3D printing techniques are reaching a stage where desired products and structures can be made independent of the complexity of their shapes – even bioprinting tissue and entire organs is now in the realm of the possible. "From a 3D printing perspective, graphene has been previously incorporated into 3D printed materials, but most of these constructs comprise no greater than about 20 volume % of the total solid of the composite, resulting in electrical properties that are significantly less than what we describe in our recent work," says Ramille N. Shah (http://shahlab.northwestern.edu/), Assistant Professor, Materials Science and Engineering and Assistant Professor, Surgery (Transplant Division), Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology at Northwestern University. In new work, Shah and her team, who worked with Mark Hersam's group (http://www.hersam-group.northwestern.edu/) at Northwestern, show that high volume fraction graphene composite constructs can be formed from an easily extrudable liquid ink into multi-centimeter scaled objects. The results have been published in a paper in the April 10, 2015 online edition of ACS Nano ("Three-Dimensional Printing of High-Content Graphene Scaffolds for Electronic and Biomedical Applications" (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1021/acsnano.5b01179)). The researchers developed a solution-based, scalable graphene ink (3DG) that can be 3D-printed under ambient conditions via simple extrusion into arbitrarily shaped, electrically conductive, mechanically resilient, and biocompatible scaffolds with filaments ranging in diameter from 100 to 1000 µm. Despite being comprised primarily of graphene (60 vol % of solid), which is stiff and brittle, the resulting material is very flexible and can be easily printed into small or large scale (multiple centimeters) objects. "Our resulting 3D printed constructs contains majority graphene while maintaining structural integrity and handability, which is enabled by the particular biocompatible elastomer binder – PLG – that we chose in combination with the solvent system," explains Shah. She notes that a significant motivating factor behind this work was the need for more innovative biomaterials for nervous tissue regeneration, and also biomaterials that are translatable – i.e. scalable and not so expensive to produce. Theses novel 3D printable graphene inks are relatively easy to produce in a scalable fashion, can be rapidly fabricated into an infinite variety of forms (including patient specific implants), and are also surgically friendly (can be trimmed to size and sutured to surrounding tissue). It was known previously that graphene and conductive materials could influence cell behavior, particularly those related to neurogenic stem cell lines. Many previous studies, however, used neural stem cells, which are already predisposed to become neuron-like cells but are difficult to translate clinically. A highly interesting result for stem cell researchers is the demonstration of neurogenic differentiation of adult mesenchymal stem cells without added biological factors – such as nerve growth factor – or electrical stimulation (unlike neural stem cells, adult mesenchymal stem cells are a more translatable cell source since they can be easily obtained from patients). "In our experiments, we have shown the ability of 3DG scaffolds to induce neurogenic differentiation of adult mesenchymal stem cells without the need for any other neurogenic growth factors or external stimuli," Shah points out. "This is a major finding that supports the use of materials themselves for inducing specific cellular responses that can be leveraged for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications." The researchers' results suggest that the unique physical, electrical, and biological properties of 3DG could open the door to addressing a variety of medical problems requiring the regeneration of damaged, degenerated, or otherwise non-functional electrogenic tissues such as nerves, bone, or skeletal and cardiac muscle. Beyond regenerative medicine applications, there are a number of other potential medical applications including using 3DG in implantable biosensors and/or electrical devices. Outside of medicine, there is potential for 3DG to be used for biodegradable electronics or sensors in consumer products. This work is an excellent example of how 3D printing can aid in developing entirely new kinds of functional material systems, with unique, and highly advantageous properties, such as those exhibited by 3DG. Particular challenges to realize this include the creation of 3D printable functional material inks that are also scalable and translatable. Another challenge is the ability to 3D print multiple types of materials to create functioning devices. Last but not least, innovations in 3D printers themselves are still needed to be able to easily scale and multi-material print at a commercial manufacturing level. Source: Nanowerk (http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=39905.php)