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Ultraflex Power Technologies’ family of Induction Heating Systems show effectiveness for Nanoparticle Research

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
In recent testing, Ultraflex Power Technologies utilized their nano-llite UPT-n2 System to successfully heat a vial containing nanoparticles to 60°C. The testing was part of evaluations for a resear...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Unlocking nanofibers’ potential: Prototype boosts production of versatile fibers fourfold, while cutting energy consumption by 92 percent

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
Nanofibers — polymer filaments only a couple of hundred nanometers in diameter — have a huge range of potential applications, from solar cells to water filtration to fuel cells. But so far, their high...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

TenasiTech secures additional $509,000 funding to bring scratch resistant acrylics to the world

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
TenasiTech has been awarded a major grant from the Australian Government to bring its nano-additives for acrylic glass to the global market.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

FEI Launches New DualBeam Plasma Focused Ion Beam for Electrical Fault Isolation & Failure Analysis: New Helios PFIB EFI is a fully-integrated deprocessing and fault isolation solution that reduces analysis time from days to just hours

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) today launched a new DualBeam™ plasma focused ion beam (PFIB) for sample preparation, electrical fault isolation (EFI) and electrical failure analysis (EFA) on sub-20nm semiconducto...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Production of Nanocomposites by Using Direct Nano-Welding of Micromaterials in Iran

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers from Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources proposed a new method for the production of cellulose nanocomposites.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Silica Nanoparticles Applied in Production of Drug Nanocarriers

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers used new cheap materials through a simple method to synthesize biodegradable and biocompatible nanocarriers which control the rate and amount of drug release.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Haydale Subsidiary Changes Name & Creates New Aerospace Unit

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
Haydale Ltd., a leader in the development of enhanced graphene and nanoparticulate materials, has announced a number of important developments at its EPL Composite Solutions Ltd subsidiary acquired in...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Environmental Issues to Hamper Growth of Global Nanocomposites Market

Nanotech-Now - June 6, 2015 - 7:45am
Shift of focus towards weight reduction and vehicle safety in the world of automobiles is a prominent factor that drives the global nanocomposites market. As per the conventional understanding of the...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoengineers win grant to make smart clothes for personalized cooling and heating

National Nanomanufacturing Network - June 5, 2015 - 8:56am
Liezel LabiosGarment-based printable electrodes developed in the lab of Joseph Wang, distinguished professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego, and lead principal investigator of ATTACH. (Image: Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego) Imagine a fabric that will keep your body at a comfortable temperature—regardless of how hot or cold it actually is. That’s the goal of an engineering project at the University of California, San Diego, funded with a $2.6M grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). Wearing this smart fabric could potentially reduce heating and air conditioning bills for buildings and homes. The project, named ATTACH (Adaptive Textiles Technology with Active Cooling and Heating), is led by Joseph Wang, distinguished professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego. By regulating the temperature around an individual person, rather than a large room, the smart fabric could potentially cut the energy use of buildings and homes by at least 15 percent, Wang noted. “In cases where there are only one or two people in a large room, it’s not cost-effective to heat or cool the entire room,” said Wang. “If you can do it locally, like you can in a car by heating just the car seat instead of the entire car, then you can save a lot of energy.” The smart fabric will be designed to regulate the temperature of the wearer’s skin—keeping it at 93° F—by adapting to temperature changes in the room. When the room gets cooler, the fabric will become thicker. When the room gets hotter, the fabric will become thinner. To accomplish this feat, the researchers will insert polymers that expand in the cold and shrink in the heat inside the smart fabric. “Regardless if the surrounding temperature increases or decreases, the user will still feel the same without having to adjust the thermostat,” said Wang. “93° F is the average comfortable skin temperature for most people,” added Renkun Chen, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UC San Diego, and one of the collaborators on this project. Chen’s contribution to ATTACH is to develop supplemental heating and cooling devices, called thermoelectrics, that are printable and will be incorporated into specific spots of the smart fabric. The thermoelectrics will regulate the temperature on “hot spots”—such as areas on the back and underneath the feet—that tend to get hotter than other parts of the body when a person is active. “This is like a personalized air-conditioner and heater,” said Chen. Saving energy “With the smart fabric, you won’t need to heat the room as much in the winter, and you won’t need to cool the room down as much in the summer. That means less energy is consumed. Plus, you will still feel comfortable within a wider temperature range,” said Chen. The researchers are also designing the smart fabric to power itself. The fabric will include rechargeable batteries, which will power the thermoelectrics, as well as biofuel cells that can harvest electrical power from human sweat. Plus, all of these parts—batteries, thermoelectrics and biofuel cells—will be printed using the technology developed in Wang’s lab to make printable wearable devices. These parts will also be thin, stretchable and flexible to ensure that the smart fabric is not bulky or heavy. “We are aiming to make the smart clothing look and feel as much like the clothes that people regularly wear. It will be washable, stretchable, bendable and lightweight. We also hope to make it look attractive and fashionable to wear,” said Wang. In terms of price, the team has not yet concluded how much the smart clothing will cost. This will depend on the scale of production, but the printing technology in Wang’s lab will offer a low-cost method to produce the parts. Keeping the costs down is a major goal, the researchers said. The research team Professor Joseph Wang, Department of NanoEngineering Wang, the lead principal investigator of ATTACH, has pioneered the development of wearable printable devices, such as electrochemical sensors and temporary tattoo-based biofuel cells. He is the chair of the nanoengineering department and the director for the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego. His extensive expertise in printable, stretchable and wearable devices will be used here to make the proposed flexible biofuel cells, batteries and thermoelectrics. Assistant Professor Renkun Chen, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Chen specializes in heat transfer and thermoelectrics. His research group works on physics, materials and devices related to thermal energy transport, conversion and management. His specialty in these areas will be used to develop the thermal models and the thermoelectric devices. Associate Professor Shirley Meng, Department of NanoEngineering Meng’s research focuses on energy storage and conversion, particularly on battery cell design and testing. At UC San Diego, she established the Laboratory for Energy Storage and Conversion and is the inaugural director for the Sustainable Power and Energy Center. Meng will develop the rechargeable batteries and will work on power integration throughout the smart fabric system. Professor Sungho Jin, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Jin specializes in functional materials for applications in nanotechnology, magnetism, energy and biomedicine. He will design the self-responsive polymers that change in thickness based on changes in the surrounding temperature. Dr. Joshua Windmiller, CEO of Electrozyme LLC Windmiller, former Ph.D. student and postdoc in Wang’s nanoengineering lab, is an expert in printed biosensors, bioelectronics and biofuel cells. He co-founded Electrozyme LLC, a startup devoted to the development of novel biosensors for application in the personal wellness and healthcare domains. Electrozyme will serve as the industrial partner for ATTACH and will lead the efforts to test the smart fabric prototype and bring the technology into the market. Source: UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering

