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Ultra-thin hollow nanocages could reduce platinum use in fuel cell electrodes

InterNano Industry News - August 18, 2015 - 3:45am
A new fabrication technique that produces platinum hollow nanocages with ultra-thin walls could dramatically reduce the amount of the costly metal needed to provide catalytic activity in such applicat...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Stretchable Conducting Fiber Provides Super Hero Capabilities

InterNano Industry News - August 18, 2015 - 3:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> Image: The University of Texas at Dallas The list of potential applications for a new electrically conducting fiber—artificial muscles,  exoskeletons and morphing aircraft—sounds like something out of science fiction or a comic book. With a list like that, it’s got to be a pretty special fiber… and it is. The fiber, made from sheets of carbon nanotubes wrapped around a rubber core, can be stretched to 14 times its original length and actually increase its electrical conductivity while being stretched, without losing any of its resistance. An international research team based at the University of Texas at Dallas  initially targeted the new super fiber for artificial muscles and for capacitors whose storage capacity increases tenfold when the fiber is stretched. However, the researchers believe that the material could be used as interconnects in flexible electronics and a host of other related applications. In research published in the journal Science , the team describes how they devised a method for wrapping electrically conductive sheets of carbon nanotubes around the rubber core in such a way that the fiber's resistance doesn’t change when stretched, but its conductivity increases. You can watch a demonstration in the video below: “We make the inelastic carbon nanotube sheaths of our sheath-core fibers super stretchable by modulating large buckles with small buckles, so that the elongation of both buckle types can contribute to elasticity, said Ray Baughman, senior author of the paper and director of the Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute at UT Dallas, in a press release. “These amazing fibers maintain the same electrical resistance, even when stretched by giant amounts, because electrons can travel over such a hierarchically buckled sheath as easily as they can traverse a straight sheath.” The researchers have also been able to add a thin coat of rubber to the sheath-core fibers and then another carbon nanotube sheath to create strain sensors and artificial muscles. In this setup, the buckled nanotube sheets act as electrodes and the thin rubber coating serves as the dielectric. Voilà! You have a fiber capacitor. “This technology could be well-suited for rapid commercialization,” said Raquel Ovalle-Robles, one of the paper’s authors, in the press release. “The rubber cores used for these sheath-core fibers are inexpensive and readily available. The only exotic component is the carbon nanotube aerogel sheet used for the fiber sheath.”
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Turing nanopatterns go biological

Nanotechweb - August 17, 2015 - 4:59am
New observations may help in the development of artificial antireflective surfaces inspired by these natural patterns.

Moist perovskite films could make better solar cells

Nanotechweb - August 17, 2015 - 4:42am
New result might help further improve the performance of these up-and-coming solar-cell materials.

Black phosphorus surges ahead of graphene: A Korean team of scientists tune BP's band gap to form a superior conductor, allowing for the application to be mass produced for electronic and optoelectronics devices

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
A Korean team of scientists tune BP's band gap to form a superior conductor, allowing for the application to be mass produced for electronic and optoelectronics devices

Exercise-induced hormone irisin is not a 'myth'

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Irisin, a hormone linked to the positive benefits of exercise, was recently questioned to exist in humans. Two recent studies pointed to possible flaws in the methods used to identify irisin, with com...

Attosecond Electron Catapult

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
A team of physicists and chemists from the Laboratory of Attosecond Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics has studied the interaction of light wi...

Lehigh University-DuPont tribology research seeks to reduce wear and waste

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Friction and wear consume 2 to 6 percent of an industrialized nation’s GDP. In the United States, that amounts to hundreds of billions of dollars each year. 

Rice, Penn State open center for 2-D coatings: National Science Foundation selects universities to develop atom-thin materials with industry partners

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
A new center at Rice University and Pennsylvania State University will study, in collaboration with industry, the development of atom-thin two-dimensional coatings for a variety of uses.

Advance in photodynamic therapy offers new approach to ovarian cancer

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Researchers at Oregon State University have made a significant advance in the use of photodynamic therapy to combat ovarian cancer in laboratory animals, using a combination of techniques that achieve...

Nano-Scientists' Efforts Lead to Curing Nerve Injuries

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian nanotechnology researchers from Sharif University of Technology produced a laboratorial sample of nerve conduction channel.

Possibility to Produce Nanofibers with Controlled Size

Nanotech-Now - August 16, 2015 - 7:45am
Iranian researchers studied the effective parameters on the production of polymeric nanofibers through electrospinning method.

Graphene oxide films get reduced

Nanotechweb - August 14, 2015 - 8:43am
rG-O could come in use for a wide range of practical applications including coatings, protective layers, energy storage systems and membranes.

Sediment dwelling creatures at risk from nanoparticles in common household products

Nanotech-Now - August 14, 2015 - 7:45am
Researchers from the University of Exeter highlight the risk that engineered nanoparticles released from masonry paint on exterior facades, and consumer products such as zinc oxide cream, could have o...

Aculon Launches “Loaded” Ecommerce Site

Nanotech-Now - August 14, 2015 - 7:45am
Aculon, Inc., a leading supplier of nanocoatings today announces the launch of their “loaded” ecommerce site to enable their customers to more easily acquire their products. The site will have a broa...

New spectroscopy technique provides unprecedented insights about the reactions powering fuel cells Nanotech-enabled chip developed at UCLA can analyze chemical reactions more accurately than large machines

Nanotech-Now - August 14, 2015 - 7:45am
Researchers at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute have developed a dramatically advanced tool for analyzing how chemicals called nanocatalysts convert chemical reactions into electricity.

