Feed aggregator

JPK expands availability of instrumentation in the USA – appointing new distributors – launched a new web site to support the US market - AFM now available to US users

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, announces their expansion into the US market with new distributors and the...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle: Versatile particles offer a wide variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-mak...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Scientists craft atomically seamless, thinnest-possible semiconductor junctions

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Scientists have developed what they believe is the thinnest-possible semiconductor, a new class of nanoscale materials made in sheets only three atoms thick.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

RMIT delivers $30m boost to micro and nano-tech

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
A new $AUD30 million research facility at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, will drive cutting-edge advances in micro- and nano-technologies.

Categories: Nanotechnology News

Creation of a Highly Efficient Technique to Develop Low-Friction Materials Which Are Drawing Attention in Association with Energy Issues

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
A research group led by Dr. Masahiro Goto, a MANA Scientist at the Nano-Electronic Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, NIMS, and Dr. Michiko Sasaki, a NIMS Postdocto...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Competition for Graphene: Berkeley Lab Researchers Demonstrate Ultrafast Charge Transfer in New Family of 2D Semiconductors

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
A new argument has just been added to the growing case for graphene being bumped off its pedestal as the next big thing in the high-tech world by the two-dimensional semiconductors known as MX2 materi...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Symphony of nanoplasmonic and optical resonators leads to magnificent laser-like light emission

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Thermal Block Coatings Developed in Iran Using Nanotechnology

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers produced nanopowder that has application in increasing the efficiency of gas engines and turbines.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Picosun joins forces with IMEC for novel, industrial ALD applications

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Picosun Oy, the leading manufacturer of high quality Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) equipment for global industries, teams up with IMEC to realize next generation's battery technology with its advanced...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Iran Unveils 5 Home-Made Knowledge-Based Products

Nanotech-Now - August 27, 2014 - 7:45am
Iran on Monday unveiled 5 indigenized knowledge-based products in a ceremony in the central city of Isfahan in the presence of First Vice-President Eshaq Jahangiri.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanotechnology engineering produces a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery

National Nanomanufacturing Network - August 27, 2014 - 4:56am
In 2015, American consumers will finally be able to purchase fuel cell cars from Toyota and other manufacturers. Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most of the cars will run on hydrogen made from natural gas, a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming. Now scientists at Stanford University have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. The battery sends an electric current through two electrodes that split liquid water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron. "Using nickel and iron, which are cheap materials, we were able to make the electrocatalysts active enough to split water at room temperature with a single 1.5-volt battery," said Hongjie Dai (http://dailab.stanford.edu/), a professor of chemistry at Stanford. "This is the first time anyone has used non-precious metal catalysts to split water at a voltage that low. It's quite remarkable, because normally you need expensive metals, like platinum or iridium, to achieve that voltage." In addition to producing hydrogen, the novel water splitter could be used to make chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide, an important industrial chemical, according to Dai. He and his colleagues describe the new device in a study (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms5695) published in the Aug. 22 issue of the journal Nature Communications. The promise of hydrogen Automakers have long considered the hydrogen fuel cell a promising alternative to the gasoline engine. Fuel cell technology is essentially water splitting in reverse. A fuel cell combines stored hydrogen gas with oxygen from the air to produce electricity, which powers the car. The only byproduct is water – unlike gasoline combustion, which emits carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas.Earlier this year, Hyundai began leasing fuel cell vehicles in Southern California. Toyota and Honda will begin selling fuel cell cars in 2015. Most of these vehicles will run on fuel (http://energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/natural-gas-reforming) manufactured at large industrial plants that produce hydrogen by combining very hot steam and natural gas, an energy-intensive process that releases carbon dioxide as a byproduct. Splitting water to make hydrogen requires no fossil fuels and emits no greenhouse gases. But scientists have yet to develop an affordable, active water splitter with catalysts capable of working at industrial scales. "It's been a constant pursuit for decades to make low-cost electrocatalysts with high activity and long durability," Dai said. "When we found out that a nickel-based catalyst is as effective as platinum, it came as a complete surprise." Saving energy and money The discovery was made by Stanford graduate student Ming Gong, co-lead author of the study. "Ming discovered a nickel-metal/nickel-oxide structure that turns out to be more active than pure nickel metal or pure nickel oxide alone," Dai said. "This novel structure favors hydrogen electrocatalysis, but we still don't fully understand the science behind it." The nickel/nickel-oxide catalyst significantly lowers the voltage required to split water, which could eventually save hydrogen producers billions of dollars in electricity costs, according to Gong. His next goal is to improve the durability of the device. "The electrodes are fairly stable, but they do slowly decay over time," he said. "The current device would probably run for days, but weeks or months would be preferable. That goal is achievable based on my most recent results" The researchers also plan to develop a water splitter than runs on electricity produced by solar energy. "Hydrogen is an ideal fuel for powering vehicles, buildings and storing renewable energy on the grid," said Dai. "We're very glad that we were able to make a catalyst that's very active and low cost. This shows that through nanoscale engineering of materials we can really make a difference in how we make fuels and consume energy."Source: Stanford University (http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/august/splitter-clean-fuel-082014.html)