Cleaning up metallic oxide interfaces

Nanotechweb - June 5, 2015 - 5:49am
Insulating buffer layer improves electron mobility of 2D electron gases.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanoengineers win grant to make smart clothes for personalized cooling and heating

National Nanomanufacturing Network - June 5, 2015 - 3:56am
Imagine a fabric that will keep your body at a comfortable temperature—regardless of how hot or cold it actually is. That’s the goal of an engineering project at the University of California, San Diego, funded with a $2.6M grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). Wearing this smart fabric could potentially reduce heating and air conditioning bills for buildings and homes. The project, named ATTACH (Adaptive Textiles Technology with Active Cooling and Heating), is led by Joseph Wang, distinguished professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego. By regulating the temperature around an individual person, rather than a large room, the smart fabric could potentially cut the energy use of buildings and homes by at least 15 percent, Wang noted. “In cases where there are only one or two people in a large room, it’s not cost-effective to heat or cool the entire room,” said Wang. “If you can do it locally, like you can in a car by heating just the car seat instead of the entire car, then you can save a lot of energy.” The smart fabric will be designed to regulate the temperature of the wearer’s skin—keeping it at 93° F—by adapting to temperature changes in the room. When the room gets cooler, the fabric will become thicker. When the room gets hotter, the fabric will become thinner. To accomplish this feat, the researchers will insert polymers that expand in the cold and shrink in the heat inside the smart fabric. “Regardless if the surrounding temperature increases or decreases, the user will still feel the same without having to adjust the thermostat,” said Wang. “93° F is the average comfortable skin temperature for most people,” added Renkun Chen, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UC San Diego, and one of the collaborators on this project. Chen’s contribution to ATTACH is to develop supplemental heating and cooling devices, called thermoelectrics, that are printable and will be incorporated into specific spots of the smart fabric. The thermoelectrics will regulate the temperature on “hot spots”—such as areas on the back and underneath the feet—that tend to get hotter than other parts of the body when a person is active. “This is like a personalized air-conditioner and heater,” said Chen. Saving energy “With the smart fabric, you won’t need to heat the room as much in the winter, and you won’t need to cool the room down as much in the summer. That means less energy is consumed. Plus, you will still feel comfortable within a wider temperature range,” said Chen. The researchers are also designing the smart fabric to power itself. The fabric will include rechargeable batteries, which will power the thermoelectrics, as well as biofuel cells that can harvest electrical power from human sweat. Plus, all of these parts—batteries, thermoelectrics and biofuel cells—will be printed using the technology developed in Wang’s lab to make printable wearable devices. These parts will also be thin, stretchable and flexible to ensure that the smart fabric is not bulky or heavy. “We are aiming to make the smart clothing look and feel as much like the clothes that people regularly wear. It will be washable, stretchable, bendable and lightweight. We also hope to make it look attractive and fashionable to wear,” said Wang. In terms of price, the team has not yet concluded how much the smart clothing will cost. This will depend on the scale of production, but the printing technology in Wang’s lab will offer a low-cost method to produce the parts. Keeping the costs down is a major goal, the researchers said. The research team Professor Joseph Wang, Department of NanoEngineering Wang, the lead principal investigator of ATTACH, has pioneered the development of wearable printable devices, such as electrochemical sensors and temporary tattoo-based biofuel cells. He is the chair of the nanoengineering department and the director for the Center for Wearable Sensors (http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/wearablesensors/) at UC San Diego. His extensive expertise in printable, stretchable and wearable devices will be used here to make the proposed flexible biofuel cells, batteries and thermoelectrics. Assistant Professor Renkun Chen, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Chen specializes in heat transfer and thermoelectrics. His research group works on physics, materials and devices related to thermal energy transport, conversion and management. His specialty in these areas will be used to develop the thermal models and the thermoelectric devices. Associate Professor