Quantum computing advance locates neutral atoms

Nanotech-Now - August 14, 2015 - 7:45am
For any computer, being able to manipulate information is essential, but for quantum computing, singling out one data location without influencing any of the surrounding locations is difficult. Now, a...

ACS To Launch New Journal On Sensor Science

InterNano Industry News - August 14, 2015 - 3:45am
Publishing: Justin Gooding of the University of New South Wales will serve as editor-in-chief
Categories: Nanotechnology News

NanoBCA Congratulates Winners of Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards

InterNano Industry News - August 14, 2015 - 3:45am
The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like to congratulate the winners of the 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is recognizing landmark green chemistry technologies developed by industrial pioneers and leading scientists that turn climate risk and other environmental problems into business opportunities, spurring innovation and economic development. “From academia to business, we congratulate those who bring innovative solutions that will help solve some of the most critical environmental problems,” said Jim Jones, EPA’s Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “These innovations reduce the use of energy, hazardous chemicals and water, while cutting manufacturing costs and sparking investments. In some cases they turn pollution into useful products. Ultimately, these manufacturing processes and products are safer for people’s health and the environment. We will continue to work with the 2015 winners as their technologies are adopted in the marketplace.” The Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award winners were honored at a ceremony in Washington, DC. The winners and their innovative technologies are: Algenol in Fort Myers, Florida, is being recognized for developing a blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels. The algae uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters with sunlight and saltwater to create fuel while dramatically reducing the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, with no reliance on food crops as feedstocks. This is a win-win for the company, the public, and the environment. It has the potential to revolutionize this industry and reduce the carbon footprint of fuel production. Hybrid Coating Technologies/Nanotech Industries of Daly City, California, is being recognized for developing a safer, plant-based polyurethane for use on floors, furniture and in foam insulation. The technology eliminates the use of isocyanates, the number one cause of workplace asthma. This is already in production, is reducing VOC’s and costs, and is safer for people and the environment. LanzaTech in Skokie, Illinois, is being recognized for the development of a process that uses waste gas to produce fuels and chemicals, reducing companies’ carbon footprint. LanzaTech has partnered with Global Fortune 500 Companies and others to use this technology, including facilities that can each produce 100,000 gallons per year of ethanol, and a number of chemical ingredients for the manufacture of plastics. This technology is already a proven winner and has enormous potential for American industry. SOLTEX (Synthetic Oils and Lubricants of Texas) in Houston, Texas, is being recognized for developing a new chemical reaction process that eliminates the use of water and reduces hazardous chemicals in the production of additives for lubricants and gasoline. If widely used, this technology has the potential to eliminate millions of gallons of wastewater per year and reduce the use of a hazardous chemical by 50 percent. Renmatix in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, is being recognized for developing a process using supercritical water to more cost effectively break down plant material into sugars used as building blocks for renewable chemicals and fuels. This innovative low-cost process could result in a sizeable increase in the production of plant-based chemicals and fuels, and reduce the dependence on petroleum fuels. Professor Eugene Chen of Colorado State University is being recognized for developing a process that uses plant-based materials in the production of renewable chemicals and liquid fuels.  This new technology is waste-free and metal-free. It offers significant potential for the production of renewable chemicals, fuels, and bioplastics that can be used in a wide range of safer industrial and consumer products. During the 20 years of the program, EPA has received more than 1500 nominations and presented awards to 104 technologies. Winning technologies are responsible for annually reducing the use or generation of more than 826 million pounds of hazardous chemicals, saving 21 billion gallons of water, and eliminating 7.8 billion pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent releases to air. An independent panel of technical experts convened by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute formally judged the 2015 submissions from among scores of nominated technologies and made recommendations to EPA for the 2015 winners. The 2015 awards event was held in conjunction with the 2015 Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. Please help us spread the word about the 2015 winners and their innovative technologies within your own communication channels and through social media and web.  Feel free to share this email with your contacts and repost the social media content. * Share our Twitter post. [ https://twitter.com/EPA/status/620652522844368896 ] * 2015 Presidential Green Chemistry Award winners and share the blog. [ https://blog.epa.gov/blog/2015/07/american-innovators/ ] For more information on this year’s winners and those from the last two decades, visit http://www2.epa.gov/green-chemistry Once again, the NanoBCA is proud to congratulate our colleagues in the nanotechnology community.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Artificial moth eyes enhance the performance of silicon solar cells

InterNano Industry News - August 14, 2015 - 3:45am
Mimicking the texture found on the highly antireflective surfaces of the compound eyes of moths, we use block copolymer self assembly to produce precise and tunable nanotextured designs in the range of ~20 nm across macroscopic silicon solar cells. This nanoscale texturing imparts broadband antireflection properties and significantly enhances performance compared with typical antireflection coatings. Proper design of an antireflection coating involves managing the refractive index mismatch at an abrupt optical interface. The most straightforward approach introduces a single layer of an intermediate optical index atop of a surface to create a system that engenders destructive interference in reflected light. This usually provides full antireflection at only a single wavelength. Increasingly broadband coverage, for application in transparent window coatings, military camouflage, or solar cells, is possible using multilayered thin-film schemes. An alternative to thin-film coating strategies, nanoscale patterns applied to the surface of a material, can create an effective medium between the substrate and air. Such structures provide broadband antireflection over a wide range of incident light angles when nanoscale, sub-wavelength textures are sufficiently tall and closely spaced. In this work, we enhance the broadband antireflection properties of a nanofabricated moth eye structure through simultaneous control of both the geometry and optical properties, using block copolymer self assembly to design nanotextures that are sufficiently small to take advantage of a beneficial material surface layer that is only a few nanometers thick.
Categories: Nanotechnology News