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NIST and NSF Partner to Launch Industry-University Consortium to Provide Input on National ...

National Nanomanufacturing Network - April 30, 2015 - 3:44am
The U.S. Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced today that they will establish a consortium to provide private‐sector input on national advanced manufacturing research and development priorities. NSF has released a solicitation (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505203), calling for applications from organizations to administer the consortium through a cooperative agreement. The consortium is being established in response to one of the primary recommendations published in Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (http://manufacturing.gov/about_adv_mfg.html) and the Advanced Manufacturing Subcommittee of the President's National Science and Technology Council. The solicitation (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505203) issued today by NSF explains that the agencies will provide funding of up to $6 million total (up to $2 million per year for up to three years), with no cost share required. Applications are due July 20, 2015. NSF will have primary administrative responsibility for the consortium. NIST will have responsibility for consortium-organized conferences and outreach activities. NSF and NIST also are collaborating with NASA and the departments of Defense, Education and Energy to build the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (http://manufacturing.gov/nnmi.html), a network of research and development centers aimed at scaling up cutting-edge manufacturing technologies to enable the rapid commercialization of made-in-America products. The Obama Administration has made investing in cutting-edge manufacturing technologies a priority, increasing federal manufacturing research and development investment by a third to nearly $2 billion annually. U.S. leadership in transformative emerging manufacturing technologies anchors U.S. competitiveness for advanced manufacturing jobs and investment. The new consortium will play an important role in informing these critical investments in the future of U.S. advanced manufacturing. As a non-regulatory agency of the Commerce Department, NIST promotes U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life. To learn more about NIST, visit www.nist.gov (http://www.nist.gov/). Source: NIST (http://www.nist.gov/director/2015422nistnsf.cfm)

MIT sensor detects spoiled meat

National Nanomanufacturing Network - April 30, 2015 - 3:39am
Tiny device could be incorporated into “smart packaging” to improve food safety. MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat. The sensor, which consists of chemically modified carbon nanotubes, could be deployed in “smart packaging” that would offer much more accurate safety information than the expiration date on the package, says Timothy Swager, the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry at MIT. It could also cut down on food waste, he adds. “People are constantly throwing things out that probably aren’t bad,” says Swager, who is the senior author of a paper describing the new sensor this week in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The paper’s lead author is graduate student Sophie Liu. Other authors are former lab technician Alexander Petty and postdoc Graham Sazama. The sensor is similar to other carbon nanotube devices that Swager’s lab has developed in recent years, including one that detects the ripeness of fruit (http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2012/fruit-spoilage-sensor-0430). All of these devices work on the same principle: Carbon nanotubes can be chemically modified so that their ability to carry an electric current changes in the presence of a particular gas. In this case, the researchers modified the carbon nanotubes with metal-containing compounds called metalloporphyrins, which contain a central metal atom bound to several nitrogen-containing rings. Hemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood, is a metalloporphyrin with iron as the central atom. For this sensor, the researchers used a metalloporphyrin with cobalt at its center. Metalloporphyrins are very good at binding to nitrogen-containing compounds called amines. Of particular interest to the researchers were the so-called biogenic amines, such as putrescine and cadaverine, which are produced by decaying meat. When the cobalt-containing porphyrin binds to any of these amines, it increases the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube, which can be easily measured. “We use these porphyrins to fabricate a very simple device where we apply a potential across the device and then monitor the current. When the device encounters amines, which are markers of decaying meat, the current of the device will become lower,” Liu says. In this study, the researchers tested the sensor on four types of meat: pork, chicken, cod, and salmon. They found that when refrigerated, all four types stayed fresh over four days. Left unrefrigerated, the samples all decayed, but at varying rates. There are other sensors that can detect the signs of decaying meat, but they are usually large and expensive instruments that require expertise to operate. “The advantage we have is these are the cheapest, smallest, easiest-to-manufacture sensors,” Swager says. “There are several potential advantages in having an inexpensive sensor for measuring, in real time, the freshness of meat and fish products, including preventing foodborne illness, increasing overall customer satisfaction, and reducing food waste at grocery stores and in consumers’ homes,” says Roberto Forloni, a senior science fellow at Sealed Air, a major supplier of food packaging, who was not part of the research team. The new device also requires very little power and could be incorporated into a wireless platform Swager’s lab recently developed (http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/wireless-chemical-sensor-for-smartphone-1208) that allows a regular smartphone to read output from carbon nanotube sensors such as this one. The researchers have filed for a patent on the technology and hope to license it for commercial development. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office through MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies. Source: MIT News (http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2015/sensor-detects-spoiled-meat-0415)