Shirley Meng, Department of NanoEngineering Meng’s research focuses on energy storage and conversion, particularly on battery cell design and testing. At UC San Diego, she established the Laboratory for Energy Storage and Conversion (http://smeng.ucsd.edu/) and is the inaugural director for the Sustainable Power and Energy Center (http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/sustainablepower/). Meng will develop the rechargeable batteries and will work on power integration throughout the smart fabric system. Professor Sungho Jin, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Jin specializes in functional materials for applications in nanotechnology, magnetism, energy and biomedicine. He will design the self-responsive polymers that change in thickness based on changes in the surrounding temperature. Dr. Joshua Windmiller, CEO of Electrozyme LLC Windmiller, former Ph.D. student and postdoc in Wang’s nanoengineering lab, is an expert in printed biosensors, bioelectronics and biofuel cells. He co-founded Electrozyme LLC (http://electrozyme.com/), a startup devoted to the development of novel biosensors for application in the personal wellness and healthcare domains. Electrozyme will serve as the industrial partner for ATTACH and will lead the efforts to test the smart fabric prototype and bring the technology into the market. Source: UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering (http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1753)

Tabletop technique maps thermal transport

Nanotechweb - June 4, 2015 - 8:58am
MIT team has measured how far phonons travel in a material using ultrafast optical spectroscopy.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

How natural channel proteins move in artificial membranes

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
Natural channel proteins are integrated into artificial membranes to facilitate the transport of ions and molecules. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to measure the movement o...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Visualizing the 'matrix': App provides insight into the quantum world of coupled nuclear spins

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) images are an important diagnostic tool. The achievable contrast depends on how well the nuclear spins that form the basis of the imaging signals can be controlled...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

How to cut a vortex into slices: A group of physicists, lead by Olga Vinogradova, professor at the Lomonosov Moscow State University, came up with a way to stir up a liquid in the microchannel

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
A lot of problems, associated with the mixing of the liquid in the microchannels, could be solved via proper organization of the inhomogeneous slip on the walls of these channels. This is the conclusi...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

An inexpensive rival to graphene aerogels: Researchers in China have created a new 3-dimensional polypyrrole aerogel-based electromagnetic absorber material that can serve as an inexpensive alternative to costly graphene aerogels

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
The electromagnetic radiation discharged by electronic equipment and devices is known to hinder their smooth operation. Conventional materials used today to shield from incoming electromagnetic waves...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Researchers simulate behavior of 'active matter'

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
From flocks of starlings to schools of fish, nature is full of intricate dynamics that emerge from the collective behavior of individuals. In recent years, interest has grown in trying to capture sim...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

QLEDs meet wearable devices: Korean scientists develop ultra-thin deformable QLEDs in the wearable platform

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
The scientific team, from the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) and Seoul National University, has developed an ultra-thin wearable quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs). The electronic tattoo is...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Pinholes be gone!

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have eliminated problematic pinholes in the top layer of next-generation solar cells in development. At the sa...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Centre for Process Innovation pilots Beneq’s breakthrough roll-to-roll ALD system for moisture barrier films

Nanotech-Now - June 4, 2015 - 7:45am
The UK-based Centre for Process Innovation is piloting Beneq’s groundbreaking roll-to-roll ALD system. Acquired in 2014 as CPI’s thin-film moisture barrier film development platform, the piloting acti...
Categories: Nanotechnology News