Nanowire networks can hardwire adaptability

Nanotechweb - April 29, 2015 - 5:45am
(with video) By merging top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques, researchers readily produce nanowire networks with behaviour analogous to adaptability and memory.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Self-assembling biomaterial forms nanostructure templates for human tissue formation

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Unlike scaffold-based methods to engineer human tissues for regenerative medicine applications, an innovative synthetic material with the ability to self-assemble into nanostructures to support tissue...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

International research team discovers new mechanism behind malaria progression: Findings provide a new avenue for research in malaria treatment

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
A team of researchers from four universities has pinpointed one of the mechanisms responsible for the progression of malaria, providing a new target for possible treatments.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

More is less in novel electronic material: Adding electrons actually shrinks the system

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Add water to a half-filled cup and the water level rises. This everyday experience reflects a positive material property of the water-cup system. But what if adding more water lowers the water level b...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
In 2013 James Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, and colleagues at Columbia demonstrated that they could dramatically improve the performance of graphene-...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Scientists join forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
A microscopic tool, more than 1000 times thinner than the width of a single human hair, uses vibrations to simultaneously reveal the mass and the shape of a single molecule - a feat which has not been...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

The 16th Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT 2015) unveils 25 Keynote Speakers: Call for abstracts open

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Toulouse (France) will host the 16th edition of the Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT 2015) from the 07th until the 11th of September 2015. This high-level scientific meeting aims...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Graphenea celebrates fifth anniversary

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
On April 9th, Graphenea celebrated its fifth anniversary. Graphenea has gone a long way from its startup phase as a small graphene manufacturer. The company now serves customers in more than 50 countr...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New Ceramic Material Improves Properties of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers proposed a simple and cheap method to produce hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and improve its mechanical properties.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Sensor Designed in Iran Able to Remove Formaldehyde Gas from Environment

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Academic researchers in Iran carried out computational studies and modeling of a sensor to detect formaldehyde gas.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Cacao Seed Extract Used in Production of Catalytic Nanoparticles

Nanotech-Now - April 28, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers used cacao seed extract to produce catalytic nanoparticles which can be applied in production of organic materials and compounds as non-homogenous, stable and recyclable catalysts.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT2015)

InterNano - Upcoming Events - April 27, 2015 - 7:49am
September 7, 2015 - The 16th edition of Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT2015) is being launched following the overwhelming success of earlier Nanotechnology Conferences. The TNT2015 edition will take place in Toulouse (France). This high-level scientific meeting series aims to present a broad range of current research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology as well as related policies (European Commission, etc.) or other kind of initiatives (iNANO, nanoGUNE, MANA, GDR-I, etc.). TNT events have demonstrated that they are particularly effective in transmitting information and establishing contacts among workers in this field. The TNT2015 structure will keep the fundamental features of the previous editions, providing a unique opportunity for broad interaction.

Laid-back approach streamlines gate production

Nanotechweb - April 27, 2015 - 6:13am
(with audio) Horizontally oriented nanowire transistors simplify multiple gate fabrication and help towards 3D networks.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoribbons get smaller

Nanotechweb - April 27, 2015 - 5:38am
Researchers in Japan have made the world’s smallest-width graphene nanoribbons ever – inside carbon nanotubes.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

SEFCU, SUNY Poly CNSE Announce Winning Student-Led Teams in the 6th Annual $500,000 New York Business Plan Competition

Nanotech-Now - April 26, 2015 - 7:45am
Student team ‘UMA Bioseed’ receives $100,000 grand prize for a unique seed coating enabling higher crop yields; Five teams awarded $10,000 first place prizes out of the 500 teams that applied to take...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Northwestern scientists develop first liquid nanolaser: Technology could lead to new way of doing 'lab on a chip' medical diagnostics

Nanotech-Now - April 26, 2015 - 7:45am
Northwestern University scientists have developed the first liquid nanoscale laser. And it's tunable in real time, meaning you can quickly and simply produce different colors, a unique and useful feat...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotech-enabled moisturizer speeds healing of diabetic skin wounds: Spherical nucleic acids silence gene that interferes with wound healing

Nanotech-Now - April 26, 2015 - 7:45am
A new high-tech but simple ointment applied to the skin may one day help diabetic patients heal stubborn and painful ulcers on their feet, Northwestern University researchers report.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Fast and accurate 3-D imaging technique to track optically trapped particles

Nanotech-Now - April 26, 2015 - 7:45am
KAIST researchers published an article on the development of a novel technique to precisely track the 3-D positions of optically trapped particles having complicated geometry in high speed in the Apri...
Categories: Nanotechnology News